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OT, but reads like SF - 'Infectious organisms' are alive on board the ISS
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a425couple
2018-11-24 21:19:16 UTC
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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6424043/Infectious-organisms-alive-board-international-space-station-NASA-reveals.html

Hospital bug found on ISS! 'Infectious organisms' are alive on board the
international space station, NASA reveals
The International Space Station has been infested by a mysterious space bug
Scientists at NASA discovered five different varieties of bug called
Enterobacter
Researchers predict a 79 per cent probability that bugs could lead to
disease
By BHVISHYA PATEL FOR MAILONLINE

An ecosystem of mysterious 'infectious organisms' have been found
inhabiting the International Space Station, according to a new study.

Scientists at NASA discovered that five different varieties of
Enterobacter, a bug similar to that found in hospitals, have been found
infesting outer space, posing a risk to astronauts.

According to researchers, there is a 79 per cent probability that the
swarming bugs onboard the orbiting space station could lead to disease.

Scientists at NASA have discovered that five different varieties
Enterobacter, a bug similar to that found in hospitals, have been found
infesting the International Space Station

The myserious space bugs were found onboard the orbiting space station
and could pose a risk to astronauts

Scientists fear that astronauts could be at risk of contracting diseases
if the mysterious organisms are found to be drug-resistant.

Dr Nitin Singh, the lead author on the space bugs report, said: ‘Given
the multi-drug resistance results for these [bacteria] and the increased
chance of pathogenicity we have identified, these species potentially
pose important health considerations for future missions.’

According to researchers there is a 79 per cent probability that the
swarming bugs could lead to disease

While there are fears around the risk the bugs pose to astronauts,
scientists have said as of yet the infectious bugs do not pose a threat
to those inside the space station

Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.

Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'

Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
David Johnston
2018-11-24 22:16:33 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6424043/Infectious-organisms-alive-board-international-space-station-NASA-reveals.html
Hospital bug found on ISS! 'Infectious organisms' are alive on board the
international space station, NASA reveals
The International Space Station has been infested by a mysterious space bug
Scientists at NASA discovered  five different varieties of bug called
Enterobacter
Researchers predict a 79 per cent probability that bugs could lead to
disease
By BHVISHYA PATEL FOR MAILONLINE
An ecosystem of mysterious 'infectious organisms' have been found
inhabiting the International Space Station, according to a new study.
Scientists at NASA discovered that five different varieties of
Enterobacter, a bug similar to that found in hospitals, have been found
infesting outer space, posing a risk to astronauts.
According to researchers, there is a 79 per cent probability that the
swarming bugs onboard the orbiting space station could lead to disease.
Scientists at NASA have discovered that five different varieties
Enterobacter, a bug similar to that found in hospitals, have been found
infesting the International Space Station
The myserious space bugs were found onboard the orbiting space station
and could pose a risk to astronauts
Scientists fear that astronauts could be at risk of contracting diseases
if the mysterious organisms are found to be drug-resistant.
Dr Nitin Singh, the lead author on the space bugs report, said: ‘Given
the multi-drug resistance results for these [bacteria] and the increased
chance of pathogenicity we have identified, these species potentially
pose important health considerations for future missions.’
According to researchers there is a 79 per cent probability that the
swarming bugs could lead to disease
While there are fears around the risk the bugs pose to astronauts,
scientists have said as of yet the infectious bugs do not pose a threat
to those inside the space station
Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.
Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'
Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
Trivia note. The reason why Sandra Bullock was a medical doctor rather
than something that made sense for a character doing EVAs in "Gravity"
was because in Tess Gerritson's book "Gravity" the plot was "outbreak of
infection organisms on space station" and they didn't change that when
they changed everything else.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-11-24 23:18:15 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6424043/Infectious-organisms-alive-board-international-space-station-NASA-reveals.html
Hospital bug found on ISS! 'Infectious organisms' are alive on board the
international space station, NASA reveals
The International Space Station has been infested by a mysterious space bug
Scientists at NASA discovered five different varieties of bug called
Enterobacter
Researchers predict a 79 per cent probability that bugs could lead to
disease
By BHVISHYA PATEL FOR MAILONLINE
An ecosystem of mysterious 'infectious organisms' have been found
inhabiting the International Space Station, according to a new study.
Scientists at NASA discovered that five different varieties of
Enterobacter, a bug similar to that found in hospitals, have been found
infesting outer space, posing a risk to astronauts.
According to researchers, there is a 79 per cent probability that the
swarming bugs onboard the orbiting space station could lead to disease.
As usual for the Daily Mail this is a spectacularly awful writeup about
nothing. In the snip the 'journalist' contradicts herself multiple times
and fails to nail any danger despite continuous rabblerousing rhetoric.

They've presumably set her on the science beat in order to practice her
writing to match the house style.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.
Quadibloc
2018-11-25 07:20:00 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.
Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'
Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
It's true that there are no plane to establish a maternity ward aboard the ISS.

However, this does not mean that this is no cause for concern. These are the
micro-organisms that were detected, and they were of a type that was _not
expected_ to be found aboard the ISS. Thus, as they are related to pathogenic
organisms, even without being pathogenic themselves, their presence points to an
elevated likelihood that pathogenic organisms may either be present now, or may
become present on the ISS at some time in the future.

Basically, something is being done *wrong* in relation to the ISS which is all
too similar to what is being done wrong on all too many hospitals on Earth,
leading to patients being infected with antibiotic-resistant germs.

The fact that they've spotted it before something serious has happened gives
them a chance to stop it in time.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-11-25 07:42:52 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by a425couple
Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.
Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'
Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
It's true that there are no plane to establish a maternity ward aboard the ISS.
However, this does not mean that this is no cause for concern. These are the
micro-organisms that were detected, and they were of a type that was _not
expected_ to be found aboard the ISS. Thus, as they are related to pathogenic
organisms, even without being pathogenic themselves, their presence points to an
elevated likelihood that pathogenic organisms may either be present now, or may
become present on the ISS at some time in the future.
Basically, something is being done *wrong* in relation to the ISS which is all
too similar to what is being done wrong on all too many hospitals on Earth,
leading to patients being infected with antibiotic-resistant germs.
The fact that they've spotted it before something serious has happened gives
them a chance to stop it in time.
It took me a while, but I have now figured out what is going on here.

The organisms in questions are varieties of ENTERobacter. You know what
GastroENTERology is, don't you?

So these are germs that normally come from fecal matter. Apparently the
astronauts aren't washing their hands properly after using the bathroom.

No wonder there's concern. One sick astronaut, and we could have typhoid fever
or polio or something break out.

What is it? Are they sending up astronauts with unsanitary habits?

No; there's a much simpler culprit. Microgravity.

It's not like they _can_ wash their hands like on Earth with a stream of hot
water and a bar of soap. That would send blobs of water flying all over the
place. No; they've got to use dinky little towlettes soaked in a cleaning
solution probably including benzalkonium chloride.

So there needs to be a re-examination of the kind of zero-gravity handwashing
supplies the astronauts are getting, to more closely approach the effectiveness
of Earthly handwashing.

John Savard
a***@yahoo.com
2018-11-25 16:08:32 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by a425couple
Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.
Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'
Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
It's true that there are no plane to establish a maternity ward aboard the ISS.
However, this does not mean that this is no cause for concern. These are the
micro-organisms that were detected, and they were of a type that was _not
expected_ to be found aboard the ISS. Thus, as they are related to pathogenic
organisms, even without being pathogenic themselves, their presence points to an
elevated likelihood that pathogenic organisms may either be present now, or may
become present on the ISS at some time in the future.
Basically, something is being done *wrong* in relation to the ISS which is all
too similar to what is being done wrong on all too many hospitals on Earth,
leading to patients being infected with antibiotic-resistant germs.
The fact that they've spotted it before something serious has happened gives
them a chance to stop it in time.
It took me a while, but I have now figured out what is going on here.
The organisms in questions are varieties of ENTERobacter. You know what
GastroENTERology is, don't you?
So these are germs that normally come from fecal matter. Apparently the
astronauts aren't washing their hands properly after using the bathroom.
No wonder there's concern. One sick astronaut, and we could have typhoid fever
or polio or something break out.
What is it? Are they sending up astronauts with unsanitary habits?
No; there's a much simpler culprit. Microgravity.
It's not like they _can_ wash their hands like on Earth with a stream of hot
water and a bar of soap. That would send blobs of water flying all over the
place. No; they've got to use dinky little towlettes soaked in a cleaning
solution probably including benzalkonium chloride.
So there needs to be a re-examination of the kind of zero-gravity handwashing
supplies the astronauts are getting, to more closely approach the effectiveness
of Earthly handwashing.
If they did that, could they be charged with breaking an enteric thing?
J. Clarke
2018-11-25 13:30:01 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Nov 2018 23:20:00 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by a425couple
Despite fears around the discovery of the space bugs scientists have
stressed that as of yet the mystery organisms do not pose a threat to
the humans inside the space station.
Dr Singh added: 'It is important to understand that the strains found on
the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to
human health, but something to be monitored.'
Dr Kasthuri Venkateswaran, a microbiologist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group and corresponding author of
the study, said that three of the strains belonged to a species which
caused disease in newborn babies.
It's true that there are no plane to establish a maternity ward aboard the ISS.
However, this does not mean that this is no cause for concern. These are the
micro-organisms that were detected, and they were of a type that was _not
expected_ to be found aboard the ISS. Thus, as they are related to pathogenic
organisms, even without being pathogenic themselves, their presence points to an
elevated likelihood that pathogenic organisms may either be present now, or may
become present on the ISS at some time in the future.
How do we know what is _expected_ to exist on a space station? We
have very little experience on which to base our expectations. That
someone with no experience opines something doesn't make it a
reasonable expectation.
Post by Quadibloc
Basically, something is being done *wrong* in relation to the ISS which is all
too similar to what is being done wrong on all too many hospitals on Earth,
leading to patients being infected with antibiotic-resistant germs.
Who said anything about antibiotic-resistant?
Post by Quadibloc
The fact that they've spotted it before something serious has happened gives
them a chance to stop it in time.
Stop what? Bacteria existing where humans shit?
Scott Lurndal
2018-11-25 22:06:01 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/
Ah, never mind....

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