Discussion:
Uh oh, I bounced off this book
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Lynn McGuire
2018-11-02 18:29:03 UTC
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Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/

Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-02 19:16:41 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the fifties,
when it was a new and frightening concept.

And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.

(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson," adhered to
by some people in rural Northern California and rural Southern
Oregon. They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've
been trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-02 20:02:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the fifties,
when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson," adhered to
by some people in rural Northern California and rural Southern
Oregon. They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've
been trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more of a
Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-02 22:18:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the fifties,
when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson," adhered to
by some people in rural Northern California and rural Southern
Oregon. They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've
been trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more of a
Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-11-02 22:55:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the fifties,
when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson," adhered to
by some people in rural Northern California and rural Southern
Oregon. They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've
been trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more of a
Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento and
Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The protests
were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.

Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along with
rural concerns.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-state-of-jefferson-activists-20180317-htmlstory.html

Great flag, though:

https://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/us-jeff.html

The 2 "Xs" stand for a "double cross."

My favorite "disunited States" stories are Ron Goulart's
"Fragmented America" series. A bit dated, now, but funny!

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pe.cgi?14261

---
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-02 23:18:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp
/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State and
not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna
happen either, they've been trying for a long time, but they
just don't have the population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more
of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-11-03 01:41:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp
/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State and
not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna
happen either, they've been trying for a long time, but they
just don't have the population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more
of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had representation
in the State Senate done by some formula like "one member from each county".
This had the effect it has in the US Senate where populous states can't
run completely roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-03 19:10:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/
dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State
and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not
gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long time,
but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in the
US Senate where populous states can't run completely roughshod
over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims"
put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations
like California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to bend
Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a pretty
extreme situation, but it's there.

A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily turn
into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have always
been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago, over
Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war with
Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you - if the
feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-05 18:44:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/
dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State
and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not
gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long time,
but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in the
US Senate where populous states can't run completely roughshod
over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims"
put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations
like California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to bend
Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a pretty
extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily turn
into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have always
been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago, over
Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war with
Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you - if the
feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build an
enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 18:26:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkol
y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs. The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds
v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where the
population has no way to have their concerns addressed in the
state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war
with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you -
if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of way,
I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism and
drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear *anything*.
In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to build nuclear power
plants, and desal plants are automatically suspect because the fish
who live near where the brine gets pumped out are obviously *far*
more important than people.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-05 20:04:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkol
y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs. The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds
v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where the
population has no way to have their concerns addressed in the
state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war
with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you -
if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of way,
I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism and
drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear *anything*.
In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to build nuclear power
plants, and desal plants are automatically suspect because the fish
who live near where the brine gets pumped out are obviously *far*
more important than people.
Ah, I assumed that there was some degree of common sense in California.
I will try not to make that mistake again.

Lynn
Alan Baker
2018-11-05 20:38:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Uh oh, I bounced off this book.  _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
      https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkol
      y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon.  They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.  That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that.  I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly.  In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs.  The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds
v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where the
population has no way to have their concerns addressed in the
state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war
with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you -
if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of way,
I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism and
drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear *anything*.
In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to build nuclear power
plants, and desal plants are automatically suspect because the fish
who live near where the brine gets pumped out are obviously *far*
more important than people.
Ah, I assumed that there was some degree of common sense in California.
I will try not to make that mistake again.
Lynn
You're assuming that because Terry wrote something that it must bear any
relationship to the facts?
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 20:20:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Uh oh, I bounced off this book.  _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
     
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkol
      y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon.  They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. 
That's not gonna happen either, they've been trying
for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that.  I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly.  In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs.  The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some formula
like "one member from each county". This had the effect it
has in the US Senate where populous states can't run
completely roughshod over the interests of rural states.
1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely
IMHO, and now you have situations like California and
Upstate New York where the population has no way to have
their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of
way, I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism
and drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear
*anything*. In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to
build nuclear power plants, and desal plants are automatically
suspect because the fish who live near where the brine gets
pumped out are obviously *far* more important than people.
Ah, I assumed that there was some degree of common sense in
California. I will try not to make that mistake again.
Lynn
You're assuming that because Terry wrote something that it must
bear any relationship to the facts?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-05 21:30:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Let's put my last text next to this...
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
You're assuming that because Terry wrote something that it must
bear any relationship to the facts?
:-)
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 21:50:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Let's put my last text next to this...
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
You're assuming that because Terry wrote something that it must
bear any relationship to the facts?
:-)
Pretending you're kidding makes you look stupid.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-06 22:17:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Let's put my last text next to this...
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
You're assuming that because Terry wrote something that it must
bear any relationship to the facts?
This whole topic, at least in the latest few dozen contributions,
is a good indicator of people that it's a mistake even to read.

Which I'd been thinking of as an "evangelists writing in alt.atheism"
thing - the sort of "evangelists" who in fact are /not/ good news.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 20:20:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Kon
kol y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make
it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and
now you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California
have always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many
years ago, over Colorado River water would have turned into a
shooting war with Arizona - they were both states at that
point, mind you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops
of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of
way, I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism
and drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear
*anything*. In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to build
nuclear power plants, and desal plants are automatically
suspect because the fish who live near where the brine gets
pumped out are obviously *far* more important than people.
Ah, I assumed that there was some degree of common sense in
California.
Why on earth would you assume that? Have you suffered a serious
head injury recently? Californians are entirely capable of getting
very worked up over things that matter - don't mess with our cars,
for instance - and actually *do* something, dammit!, but will
generally choose the stupidest possible response.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I will try not to make that mistake again.
Heh.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 00:01:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Uh oh, I bounced off this book.  _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
      https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkol
      y/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon.  They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.  That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that.  I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly.  In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs.  The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds
v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where the
population has no way to have their concerns addressed in the
state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war
with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you -
if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
Interesting in a "stupidly disconnected from reality" sort of way,
I suppose. Californians will likely resort to cannibalism and
drinking on another's blood before they build a nuclear *anything*.
In fact, it is currently just flat illegal to build nuclear power
plants, and desal plants are automatically suspect because the fish
who live near where the brine gets pumped out are obviously *far*
more important than people.
Ah, I assumed that there was some degree of common sense in California.
I will try not to make that mistake again.
That's okay, we'll just change the definition of common sense here in
Cali so you can't avoid making the same mistake again.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-05 22:41:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/
dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State
and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not
gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long time,
but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in the
US Senate where populous states can't run completely roughshod
over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims"
put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations
like California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to bend
Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a pretty
extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily turn
into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have always
been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago, over
Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war with
Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you - if the
feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build an
enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 21:54:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konko
ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs. The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now
you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting
war with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind
you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-05 23:26:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konko
ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs. The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now
you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting
war with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind
you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean water
rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 23:00:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Ko
nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.
That's not gonna happen either, they've been trying
for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some formula
like "one member from each county". This had the effect it
has in the US Senate where populous states can't run
completely roughshod over the interests of rural states.
1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely
IMHO, and now you have situations like California and
Upstate New York where the population has no way to have
their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and
the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But
then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves
not destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean
water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.

To get a good view of what the greens spew look here:

https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages

https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald

(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here *believe*
is.)

"Desalination is bad for the environment and human health. The by-
products of desalination include coagulalants, bisulfates, and
chlorines. When concentrated waste is dumped into the ocean as it
is with desalination, it is harmful to marine life and
environments. Furthermore, power plants’ intake mechanisms, which
are often teamed with desalination plants, kill at least 3.4
billion fish and other marine organisms annually. In addition to
upsetting marine environments, desalination causes fishermen to
lose at least 165 million pounds of fish a year today and 717.1
million pounds of potential future catch."

(And other hysterical propaganda. Welcome to California. Now go
home.)

There has been some success at using reverse osmosis to reclaim
waste water (the so-called "toilets to tap" programs), but that's
whole different animal (it involves pumping the R/O water back into
the underground aquifer, not putting it directly into the system)
and on a much smaller scale.

(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the local
level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as much water as
what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it comes out. This does
actually have a detrimental effect on the local area around the
outflow pipes. It can be dealt with, but that means more $$$ on and
already obscenely expensive process.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 00:02:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Ko
nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.
That's not gonna happen either, they've been trying
for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some formula
like "one member from each county". This had the effect it
has in the US Senate where populous states can't run
completely roughshod over the interests of rural states.
1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely
IMHO, and now you have situations like California and
Upstate New York where the population has no way to have
their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and
the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But
then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves
not destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean
water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here *believe*
is.)
And we should just take your word for it that this is bullshit, should we?

Why?
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 23:47:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven
-Ko nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the
US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon. They
want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states
can't run completely roughshod over the interests of
rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to
this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like
California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state
capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
And we should just take your word for it that this is bullshit, should we?
Why?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 05:15:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies continue.
I'm willing to let others judge whether what I said was "lies"...

...but are you?

:-)
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
And we should just take your word for it that this is bullshit, should we?
Why?
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 06:23:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies continue.
I'm willing to let others judge whether what I said was "lies"...
...but are you?
:-)
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this
is.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
And we should just take your word for it that this is bullshit, should we?
Why?
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 02:03:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Ko
nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.
That's not gonna happen either, they've been trying
for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some formula
like "one member from each county". This had the effect it
has in the US Senate where populous states can't run
completely roughshod over the interests of rural states.
1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely
IMHO, and now you have situations like California and
Upstate New York where the population has no way to have
their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and
the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But
then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves
not destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean
water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here *believe*
is.)
"Desalination is bad for the environment and human health. The by-
products of desalination include coagulalants, bisulfates, and
chlorines. When concentrated waste is dumped into the ocean as it
is with desalination, it is harmful to marine life and
environments. Furthermore, power plants’ intake mechanisms, which
are often teamed with desalination plants, kill at least 3.4
billion fish and other marine organisms annually. In addition to
upsetting marine environments, desalination causes fishermen to
lose at least 165 million pounds of fish a year today and 717.1
million pounds of potential future catch."
(And other hysterical propaganda. Welcome to California. Now go
home.)
There has been some success at using reverse osmosis to reclaim
waste water (the so-called "toilets to tap" programs), but that's
whole different animal (it involves pumping the R/O water back into
the underground aquifer, not putting it directly into the system)
and on a much smaller scale.
(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the local
level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as much water as
what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it comes out. This does
actually have a detrimental effect on the local area around the
outflow pipes. It can be dealt with, but that means more $$$ on and
already obscenely expensive process.)
There is a old engineering rule, "when in doubt, dilute it more".

Just pump in more "fresh" ocean water into the outlet piping before
putting it into the ocean.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 03:26:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven
-Ko nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the
US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon. They
want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states
can't run completely roughshod over the interests of
rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to
this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like
California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state
capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
"Desalination is bad for the environment and human health. The
by- products of desalination include coagulalants, bisulfates,
and chlorines. When concentrated waste is dumped into the ocean
as it is with desalination, it is harmful to marine life and
environments. Furthermore, power plants’ intake mechanisms,
which are often teamed with desalination plants, kill at least
3.4 billion fish and other marine organisms annually. In
addition to upsetting marine environments, desalination causes
fishermen to lose at least 165 million pounds of fish a year
today and 717.1 million pounds of potential future catch."
(And other hysterical propaganda. Welcome to California. Now go
home.)
There has been some success at using reverse osmosis to reclaim
waste water (the so-called "toilets to tap" programs), but
that's whole different animal (it involves pumping the R/O
water back into the underground aquifer, not putting it
directly into the system) and on a much smaller scale.
(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the
local level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as
much water as what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it
comes out. This does actually have a detrimental effect on the
local area around the outflow pipes. It can be dealt with, but
that means more $$$ on and already obscenely expensive
process.)
There is a old engineering rule, "when in doubt, dilute it
more".
Just pump in more "fresh" ocean water into the outlet piping
before putting it into the ocean.
I suspect the people who do it for a living know it better than you
do, and they seem to think it's a bit more complicated than that.

But, again, and I'll use small words this time, even though you
obviously aren't listening, it really does not matter what the
actual facts are, or what the science says. The greens tell people
what to vote for, and (so long as it doesn't conflict with what the
unions tell people to vote for) they vote for it. If Al Gore told
Californians to vote to double their taxes to pay (the unions) to
move the earth further from the sun to counteract global warming,
it's pass in a landslide.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 05:17:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven
-Ko nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the
US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon. They
want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states
can't run completely roughshod over the interests of
rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to
this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like
California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state
capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this is.
It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
"Desalination is bad for the environment and human health. The
by- products of desalination include coagulalants, bisulfates,
and chlorines. When concentrated waste is dumped into the ocean
as it is with desalination, it is harmful to marine life and
environments. Furthermore, power plants’ intake mechanisms,
which are often teamed with desalination plants, kill at least
3.4 billion fish and other marine organisms annually. In
addition to upsetting marine environments, desalination causes
fishermen to lose at least 165 million pounds of fish a year
today and 717.1 million pounds of potential future catch."
(And other hysterical propaganda. Welcome to California. Now go
home.)
There has been some success at using reverse osmosis to reclaim
waste water (the so-called "toilets to tap" programs), but
that's whole different animal (it involves pumping the R/O
water back into the underground aquifer, not putting it
directly into the system) and on a much smaller scale.
(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the
local level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as
much water as what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it
comes out. This does actually have a detrimental effect on the
local area around the outflow pipes. It can be dealt with, but
that means more $$$ on and already obscenely expensive
process.)
There is a old engineering rule, "when in doubt, dilute it
more".
Just pump in more "fresh" ocean water into the outlet piping
before putting it into the ocean.
I suspect the people who do it for a living know it better than you
do, and they seem to think it's a bit more complicated than that.
Do YOU do this for a living?

Have you cited anyone who does this for a living?

:-)
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 06:23:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 11/5/2018 3:54 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured
State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Ste
ven -Ko nko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and
dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like,
in the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna
happen. Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest
of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon.
They want to be their own State and not be ruled
by Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that
it was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many
states had representation in the State Senate done by
some formula like "one member from each county". This
had the effect it has in the US Senate where populous
states can't run completely roughshod over the
interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims"
put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have
situations like California and Upstate New York where
the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had
California build an enormous nuclear power complex for
sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
Yes. It is an issue *now*, and has been for many years.
https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/ocean-desalination-no-
solution-water-shortages
https://tinyurl.com/yccqtald
(It doesn't matter how big a pile of stinking bullshit this
is. It's what the greens peddle to voters, and voters here
*believe* is.)
"Desalination is bad for the environment and human health.
The by- products of desalination include coagulalants,
bisulfates, and chlorines. When concentrated waste is dumped
into the ocean as it is with desalination, it is harmful to
marine life and environments. Furthermore, power
plants’ intake mechanisms, which are often teamed with
desalination plants, kill at least 3.4 billion fish and other
marine organisms annually. In addition to upsetting marine
environments, desalination causes fishermen to lose at least
165 million pounds of fish a year today and 717.1 million
pounds of potential future catch."
(And other hysterical propaganda. Welcome to California. Now
go home.)
There has been some success at using reverse osmosis to
reclaim waste water (the so-called "toilets to tap"
programs), but that's whole different animal (it involves
pumping the R/O water back into the underground aquifer, not
putting it directly into the system) and on a much smaller
scale.
(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the
local level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as
much water as what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it
comes out. This does actually have a detrimental effect on
the local area around the outflow pipes. It can be dealt
with, but that means more $$$ on and already obscenely
expensive process.)
There is a old engineering rule, "when in doubt, dilute it
more".
Just pump in more "fresh" ocean water into the outlet piping
before putting it into the ocean.
I suspect the people who do it for a living know it better than
you do, and they seem to think it's a bit more complicated than
that.
Do YOU do this for a living?
Have you cited anyone who does this for a living?
:-)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 17:34:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
I suspect the people who do it for a living know it better than
you do, and they seem to think it's a bit more complicated than
that.
Do YOU do this for a living?
Have you cited anyone who does this for a living?
:-)
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 17:02:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
I suspect the people who do it for a living know it better than
you do, and they seem to think it's a bit more complicated than
that.
Do YOU do this for a living?
Have you cited anyone who does this for a living?
:-)
Pretending you're kidding makes you look retarded.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
William Hyde
2018-11-06 20:30:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 10:26:13 PM UTC-5, Ninapenda Jibini wrote:
If Al Gore told
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Californians to vote to double their taxes to pay (the unions) to
move the earth further from the sun to counteract global warming,
it's pass in a landslide.
That would lengthen the year, hence the seasons. Summer and winter would become more extreme (Hotter summers for Texas! More Hurricanes for Lynn! Nasty winters for me!). Migratory times and patterns would be messed up, wine grapes would have to be crossed to ripen at the new proper time (there goes French support) and so on.

Then would come the protests about our sacred 365.24 day year. Religious calendars messed up! Indigenous ceremonies ruined! Nobody can agree on the date of Easter!

An international conference on the new calendar ends in fisticuffs! On the plus side, businesses report a sharp increase in quarterly profit (because there are more days in a quarter, but they keep that quiet).

Finally, the astrologers would come for you, armed with paper and protractors.

Frankly I'd rather fry.

William Hyde
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 19:43:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 10:26:13 PM UTC-5, Ninapenda
If Al Gore told
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Californians to vote to double their taxes to pay (the unions)
to move the earth further from the sun to counteract global
warming, it's pass in a landslide.
That would lengthen the year, hence the seasons. Summer and
winter would become more extreme (Hotter summers for Texas! More
Hurricanes for Lynn! Nasty winters for me!). Migratory times
and patterns would be messed up, wine grapes would have to be
crossed to ripen at the new proper time (there goes French
support) and so on.
Then would come the protests about our sacred 365.24 day year.
Religious calendars messed up! Indigenous ceremonies ruined!
Nobody can agree on the date of Easter!
An international conference on the new calendar ends in
fisticuffs! On the plus side, businesses report a sharp
increase in quarterly profit (because there are more days in a
quarter, but they keep that quiet).
(Aside from practical issues of _changing the earth's orbit_) So?
If St. Al says it's so, it's so, and anybody who claims otherwise
is a denier.

This is, as Lynn notes, Kalifornia, after all. Reality was banned
through the initiative process decades ago.
Post by William Hyde
Finally, the astrologers would come for you, armed with paper
and protractors.
And they'd bring their celebrity clients with them, and in this
state, *nobody* fucks with Hollywood.
Post by William Hyde
Frankly I'd rather fry.
So there'd be an upside?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 22:15:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by William Hyde
On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 10:26:13 PM UTC-5, Ninapenda
If Al Gore told
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Californians to vote to double their taxes to pay (the unions)
to move the earth further from the sun to counteract global
warming, it's pass in a landslide.
That would lengthen the year, hence the seasons. Summer and
winter would become more extreme (Hotter summers for Texas! More
Hurricanes for Lynn! Nasty winters for me!). Migratory times
and patterns would be messed up, wine grapes would have to be
crossed to ripen at the new proper time (there goes French
support) and so on.
Then would come the protests about our sacred 365.24 day year.
Religious calendars messed up! Indigenous ceremonies ruined!
Nobody can agree on the date of Easter!
An international conference on the new calendar ends in
fisticuffs! On the plus side, businesses report a sharp
increase in quarterly profit (because there are more days in a
quarter, but they keep that quiet).
(Aside from practical issues of _changing the earth's orbit_) So?
If St. Al says it's so, it's so, and anybody who claims otherwise
is a denier.
This is, as Lynn notes, Kalifornia, after all. Reality was banned
through the initiative process decades ago.
A little known codicil of Prop 13, wasn't it?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 21:24:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by William Hyde
On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 10:26:13 PM UTC-5, Ninapenda
If Al Gore told
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Californians to vote to double their taxes to pay (the
unions) to move the earth further from the sun to counteract
global warming, it's pass in a landslide.
That would lengthen the year, hence the seasons. Summer and
winter would become more extreme (Hotter summers for Texas!
More Hurricanes for Lynn! Nasty winters for me!). Migratory
times and patterns would be messed up, wine grapes would have
to be crossed to ripen at the new proper time (there goes
French support) and so on.
Then would come the protests about our sacred 365.24 day year.
Religious calendars messed up! Indigenous ceremonies ruined!
Nobody can agree on the date of Easter!
An international conference on the new calendar ends in
fisticuffs! On the plus side, businesses report a sharp
increase in quarterly profit (because there are more days in a
quarter, but they keep that quiet).
(Aside from practical issues of _changing the earth's orbit_)
So? If St. Al says it's so, it's so, and anybody who claims
otherwise is a denier.
This is, as Lynn notes, Kalifornia, after all. Reality was
banned through the initiative process decades ago.
A little known codicil of Prop 13, wasn't it?
That and many other small bricks in a very big wall.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Scott Lurndal
2018-11-06 14:07:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
(You're also underestimating the impact on the brine at the local
level. What goes back into the ocean is about half as much water as
what came in, so it's a *lot* saltier when it comes out. This does
actually have a detrimental effect on the local area around the
outflow pipes. It can be dealt with, but that means more $$$ on and
already obscenely expensive process.)
There is a old engineering rule, "when in doubt, dilute it more".
Just pump in more "fresh" ocean water into the outlet piping before
putting it into the ocean.
They do, of course. Why don't you read up on the process a bit
before spouting more nonsense.

The carlsbad desal plant desalinates used cooling water from the
adjacent power plant, and the brine effluent is diluted with the
remainder of the cooling water before discharge.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 00:03:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Uh oh, I bounced off this book.  _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
      https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konko
      ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon.  They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.  That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that.  I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly.  In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs.  The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now
you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting
war with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind
you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean water
rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
There is at least one group that would.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 23:52:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Uh oh, I bounced off this book.  _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
     
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konko
      ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern
California and rural Southern Oregon.  They want to
be their own State and not be ruled by Sacramento and
Salem.  That's not gonna happen either, they've been
trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that.  I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly.  In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs.  The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states can't
run completely roughshod over the interests of rural
states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this,
unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like California
and Upstate New York where the population has no way to
have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean
water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
There is at least one group that would.
And they've already spent millions on legal fees to keep any such
thing from happening.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Scott Lurndal
2018-11-06 00:08:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean water
rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for a
50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium with the
rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent on the
immediate area around the outflow?
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 02:07:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the ocean water
rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for a
50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium with the
rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent on the
immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.

And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS = total
dissolved solids and is parts per million.

If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not plug
the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to your door. Otherwise,
take a hike.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 03:29:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to your door.
Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 18:41:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to your door.
Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
Note, there are several to the west of California at about six ???
hours flying time. Some people call them Hawaii.

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 19:49:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to your door.
Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
Note, there are several to the west of California at about six ???
hours flying time. Some people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 20:01:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean?  What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS.  TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path to your door.
  Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
  Note, there are several to the west of California at about six ???
hours flying time.  Some people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 20:13:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean?  What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS.  TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path to your door.
  Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
  Note, there are several to the west of California at about six ???
hours flying time.  Some people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our needs. The
problem is that it comes rapidly over a short period of time so we are
building more and more water retention lakes for long term water needs.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 19:37:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On 11/5/2018 3:54 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean?  What is the
effect of the effluent on the immediate area around the
outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS. 
TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a
fuck if there's a solution or not, technology is the second
most evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human
beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow
and not plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path
to your door.   Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through
a volcano.   Note, there are several to the west of
California at about six ??? hours flying time.  Some people
call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our needs.
The problem is that it comes rapidly over a short period of
time so we are building more and more water retention lakes for
long term water needs.
California has plenty of water, too, if you get rid of the various
environmental uses and force farmers to stop wasting it in the most
inefficient way to irrigate known to man.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 22:12:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean? What is the
effect of the effluent on the immediate area around the
outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS.Â
TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a
fuck if there's a solution or not, technology is the second
most evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human
beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow
and not plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path
to your door. Â Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through
a volcano. Â Note, there are several to the west of
California at about six ??? hours flying time. Some people
call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our needs.
The problem is that it comes rapidly over a short period of
time so we are building more and more water retention lakes for
long term water needs.
California has plenty of water, too, if you get rid of the various
environmental uses and force farmers to stop wasting it in the most
inefficient way to irrigate known to man.
And on the most water intensive luxury food crops.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 22:13:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean?  What is the
effect of the effluent on the immediate area around the
outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS.Â
TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a
fuck if there's a solution or not, technology is the second
most evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human
beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow
and not plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path
to your door.   Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through
a volcano.   Note, there are several to the west of
California at about six ??? hours flying time.  Some people
call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our needs.
  The problem is that it comes rapidly over a short period of
time so we are building more and more water retention lakes for
long term water needs.
California has plenty of water, too, if you get rid of the various
environmental uses and force farmers to stop wasting it in the most
inefficient way to irrigate known to man.
And on the most water intensive luxury food crops.
Do we really need that many almonds?

:-)
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 21:23:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On 11/5/2018 3:54 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself,
because it produces large amounts of brine that has
to go *somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it
going back into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the
greens are opposed to anything that involves not
destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of
the ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001
TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it
take for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to
reach equilibrium with the rest of the ocean?  What is
the effect of the effluent on the immediate area around
the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000
TDS. TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per
million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously
you masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with
it, but a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby
gives a fuck if there's a solution or not, technology is
the second most evil thing that has ever existed, right
behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow
and not plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a
path to your door.   Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course,
it does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even
give people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into
the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe
through a volcano.   Note, there are several to the west
of California at about six ??? hours flying time.  Some
people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to
Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our
needs.   The problem is that it comes rapidly over a short
period of time so we are building more and more water
retention lakes for long term water needs.
California has plenty of water, too, if you get rid of the
various environmental uses and force farmers to stop wasting
it in the most inefficient way to irrigate known to man.
And on the most water intensive luxury food crops.
Do we really need that many almonds?
:-)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 22:17:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean?  What is the
effect of the effluent on the immediate area around the
outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS.Â
TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a
fuck if there's a solution or not, technology is the second
most evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human
beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow
and not plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path
to your door.   Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through
a volcano.   Note, there are several to the west of
California at about six ??? hours flying time.  Some people
call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
Lynn
BTW, Texas has plenty of surface water that will meet our needs.
  The problem is that it comes rapidly over a short period of
time so we are building more and more water retention lakes for
long term water needs.
California has plenty of water, too, if you get rid of the various
environmental uses and force farmers to stop wasting it in the most
inefficient way to irrigate known to man.
And on the most water intensive luxury food crops.
You can have all of those nasty almonds. Especially since I am allergic
to almonds.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 19:36:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On 11/5/2018 3:54 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean?  What is the
effect of the effluent on the immediate area around the
outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt.  It might be 60,000 TDS. 
TDS = total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck
if there's a solution or not, technology is the second most
evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human beings
(except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and
not plug the pipe, patent it.  People will beat a path to
your door.   Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through
a volcano.   Note, there are several to the west of
California at about six ??? hours flying time.  Some people
call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
I assure you, son, Californians celebrate that fact at least as
much as you do. Perhaps even more.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 22:20:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*,
and the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean.
(But then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that
involves not destroying the quality of life for humans.
Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take for
a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach equilibrium
with the rest of the ocean? What is the effect of the effluent
on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS =
total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the outflow
pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you masturbate over
it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but a) they cost money,
and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck if there's a solution or
not, technology is the second most evil thing that has ever
existed, right behind human beings (except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and not
plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to your door.
Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it does
involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give people with a
normal IQ pause before pumping it into the ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
Note, there are several to the west of California at about six ???
hours flying time. Some people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
I don't live in California, thank goodness.
I'm sure we can find a way to make it Texas' fault.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 19:36:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On 11/5/2018 3:54 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because
it produces large amounts of brine that has to go
*somewhere*, and the greens are opposed to it going back
into the ocean. (But then, in CA, the greens are opposed
to anything that involves not destroying the quality of
life for humans. Except themselves.)
So they would have a problem with the salt content of the
ocean water rising from 30,000 TDS to 30,000.00001 TDS ?
You're supposed to be the smart guy, how long does it take
for a 50% brine being continuously emitted to reach
equilibrium with the rest of the ocean? What is the effect
of the effluent on the immediate area around the outflow?
When in doubt, dilute it some more.
And the outlet is not 50% salt. It might be 60,000 TDS. TDS
= total dissolved solids and is parts per million.
It's still enough to cause localized effects around the
outflow pipe. It _is_ an issue, no matter how furiously you
masturbate over it. There *are* ways to dealing with it, but
a) they cost money, and b) in California, noboby gives a fuck
if there's a solution or not, technology is the second most
evil thing that has ever existed, right behind human beings
(except themselves, of course).
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you can get a liquid mixture that is 50% salt to flow and
not plug the pipe, patent it. People will beat a path to
your door.
Otherwise, take a hike.
That's trivial, and has been done many times. Of course, it
does involve 1,500° F temperatures, which would even give
people with a normal IQ pause before pumping it into the
ocean.
If that is the solution then just run the outlet pipe through a volcano.
Note, there are several to the west of California at about
six ???
hours flying time. Some people call them Hawaii.
You willing to pay for the pipeline from California to Hawaii?
Imagine the union jobs to build that!
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-06 02:32:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konko
ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure
needs. The protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor
attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now
you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have
always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago,
over Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting
war with Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind
you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build
an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and the
greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But then, in
CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves not destroying
the quality of life for humans. Except themselves.)
Hm. I suspect there are engineering solutions for that. I am
not an engineer, but Hal is. I suggested a long tube with small
holes in it, that will slowly leak small amounts of brine back
into the sea, with no excessive concentration anywhere. (I think
I was thinking of the time I was NPO for a month and had a PICC
lane that dumped fluid and nutrients into a very large artery,
just before in reached the heart.)

And the engineer said, "Either that, or build salt pans and
evaporate the salt and sell it."

Considering that large shallow parts of the Bay used to be Leslie
Salt evaporation pons, and they're now being returned back to
wetlands and wildlife, but there's still a market for salt ....
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 03:31:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Kon
ko ly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem.
That's not gonna happen either, they've been trying
for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some formula
like "one member from each county". This had the effect it
has in the US Senate where populous states can't run
completely roughshod over the interests of rural states.
1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely
IMHO, and now you have situations like California and
Upstate New York where the population has no way to have
their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
Could be, but desal has issues in and of itself, because it
produces large amounts of brine that has to go *somewhere*, and
the greens are opposed to it going back into the ocean. (But
then, in CA, the greens are opposed to anything that involves
not destroying the quality of life for humans. Except
themselves.)
Hm. I suspect there are engineering solutions for that.
There are. But they make what is already the most expensive way to
produce drinking water in industrial quantities even *more*
espensive.

Plus, the enviro-whackos don't care.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-05 23:20:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by
Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/
dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies and
not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the
fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California and
rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own State
and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's not
gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long time,
but they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was
more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a
days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in Sacramento
and Salem ignoring their region's infrastructure needs. The
protests were cut short by the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration, along
with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in the
US Senate where populous states can't run completely roughshod
over the interests of rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims"
put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations
like California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to bend
Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a pretty
extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily turn
into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California have always
been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many years ago, over
Colorado River water would have turned into a shooting war with
Arizona - they were both states at that point, mind you - if the
feds hadn't intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California build an
enormous nuclear power complex for sea water desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to supply
California with water. The area required would be the size of Los
Angeles. And it would have to start up each day and shut down each day.
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel. And since corrosion is directly related to startup
cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome. Just ask the Navy,
they have a little experience in this.

One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.

Or an iceberg towed from a pole.

Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear power
plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million people. The power
would be steam, not electrical energy. Much more efficient.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 22:47:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Kon
koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make
it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and
now you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California
have always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many
years ago, over Colorado River water would have turned into a
shooting war with Arizona - they were both states at that
point, mind you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops
of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to supply
California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give billions
of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los Angeles.
And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are solar stations
there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all those
problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure will
almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the unions have
milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get, it will just
quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome. Just
ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment? How does
that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough desert space
to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever actually
done that), since parking an iceberg in a large ocean bay would
affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million people.
The power would be steam, not electrical energy. Much more
efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and drinking
their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they resort to Evil.
Nuclear. Anything.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 00:03:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Kon
koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning.
Maybe it just about politics and dystopian societies
and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern California
and rural Southern Oregon. They want to be their own
State and not be ruled by Sacramento and Salem. That's
not gonna happen either, they've been trying for a long
time, but they just don't have the population to make
it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by the
Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states had
representation in the State Senate done by some formula like
"one member from each county". This had the effect it has in
the US Senate where populous states can't run completely
roughshod over the interests of rural states. 1964's
"Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this, unwisely IMHO, and
now you have situations like California and Upstate New York
where the population has no way to have their concerns
addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes a
pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could easily
turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in California
have always been a pretty major issue. One dispute, many
years ago, over Colorado River water would have turned into a
shooting war with Arizona - they were both states at that
point, mind you - if the feds hadn't intervened with troops
of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to supply
California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give billions
of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los Angeles.
And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are solar stations
there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all those
problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure will
almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the unions have
milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get, it will just
quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome. Just
ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment? How does
that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough desert space
to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever actually
done that), since parking an iceberg in a large ocean bay would
affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million people.
The power would be steam, not electrical energy. Much more
efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and drinking
their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they resort to Evil.
Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be freaking
awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water. That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.

If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match the solar
power availability, the salt water will corrode the heck out of them as
the thermal metal growth pops the scale off and presents fresh metal
(and fresh cracks) to the salt water. More scale forms and then pops
off into the sump of the distiller.

Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert ? And
then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ? But then you
can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-05 23:52:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-
Kon koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern
California and rural Southern Oregon. They want to
be their own State and not be ruled by Sacramento and
Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've been
trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states can't
run completely roughshod over the interests of rural
states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this,
unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like California
and Upstate New York where the population has no way to
have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to
supply California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give
billions of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los
Angeles. And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are
solar stations there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all
those problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure will
almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the unions
have milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get, it will
just quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome.
Just ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment? How
does that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough
desert space to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever
actually done that), since parking an iceberg in a large ocean
bay would affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million
people. The power would be steam, not electrical energy. Much
more efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and drinking
their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they resort to
Evil. Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ?
Depends on what you mean by "electric." Mostly, it's R/O. Which,
yes, uses a *lot* of electricity.
Post by Lynn McGuire
That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
Which is why it will never, ever happen.
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match
the solar power availability,
Magic batteries, remember, so no start and stop.
Post by Lynn McGuire
the salt water will corrode the
heck out of them as the thermal metal growth pops the scale off
and presents fresh metal (and fresh cracks) to the salt water.
More scale forms and then pops off into the sump of the
distiller.
Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert ?
And then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ?
But then you can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html
You seemed to have missed the real plan, here, which is that no
actual desalinization will ever take place. Billions will be spent
on union jobs, using materials bought from industries that
contribute heavily to reelection funds, and it's entirely possible
that *no* actual work will *ever* take place before it's cancelled.

Privately fundned industry plants are so difficult to build
(deliberately, to drive the price up beyond rationality, because
that *works* to achieve the green agenda of keeping California a
festering shithole for business) that they will never happen on any
meaningful scale.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 02:21:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-
Kon koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern
California and rural Southern Oregon. They want to
be their own State and not be ruled by Sacramento and
Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've been
trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states can't
run completely roughshod over the interests of rural
states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this,
unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like California
and Upstate New York where the population has no way to
have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to
supply California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give
billions of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los
Angeles. And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are
solar stations there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all
those problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure will
almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the unions
have milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get, it will
just quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome.
Just ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment? How
does that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough
desert space to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever
actually done that), since parking an iceberg in a large ocean
bay would affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million
people. The power would be steam, not electrical energy. Much
more efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and drinking
their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they resort to
Evil. Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ?
Depends on what you mean by "electric." Mostly, it's R/O. Which,
yes, uses a *lot* of electricity.
Post by Lynn McGuire
That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
Which is why it will never, ever happen.
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match
the solar power availability,
Magic batteries, remember, so no start and stop.
Post by Lynn McGuire
the salt water will corrode the
heck out of them as the thermal metal growth pops the scale off
and presents fresh metal (and fresh cracks) to the salt water.
More scale forms and then pops off into the sump of the
distiller.
Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert ?
And then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ?
But then you can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html
You seemed to have missed the real plan, here, which is that no
actual desalinization will ever take place. Billions will be spent
on union jobs, using materials bought from industries that
contribute heavily to reelection funds, and it's entirely possible
that *no* actual work will *ever* take place before it's cancelled.
Privately fundned industry plants are so difficult to build
(deliberately, to drive the price up beyond rationality, because
that *works* to achieve the green agenda of keeping California a
festering shithole for business) that they will never happen on any
meaningful scale.
Hey, I did not know that you could use r/o for desalination. Neat !
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_osmosis#Desalination

Yuck, seawater r/o desalination requires 800 to to 1,180 psia. That is
a big pump. And a lot of pretreatment (expensive !). 50% rejection
rate, not bad. And keeps the TDS on the reject water at 70,000.

The r/o systems I used to work with used brackish water in west Texas.
We ran them at around 400 psia. Freaking high maintenance, lots of
leaks but that was back in the 1980s.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 03:36:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
om
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Stev
en- Kon koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like,
in the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna
happen. Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest
of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon.
They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that
it was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states
can't run completely roughshod over the interests of
rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to
this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like
California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state
capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to
supply California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give
billions of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los
Angeles. And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are
solar stations there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all
those problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along
with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure
will almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the
unions have milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get,
it will just quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome.
Just ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment?
How does that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough
desert space to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever
actually done that), since parking an iceberg in a large
ocean bay would affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million
people. The power would be steam, not electrical energy.
Much more efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and
drinking their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they
resort to Evil. Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ?
Depends on what you mean by "electric." Mostly, it's R/O.
Which, yes, uses a *lot* of electricity.
Post by Lynn McGuire
That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
Which is why it will never, ever happen.
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match
the solar power availability,
Magic batteries, remember, so no start and stop.
Post by Lynn McGuire
the salt water will corrode the
heck out of them as the thermal metal growth pops the scale
off and presents fresh metal (and fresh cracks) to the salt
water. More scale forms and then pops off into the sump of the
distiller.
Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert
? And then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ?
But then you can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html
You seemed to have missed the real plan, here, which is that no
actual desalinization will ever take place. Billions will be
spent on union jobs, using materials bought from industries
that contribute heavily to reelection funds, and it's entirely
possible that *no* actual work will *ever* take place before
it's cancelled.
Privately fundned industry plants are so difficult to build
(deliberately, to drive the price up beyond rationality,
because that *works* to achieve the green agenda of keeping
California a festering shithole for business) that they will
never happen on any meaningful scale.
Hey, I did not know that you could use r/o for desalination.
Neat !
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_osmosis#Desalination
There are a lot of things you don't know. Mostly, they seem to be
things you believe you know.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Yuck, seawater r/o desalination requires 800 to to 1,180 psia.
That is a big pump. And a lot of pretreatment (expensive !).
50% rejection rate, not bad. And keeps the TDS on the reject
water at 70,000.
The r/o systems I used to work with used brackish water in west
Texas. We ran them at around 400 psia. Freaking high
maintenance, lots of leaks but that was back in the 1980s.
As astounding as it might seem, believe it or not, the technology
has improved in the last 40 years.

But that doesn't matter. The greenies don't give a shit if there
are solutions. They just want to drive all the undeserving proles
(of which, of course, they are *not* members) out of California
(and preferably out of the world of the living, in many cases). And
are often financed by billionaires who are either as fucking crazy
as their followers and believe what they're shoveling, or have a
carefully formulated plan to arrange for California to so expensive
to live in that only rich people and their slaves are allowed.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 05:15:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-
Kon koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in
the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.
Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson,"
adhered to by some people in rural Northern
California and rural Southern Oregon. They want to
be their own State and not be ruled by Sacramento and
Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've been
trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it
was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick
now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against immigration,
along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states can't
run completely roughshod over the interests of rural
states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to this,
unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like California
and Upstate New York where the population has no way to
have their concerns addressed in the state capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known to
bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass. Takes
a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to
supply California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give
billions of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los
Angeles. And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are
solar stations there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all
those problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure will
almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the unions
have milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get, it will
just quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome.
Just ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment? How
does that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough
desert space to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever
actually done that), since parking an iceberg in a large ocean
bay would affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million
people. The power would be steam, not electrical energy. Much
more efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and drinking
their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they resort to
Evil. Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ?
Depends on what you mean by "electric." Mostly, it's R/O. Which,
yes, uses a *lot* of electricity.
Post by Lynn McGuire
That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
Which is why it will never, ever happen.
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match
the solar power availability,
Magic batteries, remember, so no start and stop.
Post by Lynn McGuire
the salt water will corrode the
heck out of them as the thermal metal growth pops the scale off
and presents fresh metal (and fresh cracks) to the salt water.
More scale forms and then pops off into the sump of the
distiller.
Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert ?
And then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ?
But then you can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html
You seemed to have missed the real plan, here, which is that no
actual desalinization will ever take place. Billions will be spent
on union jobs, using materials bought from industries that
contribute heavily to reelection funds, and it's entirely possible
that *no* actual work will *ever* take place before it's cancelled.
Privately fundned industry plants are so difficult to build
(deliberately, to drive the price up beyond rationality, because
that *works* to achieve the green agenda of keeping California a
festering shithole for business) that they will never happen on any
meaningful scale.
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for business", is it?

:-)
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-06 06:23:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
om
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30:03 PM UTC-4,
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_
by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Stev
en- Kon koly/ dp /1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is
waning. Maybe it just about politics and dystopian
societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like,
in the fifties, when it was a new and frightening
concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna
happen. Rather, Caifornia will assimilate the rest
of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of
Jefferson," adhered to by some people in rural
Northern California and rural Southern Oregon.
They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen
either, they've been trying for a long time, but
they just don't have the population to make it
happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that
it was more of a Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing
schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to
succeed, they're doing no harm.
It was a complaint against the state governments in
Sacramento and Salem ignoring their region's
infrastructure needs. The protests were cut short by
the Pearl Harbor attack.
Nowadays, it seems to be a backlash against
immigration, along with rural concerns.
And water rights. And distribution of tax revenues.
Don't know about California, but at one time many states
had representation in the State Senate done by some
formula like "one member from each county". This had the
effect it has in the US Senate where populous states
can't run completely roughshod over the interests of
rural states. 1964's "Reynolds v. Sims" put a stop to
this, unwisely IMHO, and now you have situations like
California and Upstate New York where the population has
no way to have their concerns addressed in the state
capital.
California has an initiative process that has been known
to bend Sacramento over a barrel and fuck it in the ass.
Takes a pretty extreme situation, but it's there.
A lack of sufficient water for the LA metro area could
easily turn into that sort of thing. (Water rights in
California have always been a pretty major issue. One
dispute, many years ago, over Colorado River water would
have turned into a shooting war with Arizona - they were
both states at that point, mind you - if the feds hadn't
intervened with troops of their own.)
The book did have an interesting turn as it had California
build an enormous nuclear power complex for sea water
desalinization.
At this stage, much more likely solar.
There is not enough area for solar power desalination to
supply California with water.
Not relevant to whether or not the legislature will give
billions of dollars to the unions to build one.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The area required would be the size of
Los Angeles.
The Mojave Desert is roughtly 100 times as large as Los
Angeles. And is sunny pretty much all the time. (There are
solar stations there now.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
And it would have to start up each day and shut
down each day.
Ah, but Musk's battery walls are magical, and will solve all
those problems.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The stress on the equipment would be incredible along
with the number
of personnel.
Also irrelevant, since that sort of public infrastructure
will almost certianly never be completed anyway. Once the
unions have milked the taxpayers for as much as they can get,
it will just quietly go away.
Post by Lynn McGuire
And since corrosion is directly related to
startup cycles, the maintenance required would be awesome.
Just ask the Navy, they have a little experience in this.
Corrosion is related to startup cycles on solar equipment?
How does that work? (And remember, we really *do* have enough
desert space to guarantee it would be *very* dry.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
One could use natural gas. A lot of natural gas.
Not so much in California.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Or an iceberg towed from a pole.
Definitely not in California (aside from "no one has ever
actually done that), since parking an iceberg in a large
ocean bay would affect ocean termperatures, and thus be evil.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Nope, nuclear would be best. Probably take 10 to 20 nuclear
power plants to supply desalinated water for 40 million
people. The power would be steam, not electrical energy.
Much more efficient.
As I said, Californians will resort to cannibalism and
drinking their illegal immigrant servant's blood before they
resort to Evil. Nuclear. Anything.
Are you going to use electric desalination ?
Depends on what you mean by "electric." Mostly, it's R/O.
Which, yes, uses a *lot* of electricity.
Post by Lynn McGuire
That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
Which is why it will never, ever happen.
Post by Lynn McGuire
If you start and stop the electric desalinators daily to match
the solar power availability,
Magic batteries, remember, so no start and stop.
Post by Lynn McGuire
the salt water will corrode the
heck out of them as the thermal metal growth pops the scale
off and presents fresh metal (and fresh cracks) to the salt
water. More scale forms and then pops off into the sump of the
distiller.
Or are you going to pump the ocean water to the mojave desert
? And then pump double salted reject water back to the ocean ?
But then you can use real solar desalination.
https://water.usgs.gov/edu/drinkseawater.html
You seemed to have missed the real plan, here, which is that no
actual desalinization will ever take place. Billions will be
spent on union jobs, using materials bought from industries
that contribute heavily to reelection funds, and it's entirely
possible that *no* actual work will *ever* take place before
it's cancelled.
Privately fundned industry plants are so difficult to build
(deliberately, to drive the price up beyond rationality,
because that *works* to achieve the green agenda of keeping
California a festering shithole for business) that they will
never happen on any meaningful scale.
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 17:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 17:01:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
Pretending you're kidding makes you look retarded.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
John Halpenny
2018-11-06 15:20:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 12:16:03 AM UTC-5, Alan Baker wrote:
<snip>
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for business", is it?
:-)
That's how you get large economies - by screwing everyone around you.

John
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 15:41:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Halpenny
On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 12:16:03 AM UTC-5, Alan Baker
wrote: <snip>
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
That's how you get large economies - by screwing everyone around you.
And in survey after survey after survey, only New York beats
California as the most hostile place to run a business in the US. And
not by much.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 17:35:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by John Halpenny
On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 12:16:03 AM UTC-5, Alan Baker
wrote: <snip>
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
That's how you get large economies - by screwing everyone around you.
And in survey after survey after survey, only New York beats
California as the most hostile place to run a business in the US. And
not by much.
Not that you'll ever produce any support for that claim...
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 17:02:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by John Halpenny
On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 12:16:03 AM UTC-5, Alan Baker
wrote: <snip>
Post by Alan Baker
The fifth largest economy in the world is a "shithole for
business", is it?
:-)
That's how you get large economies - by screwing everyone
around you.
And in survey after survey after survey, only New York beats
California as the most hostile place to run a business in the
US. And not by much.
Not that you'll ever produce any support for that claim...
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Scott Lurndal
2018-11-06 14:08:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Lynn McGuire <***@gmail.com> writes:

[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be freaking
awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water. That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.

And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the entire
state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 15:43:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
Sometimes. But not always, even by those who live here. The "People's
Republic" meme (as an allusion to communism) is strong here.
Post by Scott Lurndal
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the
entire state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
For many reaons, the most important being that it's political
impossible to even try.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Scott Lurndal
2018-11-06 18:01:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
Sometimes. But not always, even by those who live here. The "People's
Republic" meme (as an allusion to communism) is strong here.
I've lived in the state for almost four decades, and I've
never heard "the peoples republic" used by anyone other than
a handful of right-wing nutcases. Granted, I never lived
in Orange County but it is a small and generally politically
insignificant portion of the state.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the
entire state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
For many reaons, the most important being that it's political
impossible to even try.
It's physically impossible and completely unnecessary.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 17:07:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
Sometimes. But not always, even by those who live here. The
"People's Republic" meme (as an allusion to communism) is strong
here.
I've lived in the state for almost four decades,
So have I.
Post by Scott Lurndal
and I've
never heard "the peoples republic" used by anyone other than
a handful of right-wing nutcases.
With "right-wing nutcases" defined as "people I disagree with,"
which is to say, nearly everybody. Standard leftie newspeak.
Post by Scott Lurndal
Granted, I never lived
in Orange County
Where I hear it a lot.
Post by Scott Lurndal
but it is a small and generally politically
insignificant portion of the state.
Given the amount of money here, and the number of celebrities who
live in Newport Beach because anywhere near Hollywood is too full
of moonbats, I find that statement to be hysterically funny.
Granted, the true rich are quieter about their influence, but only
a moron who has no clue what they're jibbering about (the typical
moonbat sheeple, like you) could possbily believe that.
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the
entire state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
For many reaons, the most important being that it's political
impossible to even try.
It's physically impossible
You have such a limited imagination. It isn't very practical,
granted, but impossible? Heh.
Post by Scott Lurndal
and completely unnecessary.
A great deal of what politics causes regarding water in California
is unneccesary in any practical sense, but dammit! those union
execs have payments to make on their third yacht!
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 19:48:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be
freaking awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water.
That could double the electrical load of the state of
Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
Sometimes. But not always, even by those who live here. The
"People's Republic" meme (as an allusion to communism) is strong
here.
I've lived in the state for almost four decades,
So have I.
Five plus decades here, including an introduction to local politics as a
child because my mother worked at the local League of Women Voters, so I
got drafted into doing odd jobs.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 20:06:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
[snip effluent]
Post by Lynn McGuire
Are you going to use electric desalination ? That would be freaking
awesome. 40 million people use a lot of fresh water. That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the entire
state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40 million ?
When these caravans starting running 10,000 people per day into
California and Texas, the population will zoom.

Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure for the
bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought dries up the
snow melt lakes in the Sierras.

Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about Kalifornia.

Lynn
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 20:17:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
  [snip effluent]
Are you going to use electric desalination ?  That would be freaking
awesome.  40 million people use a lot of fresh water.  That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the entire
state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40 million ?
When these caravans starting running 10,000 people per day into
California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these caravans",
but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure for the
bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought dries up the
snow melt lakes in the Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about Kalifornia.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 19:39:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
  [snip effluent]
Are you going to use electric desalination ?  That would be
freaking awesome.  40 million people use a lot of fresh
water.  That could double the electrical load of the state
of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the
entire state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40
million ? When these caravans starting running 10,000 people
per day into California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these
caravans", but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure
for the bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought
dries up the snow melt lakes in the Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about
Kalifornia.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 22:01:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
How is a reply to Lynn anything to do with you?
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40
million ? When these caravans starting running 10,000 people
per day into California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these
caravans", but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure
for the bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought
dries up the snow melt lakes in the Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about
Kalifornia.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 21:22:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
How is a reply to Lynn anything to do with you?
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40
million ? When these caravans starting running 10,000 people
per day into California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these
caravans", but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public
infrastructure for the bad days when the Colorado river goes
dry and a drought dries up the snow melt lakes in the
Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about
Kalifornia.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 21:01:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
  [snip effluent]
Are you going to use electric desalination ?  That would be freaking
awesome.  40 million people use a lot of fresh water.  That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the entire
state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40 million ?
When these caravans starting running 10,000 people per day into
California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these caravans",
but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure for the
bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought dries up the
snow melt lakes in the Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about Kalifornia.
"A second migrant caravan of 2,000 is moving through southern Mexico"

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/11/01/central-america-migrant-caravan-reaches-southern-mexico-guatemala-border/1842490002/

Lynn
Alan Baker
2018-11-06 22:02:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
  [snip effluent]
Are you going to use electric desalination ?  That would be freaking
awesome.  40 million people use a lot of fresh water.  That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the entire
state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40 million ?
When these caravans starting running 10,000 people per day into
California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these
caravans", but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public infrastructure for
the bad days when the Colorado river goes dry and a drought dries up
the snow melt lakes in the Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about Kalifornia.
"A second migrant caravan of 2,000 is moving through southern Mexico"
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/11/01/central-america-migrant-caravan-reaches-southern-mexico-guatemala-border/1842490002/
Lynn
OK.

And that translates into "10,000 per DAY"... ...how?
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-06 21:25:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The lies (and sexual obsession with me) continue.
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Lynn McGuire
  [snip effluent]
Are you going to use electric desalination ?  That would
be freaking awesome.  40 million people use a lot of fresh
water.  That could double
the electrical load of the state of Kalifornia.
It's spelled California, asshole.
And again, nobody is proposing to desalinate water for the
entire state poplulation, that would be simply stupid.
Who says the the state population is going to remain at 40
million ? When these caravans starting running 10,000 people
per day into California and Texas, the population will zoom.
I wish I could say that I believe you're joking about "these
caravans", but you're clearly not.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Plus anyone with a lick of sense designs public
infrastructure for the bad days when the Colorado river goes
dry and a drought dries up the snow melt lakes in the
Sierras.
Oh wait, I keep on forgetting that we are talking about
Kalifornia.
"A second migrant caravan of 2,000 is moving through southern
Mexico"
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/11/01/centra
l-america-migrant-caravan-reaches-southern-mexico-guatemala-bord
er/1842490002/
Lynn
OK.
And that translates into "10,000 per DAY"... ...how?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-02 23:40:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Uh oh, I bounced off this book. _Fractured State_ by Steven Konkoly
https://www.amazon.com/Fractured-State-Steven-Konkoly/dp/1503935582/
Maybe my taste for post apocalyptic novels is waning. Maybe it just
about politics and dystopian societies and not interesting.
I lost my taste for that genre long ago ... like, in the fifties,
when it was a new and frightening concept.
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
(Now, there is the hypothetical "State of Jefferson," adhered to
by some people in rural Northern California and rural Southern
Oregon. They want to be their own State and not be ruled by
Sacramento and Salem. That's not gonna happen either, they've
been trying for a long time, but they just don't have the
population to make it happen.)
I think they know that. I got the impression that it was more of a
Chamber of Commerce PR/Marketing schtick now a days.
Possibly. In any case, since they're not going to succeed,
they're doing no harm.
Hmm, Ten Deadly Words? In a different way from the Eight.
nuny@bid.nes
2018-11-04 04:40:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?

That California?

I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.


Mark L. Fergerson
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-04 06:53:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-11-04 14:04:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.  Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
   California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large
cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the
state with the most businesses fleeing?
   That California?
   I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet
Fifth, as of 2018.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-04 17:21:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen.  Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
   California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large
cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the
state with the most businesses fleeing?
   That California?
   I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet
    Fifth, as of 2018.
Thank you.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-04 15:14:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.

Nuny's data seems to be a bit stale; eight years ago, when Brown
took office, California did have a 27-billion-dollar deficit; now,
as he prepares to retire, we have a 9-billion surplus. Which we
need to use cautiously, against the next recession.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-04 17:23:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.
Thanks.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-04 20:51:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.
Thanks.
Take note: in California, you see your future.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-04 23:29:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.
Thanks.
Take note: in California, you see your future.
Just as long as they get rid of the "All Vegetable Bacon Bits".

*waves hi from across the bay*
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-05 01:45:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.
Thanks.
Take note: in California, you see your future.
Just as long as they get rid of the "All Vegetable Bacon Bits".
There was an article on _Slate_ a couple days ago on how to make
kids like vegetables by sprinkling them with some spice that
"made them taste like bacon." I'll have to look that up; I have
a grandson who wants to eat nothing but starch, chicken nuggets,
and Halloween candy.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*waves hi from across the bay*
Hi! What side of the bay are you on? I'm in Vallejo, which is
designated North Bay. We hope to move back to the East Bay next
year, at a minimum south of the Carquinez Bridge so the middle
generation's commute won't cost so many bridge fares.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-05 04:37:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the
highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities
with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with
the most businesses fleeing?
Post by ***@bid.nes
That California?
I didn't realize you were that much into alt-history SF.
The California that as an independent country would have the eighth
largest economy on the planet and the California that would drop the US
from first to third by leaving.
Um, fifth largest, last I read.
Thanks.
Take note: in California, you see your future.
Just as long as they get rid of the "All Vegetable Bacon Bits".
There was an article on _Slate_ a couple days ago on how to make
kids like vegetables by sprinkling them with some spice that
"made them taste like bacon." I'll have to look that up; I have
a grandson who wants to eat nothing but starch, chicken nuggets,
and Halloween candy.
No, don't. I asked the store owner about them. They are NOT bacon
flavored vegetable bits. He was very insistent that they were BACON
bits made from vegetables.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*waves hi from across the bay*
Hi! What side of the bay are you on? I'm in Vallejo, which is
designated North Bay. We hope to move back to the East Bay next
year, at a minimum south of the Carquinez Bridge so the middle
generation's commute won't cost so many bridge fares.
Marin county. Home of the Bay Area crazies that got rich going
professional.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-11-04 14:04:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
The California whose economy contributes vastly more to the US than it
takes from the Federal government? The California that is the
fifth-largest economy in the world? Yes, that California. One of the
biggest states and the #1 ranked in terms of how much it gives rather
than receives (the #2 and #3 are Texas and New York).
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
h***@gmail.com
2018-11-04 14:27:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
you might want to actually investigate issues rather than listening to right wing propaganda.
David Johnston
2018-11-04 14:39:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
The state with the highest poverty rate is Mississippi. California appears nowhere on the top 10 highest poverty rate states. The state with the highest homelessness rate is Hawaii, although that's not a bad state to be homeless in. I'd certainly preferit to the silver medal winner, New York
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-05 00:56:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
The state with the highest poverty rate is Mississippi. California appears nowhere on the top 10 highest poverty rate states. The state with the highest homelessness rate is Hawaii, although that's not a bad state to be homeless in. I'd certainly preferit to the silver medal winner, New York
The last that I heard, Hawaii was a net importer of homeless people
who presumably reason the same way as you.
J. Clarke
2018-11-05 02:10:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 16:56:55 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
The state with the highest poverty rate is Mississippi. California appears nowhere on the top 10 highest poverty rate states. The state with the highest homelessness rate is Hawaii, although that's not a bad state to be homeless in. I'd certainly preferit to the silver medal winner, New York
The last that I heard, Hawaii was a net importer of homeless people
who presumably reason the same way as you.
Not really--most of them come from places that are just as comfortable
as Hawaii, just smaller and with less opportunity.
Titus G
2018-11-05 03:36:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And as for California seceding ... not gonna happen. Rather,
Caifornia will assimilate the rest of the US.
California, the state with the biggest deficit, the state with the highest poverty and homeless rates, the state with the most large cities with streets full of human feces and used drug needles, the state with the most businesses fleeing?
The state with the highest poverty rate is Mississippi. California appears nowhere on the top 10 highest poverty rate states. The state with the highest homelessness rate is Hawaii, although that's not a bad state to be homeless in. I'd certainly preferit to the silver medal winner, New York
The last that I heard, Hawaii was a net importer of homeless people
Like Florida but not those states bordering Mexico?
Post by Robert Carnegie
who presumably reason the same way as you.
The homeless New Yorkers saving up for a one way ticket to Hawaii?
Or those planning to go to Hawaii to succeed on the silver screen to
avoid the smog in the Mulholland Drive bedroom?
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