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[OT] A Journal of the Plague Year
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William Hyde
2020-03-17 20:41:16 UTC
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Part one of a one part series.

[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]

I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.

But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.

I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.

In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.

Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.

William Hyde
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-17 21:48:08 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".

Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.

True story, but I don't know if I dare go back??
Post by William Hyde
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
William Hyde
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-17 22:57:27 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".
Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
True story, but I don't know if I dare go back??
Bravo! You really nailed the style!

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
D B Davis
2020-03-18 12:24:12 UTC
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Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between
the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen
vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No
broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of
peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be
racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".
Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile
and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
True story, but I don't know if I dare go back??
Bravo! You really nailed the style!
This Defoe dilettante concurs. Very entertaining.



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-18 00:32:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
And every day would end with "and so to bed."
Post by Robert Carnegie
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
Oh! Well done! Reminiscent of Sea Wasp being Mentor of Arisia.
Do go on.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
William Hyde
2020-03-18 19:19:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
I faded at his wife's perpetual open wound. Too depressing.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".
Not in this case. It's just a marketing ploy to sell perfectly normal vegetables. They also offer a "California mix" which presumably has little to do with that state except that most of the vegetables are grown there. As also with the "asian blend".

None of these vegetables have been closer to Asia than the coast of California, in fact.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
Well done!

William Hyde
Paul S Person
2020-03-19 17:11:38 UTC
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On Wed, 18 Mar 2020 12:19:43 -0700 (PDT), William Hyde
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
I faded at his wife's perpetual open wound. Too depressing.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".
Not in this case. It's just a marketing ploy to sell perfectly normal vegetables. They also offer a "California mix" which presumably has little to do with that state except that most of the vegetables are grown there. As also with the "asian blend".
None of these vegetables have been closer to Asia than the coast of California, in fact.
The /flavorings/ might be based on something used in Californa or in
Asia, respectively.

But, yes, this sort of thing is best regarded as a brand name.

Unless it is in an entire section labled "Asian" with contents to
match. Then some authenticity might exist. Although mere mimicry is
also quite likely.
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
Well done!
William Hyde
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
J. Clarke
2020-03-19 20:52:36 UTC
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On Thu, 19 Mar 2020 10:11:38 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 18 Mar 2020 12:19:43 -0700 (PDT), William Hyde
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
You could go with Samuel Pepys and give us the
naughty bits. ;-)
I faded at his wife's perpetual open wound. Too depressing.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by William Hyde
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
I don't recognise the term. Fighting through several
meanings online, it says "lightly flavoured with Asian
seasoning".
Not in this case. It's just a marketing ploy to sell perfectly normal vegetables. They also offer a "California mix" which presumably has little to do with that state except that most of the vegetables are grown there. As also with the "asian blend".
None of these vegetables have been closer to Asia than the coast of California, in fact.
The /flavorings/ might be based on something used in Californa or in
Asia, respectively.
But, yes, this sort of thing is best regarded as a brand name.
Unless it is in an entire section labled "Asian" with contents to
match. Then some authenticity might exist. Although mere mimicry is
also quite likely.
Generally speaking the "Asian Mix" has some kind of edible-pod peas.
Post by Paul S Person
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Did half a dozen Asian families go hungry because you
got there first? I suspect they never touch the stuff.
Post by William Hyde
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
I to the Morrisons' emporium, wherein I espied
but one packet on ye shelf of artificial sweeteners.
My conscience was prick'd whether I might take it,
whereupon my eye lighted on one other packet at the
shelf's back, beyond the reach of an ordinary man.
An urge came on me that I answer'd by producing
and then extending my instrument, to wit, a folded
umbrella of telescopical construction. Attaining
my desire, with the cunningly hook'd handle end,
I clasp'd it in a trice and went my way most
satisfi'd. Verily, the hard won is good to find.
Well done!
William Hyde
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-18 20:12:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist

Happy Saint Patrick's Day if this link works:


m***@sky.com
2020-03-18 21:04:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
http://youtu.be/nbxa4PF4Ku8
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise. Basic exercises for limited conditions and no equipment should have been common knowledge since at least the Canadian Air Force 5BX Exercises. One modern source can be found by searching for "reddit bodyweight fitness". Personally, I like to cycle uphill as fast as I possibly can for relatively short periods of condensed exercise. Announcing at the start "I feel the need... the need for Speed!" is optional :-).

Happy St Patrick's day to you too. My Father used to say "St Patrick turns over the warm side of the stone" Searching to try and find what he said about potato planting finds another St Patrick's day related link at https://www.rte.ie/brainstorm/2019/0314/1036394-a-day-off-from-lent-st-patricks-day-traditions-from-the-past/ (since we were Irish Presbyterians, not Catholics, we had no tradition of observing Lent - I suspect that the lack of such a tradition among Irish Presbyterians is directly related to the Irish Catholic observance of it).
Paul S Person
2020-03-19 17:16:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
http://youtu.be/nbxa4PF4Ku8
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise. Basic exercises for limited conditions and no equipment should have been common knowledge since at least the Canadian Air Force 5BX Exercises. One modern source can be found by searching for "reddit bodyweight fitness". Personally, I like to cycle uphill as fast as I possibly can for relatively short periods of condensed exercise. Announcing at the start "I feel the need... the need for Speed!" is optional :-).
I don't know about that: I seem to need /both/ to lose weight.

Then again, I never tried a 1200 Calorie diet either.
Post by m***@sky.com
Happy St Patrick's day to you too. My Father used to say "St Patrick turns over the warm side of the stone" Searching to try and find what he said about potato planting finds another St Patrick's day related link at https://www.rte.ie/brainstorm/2019/0314/1036394-a-day-off-from-lent-st-patricks-day-traditions-from-the-past/ (since we were Irish Presbyterians, not Catholics, we had no tradition of observing Lent - I suspect that the lack of such a tradition among Irish Presbyterians is directly related to the Irish Catholic observance of it).
Although Protestants that follow the Church Year undoubtedly
/recognize/ Lent, I don't think very many of them /observe/ it.

Easter and Christmas, OTOH ...
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dan Tilque
2020-03-20 07:14:41 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.

Personally, I ride about two and a half, maybe three hours at a time. I
don't bother to watch my calorie consumption. A couple years ago I made
a very rough calculation that I eat about 4000 calories/day and my diet
hasn't changed much since then. Yet my weight is roughly stable, varying
between winter when it goes up about 10-15 pounds versus summer, when I
burn that excess off.
Post by m***@sky.com
Personally, I like to cycle uphill as fast as I possibly can for
relatively short periods of condensed exercise. Announcing at the start
"I feel the need... the need for Speed!" is optional :-).

I do pretty much the same. It's much the same as doing intervals when
running. When I'm in shape, (I get somewhat out of shape every winter)
the steeper the hill the better. And to an extent, the longer the hill
the better.

I don't plan on letting this epidemic change my cycling habits.
--
Dan Tilque
h***@gmail.com
2020-03-20 07:36:41 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.

So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...

Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-20 10:29:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-03-20 14:45:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.

You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
It's important to be comfortable in your own skin
because it's illegal to wear someone else's.
Alan Baker
2020-03-20 15:36:40 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?

I thought you were picking a side.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-21 11:26:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?
I thought you were picking a side.
Terry Austin.

Apparently I can call a smeghead from the vasty deep.
I have done so. He will engage with you, and I will
flick each of you away with the finger I use for -
I'll let you wonder about that.
m***@sky.com
2020-03-21 12:20:13 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?
I thought you were picking a side.
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first boyfriend lets himself go to seed both physically and morally.
Kevrob
2020-03-21 15:01:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform
feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic
Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly
to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would
keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN
universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains
unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more
recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in
the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been
more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in
Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first
boyfriend lets > himself go to seed both physically and morally.
ObRL:

[quote]

...astronauts on the [International Space]station work out six out
of seven days a week for 2.5 hours each day.

[/quote]

https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/29/16217348/nasa-iss-how-do-astronauts-exercise-in-space

Keeping fit enough to deal with planetary environments
would require constant acceleration=> 1g in normal space,
or some sort of artificial gravity if at zero or low thrust.
Who knows what would pertain in any possible translight/hyper-
spatial travel.

Kevin R
Paul S Person
2020-03-21 17:09:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by m***@sky.com
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform
feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic
Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly
to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would
keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN
universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains
unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more
recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in
the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been
more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in
Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first
boyfriend lets > himself go to seed both physically and morally.
[quote]
...astronauts on the [International Space]station work out six out
of seven days a week for 2.5 hours each day.
[/quote]
https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/29/16217348/nasa-iss-how-do-astronauts-exercise-in-space
Keeping fit enough to deal with planetary environments
would require constant acceleration=> 1g in normal space,
or some sort of artificial gravity if at zero or low thrust.
Who knows what would pertain in any possible translight/hyper-
spatial travel.
Which, of course, is why large rotating circular structures occur in
SF books and films: to provide, one way or another, the effects of
gravity.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-21 15:22:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?
I thought you were picking a side.
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first boyfriend lets himself go to seed both physically and morally.
_The First Men in the Moon_ arrive and start jumping
around, but they wait a while in their capsule first.
(I think the Apollo 11 crew did about the same thing.)
It's stated that upon returning from the Moon to
the Earth, considerable fatigue follows.

Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
J. Clarke
2020-03-21 15:33:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 08:22:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much a myth, tiny
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to cope with an
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?
I thought you were picking a side.
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first boyfriend lets himself go to seed both physically and morally.
_The First Men in the Moon_ arrive and start jumping
around, but they wait a while in their capsule first.
(I think the Apollo 11 crew did about the same thing.)
It's stated that upon returning from the Moon to
the Earth, considerable fatigue follows.
Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
However he also has a centrifuge, on which he jogs.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-21 15:55:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 08:22:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
On 20 Mar 2020 at 10:29:57 GMT, "Robert Carnegie"
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the
exercise generally does make you eat more...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by h***@gmail.com
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
Diet and no exercise is liable to slow your metabolism.
(So id television. Usenet, I dunno.) So it's like
diseases where more than one treatment is applied
simultaneously. Move around so you don't slow down.
The "body goes into starvation mode" when dieting is pretty much
a myth, tiny
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
grain of truth but unless you're eating nothing for days straight it's
irrelevant to anyone watching their calories.
You do get tired if you don't have enough ready blood sugars to
cope with an
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Alan Baker
immediate task, though. That's not a slow metabolism, that's lack of
metabolites.
Cheers - Jaimie
Sorry, but how is that about sci-fi books?
I thought you were picking a side.
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then
perform feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR
Dominic Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least
partly to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced
that would keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David
Drake's RCN universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera
maintains unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I
think more recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with
more in the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have
been more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in
Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first
boyfriend lets himself go to seed both physically and morally.
Post by Robert Carnegie
_The First Men in the Moon_ arrive and start jumping
around, but they wait a while in their capsule first.
(I think the Apollo 11 crew did about the same thing.)
It's stated that upon returning from the Moon to
the Earth, considerable fatigue follows.
Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
However he also has a centrifuge, on which he jogs.
The set was essentially a Ferris wheel, turning at the
appropriate speed to keep the jogger always on the bottom.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jerry Brown
2020-03-21 17:14:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 11:33:54 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 08:22:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
<snip>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
OBSF - SF heroes who spend days cooped up in Spaceships and then perform feats of physical co-ordination, strength, and endurance. ISTR Dominic Flandry had a routine of isometric exercise intended at least partly to maintain a physique attractive to women. I'm not convinced that would keep his cardio-vascular system in trim, myself. In David Drake's RCN universe Starship riggers are basically gymnasts, but Tovera maintains unusual strength for her size by no very obvious means. I think more recent SF tends to provide its heroes (and now heroines) with more in the way of practice and exercise, as the importance of both have been more appreciated in society - but even in the golden age, in Schmitz's stories, it is a plot point that Trigger Argee's first boyfriend lets himself go to seed both physically and morally.
_The First Men in the Moon_ arrive and start jumping
around, but they wait a while in their capsule first.
(I think the Apollo 11 crew did about the same thing.)
It's stated that upon returning from the Moon to
the Earth, considerable fatigue follows.
Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
However he also has a centrifuge, on which he jogs.
He's jogging opposite to spinwards: lazy git!
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Jack Bohn
2020-03-22 23:33:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 11:33:54 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 08:22:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
However he also has a centrifuge, on which he jogs.
He's jogging opposite to spinwards: lazy git!
Hmm... What have we got, here?
How fast is jogging? Say 6 mph, about 10 km/hour? If the centrifuge set is 40 feet tall, about 12 m diameter, they're spinning it between 4 and 4 and a half revolutions per minute, generating a bit more than 0.1 g. As you say, Gary Lockwood feels none of it, but if Keir Dullea were strapped to a chair, he'd feel 110% heavier at the bottom, but, fortunately, only 90% upside down at the top. (Somewhere he would feel normal gravity, the vector diagram would be an isosceles triangle.) They say rotating that set was accompanied by the sounds of broken bulbs and lost screws; I wonder if there was also a debris field to the side.

How much gravity do they have on the Discovery? I see two scenes along the axis to the centrifuge. While Poole is exercising, Bowman comes along (reflected in HAL's eye) I see about half a rotation in about 11 seconds. Later, after the birthday party, we get a full rotation in about 21 seconds. Maybe he was jogging slower. About 3 RPM gives about 6% of a g. Kubrick hasn't shown the effects of lower gravity, on, say, the Moon, (imagine the possible comic effects of Heywood Floyd trying to stand up and walk to the front of the low-ceilinged conference room!) but that does seem to be a bit too light.
--
-Jack
Jerry Brown
2020-03-23 07:08:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 16:33:38 -0700 (PDT), Jack Bohn
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Jerry Brown
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 11:33:54 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 08:22:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Exercise in space is shown in the film _2001_; jogging.
However he also has a centrifuge, on which he jogs.
He's jogging opposite to spinwards: lazy git!
Hmm... What have we got, here?
How fast is jogging? Say 6 mph, about 10 km/hour? If the centrifuge set is 40 feet tall, about 12 m diameter, they're spinning it between 4 and 4 and a half revolutions per minute, generating a bit more than 0.1 g. As you say, Gary Lockwood feels none of it, but if Keir Dullea were strapped to a chair, he'd feel 110% heavier at the bottom, but, fortunately, only 90% upside down at the top. (Somewhere he would feel normal gravity, the vector diagram would be an isosceles triangle.) They say rotating that set was accompanied by the sounds of broken bulbs and lost screws; I wonder if there was also a debris field to the side.
Well, I was thinking along Watsonian lines rather than Doylist; I
could see from the hub entry and the position of the ladder that he is
jogging opposite to the spin, so he's definitely going to be lighter
the faster he runs.
Post by Jack Bohn
How much gravity do they have on the Discovery? I see two scenes along the axis to the centrifuge. While Poole is exercising, Bowman comes along (reflected in HAL's eye) I see about half a rotation in about 11 seconds. Later, after the birthday party, we get a full rotation in about 21 seconds. Maybe he was jogging slower. About 3 RPM gives about 6% of a g. Kubrick hasn't shown the effects of lower gravity, on, say, the Moon, (imagine the possible comic effects of Heywood Floyd trying to stand up and walk to the front of the low-ceilinged conference room!) but that does seem to be a bit too light.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Dan Tilque
2020-03-20 17:05:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption


[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
--
Dan Tilque
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-20 20:52:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
Also, any muscle mass you succeed in building consumes energy even when
not being actively used. This increase in metabolic level is relatively
small but non-negligible.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
h***@gmail.com
2020-03-21 08:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
D B Davis
2020-03-21 11:55:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise
gene rally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate
spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
Allow me to share some anecdotal evidence with the group. It's
predictable for me to lose two to four pounds bicycling up the mountain
on a hot summer day. A lot of that is sweat. My wife tells me that a
dancer, Michael Flatley for instance, can lose up to five pounds over
the course of one performance.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Jack Bohn
2020-03-21 14:42:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.
And maybe the thin air? How high up are you? :)
--
-Jack
D B Davis
2020-03-21 15:33:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.
And maybe the thin air? How high up are you? :)
Good point. The summit elevation's 8,130 feet. People who live at lower
elevations need weeks, at best, to acclimatize themselves to the
altitude.
Casper sits at about 5,000'. So, it's about a 3,000' vertical climb
to reach the mountain top.
After you reach the hairpin turns, it's not too bad, despite the
steep grade. It's the miles of foothills that wear you down along the
way. Part of my new self imposed training regime this season is to make
a 5-7 miles rough circle through the foothills every day. That task
takes less than an hour. OTOH it takes almost two hours to reach the
summit.



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-21 18:10:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise
gene rally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate
spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
Allow me to share some anecdotal evidence with the group. It's
predictable for me to lose two to four pounds bicycling up the mountain
on a hot summer day. A lot of that is sweat. My wife tells me that a
dancer, Michael Flatley for instance, can lose up to five pounds over
the course of one performance.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.
Harold Soloman was a professional tennis player of the 1970s, with a highest
world ranking of number 5 in 1980. He was largely a defensive player,
nick-named "the human backboard". Some of the best tennis of his career was
at the 1976 French Open, where he lost in the final to Adriano Panatta,
after beating Guillermo Villas and Raul Ramirez. The following is from
Curry Kirkpatrick's account in _Sports Illustrated_:

Before he put away Taroczy, Ramirez had swept quietly through four matches
with the loss of only 19 games. On the other hand, his semifinals opponent,
Solomon, had acted out his usual passion play in Paris, rallying from
desperate straits in three different matches. When he reached the quarterfinal
against the ever-brilliant Guillermo Vilas, Solomon was psyched up and ready
to attack.

"I'm smacking it as hard as I can for as long as I can," Solomon said. "I'm
going to win or they'll have to carry me out on a stretcher."

The two groundstroke specialists began their hammer and spin contest from
the baselines early in the evening, splitting two one-sided sets before
Vilas arrived at 6-all in the third set, 6-5 in the tie break, set point.
The Argentine blasted a certain forehand winner into the corner, but
Solomon raced four feet out of court to jerk a two-fisted backhand down
the line past Vilas' racket and into the hearts of little men everywhere.
Dispirited, Vilas made two errors to lose the set, then succumbed completely
in the fourth under the gathering shadows.

By that time most of the players and officials were enjoying their tennis
night at the Moulin Rouge featuring an assortment of jugglers, acrobats,
performing dolphins and a certain amount of naked flesh. But Solomon had left
a ton of his own out there in the dirt. "I'll never forget that backhand,"
he said after his 6-1, 0-6, 7-6, 6-1 victory. "I pulled that one out of you
know where."

He still had a few left for Ramirez in the semis. Again it was an intense,
even struggle. Again Solomon fell behind. And again in a key sequence he
pulled off some marvelous shots to swing the match. This time Ramirez led
in the fifth set 4-2 and was serving at 40-15, one point from a 5-2 margin.
But the Mexican chose to serve and go to the net, and he was punished for it.

After four successive gutsy Solomon winners—the last a slashing overhead
backhand volley—Ramirez appeared to be stunned. Solomon had broken back to
3-4 and he ran out the set with the loss of only four more points and won
6-7, 6-0, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.

The courtside temperature was posted as 52° Centigrade, which would be over
125° Fahrenheit, which would be ridiculous. Or would it? "I drank 22 bottles
of water and lost nine pounds," said Solomon, who weighed 138' before the
match. "I've never in my life been so exhausted."

I seem to recall reading that the water bottles were about a half-pint
each, which would correct for a quarter-liter. Assuming 250 milliliters,
22 bottles would be twelve pounds, so he sweated off 21 pounds total.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-21 20:31:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise
gene rally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate
spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
Allow me to share some anecdotal evidence with the group. It's
predictable for me to lose two to four pounds bicycling up the mountain
on a hot summer day. A lot of that is sweat. My wife tells me that a
dancer, Michael Flatley for instance, can lose up to five pounds over
the course of one performance.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.
Plus dehydration... which doesn't count as "proper"
weight loss, and I don't think you claimed it does.

Did we cover that at altitude you weigh less?
D B Davis
2020-03-21 21:03:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by D B Davis
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise
gene rally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate
spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
Allow me to share some anecdotal evidence with the group. It's
predictable for me to lose two to four pounds bicycling up the mountain
on a hot summer day. A lot of that is sweat. My wife tells me that a
dancer, Michael Flatley for instance, can lose up to five pounds over
the course of one performance.
In my case, the bike ride has to go all the way up to the top of the
mountain in order to melt away pounds. Rolling around in the foothills,
even uphill, doesn't do it.
The summit makes me golden. When my _Perry Rhodan_'s pulled out and
read something magical happens. My consciousness travels back in time;
regresses to the golden age of science fiction once more. An age when
limitless energy was on tap. An age when the world was full of limitless
possibilities.
It's the endorphins, you see, and apparently also EPOC, as pointed
out above. An endorphin high with a EPOC kicker.
Plus dehydration... which doesn't count as "proper"
weight loss, and I don't think you claimed it does.
Did we cover that at altitude you weigh less?
The scale's in my house at the base of the mountain. In regards to
dehydration, my bike holds two water bottles, which are inevitably
emptied on the way up. ...


.. For high's sake, don't tell anyone, but they're filled with chilled
coffee. Although coffee's normally a diuretic my body's so thirsty that
there is no need to vent, which is handy given foothills that offer no
cover and alpine forests observed by watchful eyes in cabins.



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Dan Tilque
2020-03-22 10:16:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
It's about 3500 calories to lose 1lb of fat
Cycling is 450-750 calories per hour.
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
Losing weight and keeping it off is damned tough
You apparently are unaware of EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen
consumption). If you exercise hard enough, your metabolism is raised for
a period afterwards[1] and you burn more calories than normal. The key
is the exercise has to be hard. Interval training or climbing steep
hills on a bike, for example. Moderate exercise, which for some reason
is usually recommended, won't do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excess_post-exercise_oxygen_consumption
[1] 14 hours according to one study I saw. The subjects of that study
were non-athlete college students doing what I consider to be vigorous,
but not extreme, exercise. I think most professional athletes, when in
training, are in a state of constant EPOC.
https://www.livestrong.com/article/485498-does-exercise-raise-your-metabolic-rate-for-several-hours-after-the-workout/
suggests an average of an extra 190 calories from basal metabolic rate spread over 14 hours.
So we're looking at the aftereffects of about 18 sessions to burn a lb of fat.
Only if you exercise at the rate those subjects were doing, which as I
said, was not extreme. Further research shows that the amount lost goes
up with intensity of exercise. In fact, it's an exponential relationship
between the intensity and the amount of EPOC. Very high intense
intervals (80% of VO2max), which will be the case for climbing steep
hills on a bike, will give the best results. Steep hills here means 10%
grade or better.

Apparently, there's also a relationship between when you eat and when
you exercise that can increase EPOC. Eating more before the ride seems
to be best.
Post by h***@gmail.com
https://www.precor.com/en/resources/coaching-centre/afterburn-effect-understanding-science-epoc>
--
Dan Tilque
Joy Beeson
2020-03-21 03:37:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
So it's a lot of time needed, then there's the point that the exercise generally does make you eat more...
When I was training, I considered one of my high-calorie muffins to be
a heavy meal during a ride. On rest days, one muffin was a light
snack.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-20 14:27:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by m***@sky.com
Reducing fat is most easily accomplished with diet, not exercise.
Depends on how much exercise you do. Do enough vigorous exercise and
you'll lose weight. Most people don't do enough exercise of any sort.
Personally, I ride about two and a half, maybe three hours at a time. I
don't bother to watch my calorie consumption. A couple years ago I made
a very rough calculation that I eat about 4000 calories/day and my diet
hasn't changed much since then. Yet my weight is roughly stable, varying
between winter when it goes up about 10-15 pounds versus summer, when I
burn that excess off.
Post by m***@sky.com
Personally, I like to cycle uphill as fast as I possibly can for
relatively short periods of condensed exercise. Announcing at the start
"I feel the need... the need for Speed!" is optional :-).
I do pretty much the same. It's much the same as doing intervals when
running. When I'm in shape, (I get somewhat out of shape every winter)
the steeper the hill the better. And to an extent, the longer the hill
the better.
I don't plan on letting this epidemic change my cycling habits.
It's cool that you can do that; keep on. I can't even go out for
a walk, which various sources have been recommending it: I live
on top of a hill and have fallen down it twice.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-18 23:09:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.
Alternatively you could adapt your stockpile of
canned food... until you have to use the food
of course.
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-19 01:00:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.
Alternatively you could adapt your stockpile of
canned food... until you have to use the food
of course.
There was a piece on the news yesterday demonstrating exercises one
can do with common household items such as jugs of water and scraps
of carpet.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Paul S Person
2020-03-19 17:21:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed at least until early April in the
administration's "fight disease with flab" initiative. I went to a
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness store to get some basic weights and the
other four customers were all there because of the gym shutdowns. The
store's inventory was really depleted. One guy was buying a bench, an
Olympic bar, a set of plates, and two 100 pound incremental dumb bells,
well over $1,000.00 in total. The gym closure was just announced the
day before.
Sounds like a high-quality policy. Still, it should help people keep
warm, with all that blubber. AFAIK, Minnesotta isn't exactly warm,
most of the time.

I've never understood the concept of the "gym". Jogging (back when my
back allowed it) and walking are /my/ idea of "exercise".

And that doesn't cost anything like $1000. Well, unless you like to
show off.

OTOH, there is nothing wrong with dropping $1000 on a hobby that you
can't pursue any other way.
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
http://youtu.be/nbxa4PF4Ku8
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
m***@sky.com
2020-03-20 05:36:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
William Hyde
Working from home of course changes how people work and collaborate dramatically. I note that Isaac Newton discovered gravity while away from London due to the plague. (and a search to confirm this shows that I am not the first person to notice this - https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2020/03/12/during-pandemic-isaac-newton-had-work-home-too-he-used-time-wisely/). I don't claim that the scientific community will work better dispersed - but it might work enough different to shake out a few novelties that wouldn't otherwise have been found.
Dan Tilque
2020-03-20 07:24:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Working from home of course changes how people work and collaborate dramatically. I note that Isaac Newton discovered gravity while away from London due to the plague. (and a search to confirm this shows that I am not the first person to notice this - https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2020/03/12/during-pandemic-isaac-newton-had-work-home-too-he-used-time-wisely/). I don't claim that the scientific community will work better dispersed - but it might work enough different to shake out a few novelties that wouldn't otherwise have been found.
I understand George RR Martin is getting more work done on the next book
because of social distancing. He shut down a couple side projects so he
has more time to write.

<https://www.gamespot.com/articles/george-rr-martin-is-working-on-winds-of-winter-dur/1100-6474901/>
--
Dan Tilque
s***@yahoo.com
2020-03-20 13:37:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I lost a few pounds when my furnace was off for a few months, and the room temperature was about 40f.
William Hyde
2020-03-27 20:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Part one of a one part series.
[I gave up on imitating Defoe's prose - the result was embarrassingly bad]
I decided to do some grocery shopping last Friday, in the lull between the morning and evening rushes. In particular I needed some frozen vegetables. This section, alas, had been all but cleaned out. No broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale, onions, or corn.
But there was ... Asian blend. Bags and bags of this, a mixture of peppers, beans, small corn, the very vegetables that were otherwise sold out.
I bought half a dozen. Was I profiting from racism? Or would it be racist not to buy? Decisions, decisions.
In the end I did snag some cauliflower, but only because I am agile and have long arms. Ableism reared its ugly head.
Jars of fruit, all with "Product of China" in fine print on the back, were all but sold out, though.
William Hyde
I had to pick up some prescriptions, so I decided to further stock up on groceries. The curious thing is that nothing was curious. The shelves were fully stocked, the only sign of anything different being the transparent shields between the customers and cashier. By the time I left there was a bit of a line-up, though. Only so many were allowed in at one time.

The pharmacy is a small one, but this being an area with many inhabitants who are great fans of quackery, it stocks some items for such as them (no homeopathic remedies - they have some pride). I noticed that such were sold out. In particular, there was not a copper bracelet to be had.

Note to self: invest in copper futures.

William Hyde

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