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033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlai Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:03:07 UTC
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033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlaí Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas

This book had more potential than it actually delivered. Apart
from the often slow pace, I think the biggest problem with this
book as the very hazy stellar geography and tech. The scale of
distance was very inconsistent, with one line of dialog implying
the characters were in a completely different galaxy than they had
started out in while at other times the captain could call for ships
from her "home" planet and they would show up within hours. The
method of travel was never really laid out either with hyperspatial
gates suddenly being referred to without having been introduced
before, but travel home from a big battle at a gate apparently not
using them. It's not important that the tech in an SF story be
plausible, but it does have to be presented and be consistent. The
same goes for the stellar geography.

There were also a lot of fairly obvious questions that didn't get
asked. For instance, the Captain suddenly finds herself in possession
of a very famous (or infamous) ship, but the question of what
happened to the former owners and crew (who apparently were quite
successful at their trade) never comes up.

I had thought while I was reading the book, that it was probably a
first novel and had potential despite the problems, and was going
to pick up the second in the series to see if the author was still
improving, but at the end of the book I found a list of a good
number of her previous books, so I suspect she is not going to get
better, and I will probably not buy the next book in the series.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 08:53:44 UTC
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033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlaí Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas
This book had more potential than it actually delivered. Apart
from the often slow pace, I think the biggest problem with this
book as the very hazy stellar geography and tech. The scale of
distance was very inconsistent, with one line of dialog implying
the characters were in a completely different galaxy than they had
started out in while at other times the captain could call for ships
from her "home" planet and they would show up within hours. The
method of travel was never really laid out either with hyperspatial
gates suddenly being referred to without having been introduced
before, but travel home from a big battle at a gate apparently not
using them. It's not important that the tech in an SF story be
plausible, but it does have to be presented and be consistent. The
same goes for the stellar geography.
There were also a lot of fairly obvious questions that didn't get
asked. For instance, the Captain suddenly finds herself in possession
of a very famous (or infamous) ship, but the question of what
happened to the former owners and crew (who apparently were quite
successful at their trade) never comes up.
I had thought while I was reading the book, that it was probably a
first novel and had potential despite the problems, and was going
to pick up the second in the series to see if the author was still
improving, but at the end of the book I found a list of a good
number of her previous books, so I suspect she is not going to get
better, and I will probably not buy the next book in the series.
Unless the lead character's name coincidentally is
Captain Wench, I have possibly detected a problem
of tone.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-24 12:08:37 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlai Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas
This book had more potential than it actually delivered. Apart
from the often slow pace, I think the biggest problem with this
book as the very hazy stellar geography and tech. The scale of
distance was very inconsistent, with one line of dialog implying
the characters were in a completely different galaxy than they had
started out in while at other times the captain could call for ships
from her "home" planet and they would show up within hours. The
method of travel was never really laid out either with hyperspatial
gates suddenly being referred to without having been introduced
before, but travel home from a big battle at a gate apparently not
using them. It's not important that the tech in an SF story be
plausible, but it does have to be presented and be consistent. The
same goes for the stellar geography.
There were also a lot of fairly obvious questions that didn't get
asked. For instance, the Captain suddenly finds herself in possession
of a very famous (or infamous) ship, but the question of what
happened to the former owners and crew (who apparently were quite
successful at their trade) never comes up.
I had thought while I was reading the book, that it was probably a
first novel and had potential despite the problems, and was going
to pick up the second in the series to see if the author was still
improving, but at the end of the book I found a list of a good
number of her previous books, so I suspect she is not going to get
better, and I will probably not buy the next book in the series.
Unless the lead character's name coincidentally is
Captain Wench, I have possibly detected a problem
of tone.
The infamous ship she acquired was "Warrior Wench", a former spacegoing
brothel.

She shook her head to clear away the ghosts and let the
door slide shut. She was half-way to the airlock before she
thought to check the ident chip for the ship.

The official name and all of a ship's history was stored
in those idents, and even she hadn't found a way to change
them for long. The Commonwealth kept tight controls over
ship names for security purposes. The ident should be in
the code pad Skrankle gave her, but it wasn't in the first
dozen documents on file. After a judicious bashing of
Skrankle's code pad against the bulkhead when it tried to
die on her, Vas managed to find the ship's identity.

Her swearing at the ship's name would have peeled the paint
off the bulkhead if this ship hadn't been upgraded with the
top of the line sealant. That explained the over-the-top
upgrades.

She ran out of the ship and kicked open the door to Skrankle's
office. "What the hell are you trying to pull? That's the
Warrior Wench. I can't be seen taking my people for mercenary
jobs in a brothel cruiser. Get me another ship."

The corners of his mouth twitched, but he stopped before a
full smile appeared. "Sorry. Only ship. Gallant-class
cruisers hard to find right now."
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 15:02:53 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlai Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas
This book had more potential than it actually delivered. Apart
from the often slow pace, I think the biggest problem with this
book as the very hazy stellar geography and tech. The scale of
distance was very inconsistent, with one line of dialog implying
the characters were in a completely different galaxy than they had
started out in while at other times the captain could call for ships
from her "home" planet and they would show up within hours. The
method of travel was never really laid out either with hyperspatial
gates suddenly being referred to without having been introduced
before, but travel home from a big battle at a gate apparently not
using them. It's not important that the tech in an SF story be
plausible, but it does have to be presented and be consistent. The
same goes for the stellar geography.
There were also a lot of fairly obvious questions that didn't get
asked. For instance, the Captain suddenly finds herself in possession
of a very famous (or infamous) ship, but the question of what
happened to the former owners and crew (who apparently were quite
successful at their trade) never comes up.
I had thought while I was reading the book, that it was probably a
first novel and had potential despite the problems, and was going
to pick up the second in the series to see if the author was still
improving, but at the end of the book I found a list of a good
number of her previous books, so I suspect she is not going to get
better, and I will probably not buy the next book in the series.
Unless the lead character's name coincidentally is
Captain Wench, I have possibly detected a problem
of tone.
The infamous ship she acquired was "Warrior Wench", a former spacegoing
brothel.
Goodness gracious me.

But it seems an unusual name in that case as well.
If I was registering a business name... well,
I haven't researched the field, and I'm not a member
of the society in which this ship - er - served,
but...... maybe /before/ that it was a fighting
ship, commanded by Captain Wench. And it did not
occur to him that the name was open to other
interpretations. Not until too late to reconsider.

Or it's named after the famous novel...

I mean, a Klingon sex cruiser might be named
"Warrior Wench", and able to prove it. But...

Well, you said there are problems.
David Johnston
2020-03-27 00:17:49 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
033 Warrior Wench (The Asarlaí Wars) (Volume 1) by Marie Andreas
This book had more potential than it actually delivered. Apart
from the often slow pace, I think the biggest problem with this
book as the very hazy stellar geography and tech. The scale of
distance was very inconsistent, with one line of dialog implying
the characters were in a completely different galaxy than they had
started out in while at other times the captain could call for ships
from her "home" planet and they would show up within hours. The
method of travel was never really laid out either with hyperspatial
gates suddenly being referred to without having been introduced
before, but travel home from a big battle at a gate apparently not
using them. It's not important that the tech in an SF story be
plausible, but it does have to be presented and be consistent. The
same goes for the stellar geography.
There were also a lot of fairly obvious questions that didn't get
asked. For instance, the Captain suddenly finds herself in possession
of a very famous (or infamous) ship, but the question of what
happened to the former owners and crew (who apparently were quite
successful at their trade) never comes up.
I had thought while I was reading the book, that it was probably a
first novel and had potential despite the problems, and was going
to pick up the second in the series to see if the author was still
improving, but at the end of the book I found a list of a good
number of her previous books, so I suspect she is not going to get
better, and I will probably not buy the next book in the series.
Unless the lead character's name coincidentally is
Captain Wench, I have possibly detected a problem
of tone.
I assume that's the name of the famous pirate ship.

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