Discussion:
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-22 02:11:20 UTC
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205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell

Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..

I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-03-22 19:32:21 UTC
Permalink
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.

I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.

Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
'I use a heap based stack storage system with a sorting algorithm which has
a major sort key being chronologically determined, and heap hash key being
a combination of gravity influenced kinetic displacement with frictive and
annoyance dispersive elements.' -- krin_o_o_'s library filing method
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-22 19:53:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.
I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.
Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.
I think I have enough "go ons" that I will pick this series back up..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2020-03-22 20:06:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.
I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.
Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.
This is one of my favorite series. It also makes an excellent
counterpoint with the OTHER magical PI in Chicago series, Harry Dresden.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Chris Buckley
2020-03-22 22:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.
I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.
Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.
This is one of my favorite series. It also makes an excellent
counterpoint with the OTHER magical PI in Chicago series, Harry Dresden.
I haven't read Marmell's series, but if you want yet another axis
counterpoint book about Fae (all the standard species) in a
Prohibition-type setting (actually post-crash) in Chicago, you might
try _The Last Hot Time_ by John M. Ford. Excellent world-building,
all in the background of a strongly character-driven book. It's in
my Favorites bookcase, highly recommended but won't appeal to everybody.

Chris
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-03-22 23:31:37 UTC
Permalink
On 22 Mar 2020 at 20:06:46 GMT, ""Sea Wasp" <Ryk E. Spoor)"
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.
I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.
Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.
This is one of my favorite series. It also makes an excellent
counterpoint with the OTHER magical PI in Chicago series, Harry Dresden.
Nodnod. They definitely make a good pairing. Do I recall correctly that
Butcher's bumped through his writer's block and there's another one due soon?

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Reality is what doesn't go away when you stop believing in it"
-- Philip K Dick
h***@gmail.com
2020-03-23 01:40:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 20:06:46 GMT, ""Sea Wasp" <Ryk E. Spoor)"
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 22 Mar 2020 at 02:11:20 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
205 Hot Lead, Cold Iron: A Mick Oberon Job Book 1 by Ari Marmell
Here's a high concept: Make an exiled Fae a shamus in Prohibition
era Chicago. That's Mick Oberon (not O'Brian, thank you very much!)
our first person and fairly hard-boiled narrator. Not many people
realize Mick is a bit more than what he seems, but you know, those
Italians from the Old Country know a bit more than most, and Mick,
needing a big job quite badly, ends up working for a Mobster,
searching for a missing daughter who was probably the human side
of a changeling swap some 18 years ago. To find her, he'll have
to go back to Faery, a place he foreswore long agon, and then face
a completely unexpected threat on our side..
I'm on the line about Mick after two books. Being in our world
*hurts* him and he's always in a bad mood. The period is nice, and
there are some good moments in this book, but I kind of wish Mick
would cheer up every now and then, oh, and stop insulting humans
in his constant asides.
I've been enjoying these - they're a bit power-rampup in the overarching
storyline, but that can be explained by Fae power-begets-power and attracts
other powers like moths to a flame sort of excuse. Which is fair.
I rather like the insulting asides. Humans are pretty rubbish.
Book 4 does well in bringing things together and then making way for more plot
for 5, not in an aggravating cliffhanger way but if you're feeling a bit down
on the series I'd probably suggest wait until 5 is out as well before
continuing. A break will refresh you.
This is one of my favorite series. It also makes an excellent
counterpoint with the OTHER magical PI in Chicago series, Harry Dresden.
Nodnod. They definitely make a good pairing. Do I recall correctly that
Butcher's bumped through his writer's block and there's another one due soon?
Peace Talks is coming out on the 14th of July this year

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