Discussion:
What I read in 2019
(too old to reply)
David Goldfarb
2020-01-01 08:56:57 UTC
Permalink
So here's what I read in 2019. In addition to this, there were
subscriptions to Asimov's, Uncanny, the Bridge World, and the
American Contract Bridge League Bulletin. Also I don't list
comics / graphic novels.

January
The Voyage of the Basilisk, Marie Brennan
In an Absent Dream, Seanan McGuire
Pocket Apocalypse, Seanan McGuire

I had the "InCryptid" series from when it was nominated for the
Best Series Hugo. (The Brennans likewise.) There are two more in
my stack but honestly I kind of lost interest with this one.

Dragon Pearl, Yoon Ha Lee

February
Knife Children, Lois McMaster Bujold
The Comics Experience Guide to Writing Comics, Andy Schmidt
The Oracle Year, Charles Soule

Bought this one because I liked the author's comics work.
"Use the butterfly effect to do amazing things" is a favorite trope
of mine, and this one was clever; but I felt it didn't stick the landing.

The Seventh Bride, "T. Kingfisher"
The Test, Sylvain Neuvel
In the Labyrinth of Drakes, Marie Brennan

March
The Raven Tower, Ann Leckie
How Long 'Til Black Future Month? N. K. Jemisin
Within the Sanctuary of Wings, Marie Brennan
Under the Table: The Case Against the Blue Team, Avon Wilsmore

April
Alternate Routes, Tim Powers
The Great Divorce, C. S. Lewis
The Abbot, the Parrot, and the Bermuda Bowl, David Bird
The Eye of Strife, Dave Duncan
Portal of a Thousand Worlds, Dave Duncan

I went looking for Dave Duncans a while back and found several, but
they were languishing on Mt. Tsundoku. The author's death prompted me
to get to them. These two, as with most of his output, are good solid
entertaining reads but not good enough to put him in my A-list.

The Dreaming Stars, Tim Pratt

May
Then, Rob Hansen
The Levin-Gad, Diane Duane
Trail of Lightning, Rebecca Roanhorse
Binti: the Night Masquerade, Nnedi Okorafor
Good Omens, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
By Demons Possessed, P. C. Hodgell
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Kelly Robson

June
Lent, Jo Walton
The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal
The Tea Master and the Detective, Aliette de Bodard
The Black God's Drums, P. Djeli Clark
Astounding, Alec Nevala-Lee
A Civil Contract, Georgette Heydt

A break from Hugo reading. I picked up a couple of Heyer's books when
they were on sale. I don't remember what prompted me to read that one
right then.

July
Middlegame, Seanan McGuire

While I'd lost interest in reading the other series, this novel by
contrast knocked my socks off and will certainly have a spot on my
Hugo nominating ballot next year.

The Best There is at What He Does: Examining Chris Claremont's X-Men,
Jason Powell
Empress of Forever, Max Gladstone
The Orphans of Raspay, Lois McMaster Bujold

August
This is How You Lose the Time War, Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone
Minor Mage, "T. Kingfisher"
The Landlady, Diane Duane
Alien: Echo, "Mira Grant"
Pillar of Darkness, Dave Duncan
Kingfisher, Patricia McKillip
Ironfoot, Dave Duncan
Trial by Treason, Dave Duncan
The Consuming Fire, John Scalzi

September
The Language of Bridge, Kit Woolsey
In Calabria, Peter S. Beagle
The Unkindest Tide, Seanan McGuire
All Those Explosions Were Someone Else's Fault, James Alan Gardner
Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process, John McPhee
The Ten Thousand Doors of January, Alix E. Harrow
To Be Taught, If Fortunate, Becky Chambers
Irona 700, Dave Duncan

This one made me sad that the author is gone, because there is a
massive editing fail in it, and I would really like to have been
able to contact him about it. The main character gets a message from
the ghost of her lover, and she knows it's him because he uses a
nickname that nobody else knew about: "Queenie". But when they were
alive and together we the readers _never once_ heard him use it.

October
Exhalation, Ted Chiang
The Twisted Ones, "T. Kingfisher"
They Promised Me the Gun Wasn't Loaded, James Alan Gardner
Legend, Ryk E. Spoor
Demons of the Past: Revelation, Ryk E. Spoor
Demons of the Past: Revolution, Ryk E. Spoor
Bridge Philosopher 4, James Kauder
Demons of the Past: Retribution, Ryk E. Spoor

November
Nirvana Express, S. P. Somtow
The Forbidden Stars, Tim Pratt
Skyward, Brandon Sanderson
The Lights Go Out in Lychford, Paul Cornell
More Walls Broken, Tim Powers
Hexarchate Stories, Yoon Ha Lee
Catfishing on CatNet, Naomi Kritzer
Starsight, Brandon Sanderson

December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
Circe, Madeline Miller
The Iron Dragon's Daughter, Michael Swanwick
The Iron Dragon's Mother, Michael Swanwick
The Fated Sky, Mary Robinette Kowal
One Velvet Glove, Dave Duncan
The Island of Evil Chair, Jenna Katerin Moran

77 total, a noticeable uptick from last year. 66 SF or fantasy,
10 non-fiction, 1 literary fiction (or whatever genre you want
to put a Regency romance in). 32.5 by women, 44.5 by men.

In the coming year I may try to post my reading monthly instead
of in one lump at the end of the year.
--
David Goldfarb |"I came to Casablanca for the waters."
***@gmail.com | "The waters? What waters? We're in the desert."
***@ocf.berkeley.edu |"I was misinformed."
Robert Carnegie
2020-01-01 14:21:40 UTC
Permalink
"Georgette Heydt"? ;-)
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-01-01 18:04:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
So here's what I read in 2019. In addition to this, there were
77 total, a noticeable uptick from last year. 66 SF or fantasy,
10 non-fiction, 1 literary fiction (or whatever genre you want
to put a Regency romance in). 32.5 by women, 44.5 by men.
In the coming year I may try to post my reading monthly instead
of in one lump at the end of the year.
Interesting list, which does not overlap mine at all (Though I have read
_Good Omens_ some years ago).
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Titus G
2020-01-03 05:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by David Goldfarb
So here's what I read in 2019. In addition to this, there were
77 total, a noticeable uptick from last year. 66 SF or fantasy,
10 non-fiction, 1 literary fiction (or whatever genre you want
to put a Regency romance in). 32.5 by women, 44.5 by men.
In the coming year I may try to post my reading monthly instead
of in one lump at the end of the year.
Interesting list, which does not overlap mine at all (Though I have read
_Good Omens_ some years ago).
I reread that last year and really enjoyed it. I have only read four of
David's list.
Chris Buckley
2020-01-01 22:45:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
July
Middlegame, Seanan McGuire
While I'd lost interest in reading the other series, this novel by
contrast knocked my socks off and will certainly have a spot on my
Hugo nominating ballot next year.
Yes. I also have stopped buying the Incryptid series - just not
enough advancement of plot or theme in each book. But she can
be an excellent writer in general and _Middlegame_ is an excellent book;
definitely in the top 5 books I've read this past year.

Chris
Titus G
2020-01-03 05:26:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Buckley
Post by David Goldfarb
July
Middlegame, Seanan McGuire
While I'd lost interest in reading the other series, this novel by
contrast knocked my socks off and will certainly have a spot on my
Hugo nominating ballot next year.
Yes. I also have stopped buying the Incryptid series - just not
enough advancement of plot or theme in each book. But she can
be an excellent writer in general and _Middlegame_ is an excellent book;
definitely in the top 5 books I've read this past year.
Chris
I have had this since July last, probably because it was recommended
here and haven't opened it yet but will now have to bump it up the TBR
list. Thank you both.
David DeLaney
2020-01-03 08:25:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
Demons of the Past: Revolution, Ryk E. Spoor
Demons of the Past: Retribution, Ryk E. Spoor
These two are still not on the Kobo store, by the way, Ryk.

Your appreciation for some Dave Duncan leads me to believe you may enjoy
either his eight-book double series A Man Of His Word / A Handful of Men, if
you haven't already of course, and/or the trilogy/pentalogy(!)/trilogy of the
King's Blades.

Dave, and maybe others
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Robert Woodward
2020-01-03 18:25:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by David Goldfarb
Demons of the Past: Revolution, Ryk E. Spoor
Demons of the Past: Retribution, Ryk E. Spoor
These two are still not on the Kobo store, by the way, Ryk.
They are also not present on the Apple's bookstore either.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
David Goldfarb
2020-01-04 06:22:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Your appreciation for some Dave Duncan leads me to believe you may enjoy
either his eight-book double series A Man Of His Word / A Handful of Men, if
you haven't already of course, and/or the trilogy/pentalogy(!)/trilogy of the
King's Blades.
Oh yes, I read those long ago. _One Velvet Glove_ is a King's Blades
story, in fact. (I can still recall my feelings on coming to the
ending of _Lord of the Fire Lands_.)
--
David Goldfarb |From the fortune cookie file:
***@gmail.com |
***@ocf.berkeley.edu |"Sell your ideas -- they are totally acceptable."
D B Davis
2020-01-03 15:23:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
So here's what I read in 2019. In addition to this, there were
subscriptions to Asimov's, Uncanny, the Bridge World, and the
American Contract Bridge League Bulletin. Also I don't list
comics / graphic novels.
<snip>
Post by David Goldfarb
April
Alternate Routes, Tim Powers
The Great Divorce, C. S. Lewis
The Lewis is the only story on your list read by me. The notion of free
will throughout eternity, all the way down to the Ninth Circle of Hell,
(so to speak) and beyond, resonates with me. God gives you what you want,
so be careful what you wish for (to appropriate an aphorism).
Post by David Goldfarb
June
Lent, Jo Walton
The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal
The Tea Master and the Detective, Aliette de Bodard
The Black God's Drums, P. Djeli Clark
Astounding, Alec Nevala-Lee
The scandalous gossip in this one didn't quite suck me in. Nevala-Lee's
tongue-lashing tome's tone brings to mind Pukallus, Hahn, and Pukallus'
criticism of _Perry Rhodan_ [1].

Note.

[1] https://www.depauw.edu/sfs/backissues/18/pukallus18art.htm



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Joe Bernstein
2020-01-14 02:37:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
So here's what I read in 2019. In addition to this, there were
subscriptions to Asimov's, Uncanny, the Bridge World, and the
American Contract Bridge League Bulletin. Also I don't list
comics / graphic novels.
We overlap very little. I'm not sure how much of that is because you
list a bunch of short fiction. I'm not looking forward to being told
that no, these really are all novels, and I'm several times more
outdated than I thought I was. (Bujold has written two *novels* I
hadn't heard about? Oh, they're stand-alone novellas.)
Post by David Goldfarb
February
The Test, Sylvain Neuvel
OK, English Wikipedia tells me this isn't part of his series, so who
knows whether I'll see it.

The Marie Brennans are on my list, but I haven't put together time to
assemble and read them yet.
Post by David Goldfarb
May
Binti: the Night Masquerade, Nnedi Okorafor
Good Omens, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
I've definitely read <Good Omens>; I've read two stories about Binti
but it looks like you list #3.
Post by David Goldfarb
August
This is How You Lose the Time War, Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone
I think I have ready access to this so could read it soon.
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.

Most of the books I currently own, plus ones I've taken from the
public libraries' uncatalogued paperback shelves, are in my storage
unit in profoundly inaccessible arrangements. Some are in the
office of a friend of mine, and some are with me. I think the Hines
is at the front of the storage unit where I can actually see and
reach it, but might be part of the architecture of that front so not
readily removed. I think the El-Mohtar/Gladstone is in my friend's
office. The Brennans are in none of these categories, I think; I may
own her entire earlier tetralogy, but don't think I have any of these.
So they'd involve rounding them all up at once from libraries.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
David DeLaney
2020-01-15 11:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
(Bujold has written two *novels* I
hadn't heard about? Oh, they're stand-alone novellas.)
There's, I think, currently _six_ Penric novellas out, plus another that's
ebook-only.

Found out this weekend that she'd put the first three together to make a
hardback, _Penric's Progress_, so I hope the second three shall follow suit?
Post by Joe Bernstein
The Marie Brennans are on my list, but I haven't put together time to
assemble and read them yet.
The four starting with Midnight Never Come? I liked them a good bit. What
happens to a Fae court when it's located actually _under_ London, over the
centuries?
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
First in a series of I think four, at present.
Post by Joe Bernstein
Most of the books I currently own, plus ones I've taken from the
public libraries' uncatalogued paperback shelves, are in my storage
unit in profoundly inaccessible arrangements.
I have the same issue these days in my apartment.

Dave, apartments are cheap in Knoxville; where I live is only up to $400/mo,
for about 675 ft^2
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Robert Woodward
2020-01-15 17:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Joe Bernstein
(Bujold has written two *novels* I
hadn't heard about? Oh, they're stand-alone novellas.)
There's, I think, currently _six_ Penric novellas out, plus another that's
ebook-only.
Found out this weekend that she'd put the first three together to make a
hardback, _Penric's Progress_, so I hope the second three shall follow suit?
May this year, I believe.

<SNIP>
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Joe Bernstein
2020-01-15 18:51:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Joe Bernstein
(Bujold has written two *novels* I
hadn't heard about? Oh, they're stand-alone novellas.)
There's, I think, currently _six_ Penric novellas out, plus another
that's ebook-only.
Really? Ouch. Oddly, the Seattle Public Library has bought all six,
and even more strangely, I found them all on one shelf at once a few
months ago, but while I was dithering whether I could afford to check
them out (in terms of how soon I could read them, weight, stuff like
that), someone else did.
Post by David DeLaney
Found out this weekend that she'd put the first three together to make
a hardback, _Penric's Progress_, so I hope the second three shall
follow suit?
That would help.

For some strange reason she's *much* faster putting novellas out than
novels, so I don't feel as bad for not being current on them.
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Joe Bernstein
The Marie Brennans are on my list, but I haven't put together time to
assemble and read them yet.
The four starting with Midnight Never Come? I liked them a good bit.
What happens to a Fae court when it's located actually _under_ London,
over the centuries?
I liked them too. I liked her first two just enough to read
<Midnight>, but that book alone gave her enough credit with me for a
whole cascade of bad books, should she ever write any, and the
sequels just increased it.

But here I meant the ones the OP listed, however many, whose series
starts with <A Natural History of Dragons>. English Wikipedia claims
there's now five of those.
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Joe Bernstein
Most of the books I currently own, plus ones I've taken from the
public libraries' uncatalogued paperback shelves, are in my storage
unit in profoundly inaccessible arrangements.
I have the same issue these days in my apartment.
No, I'm pretty sure you don't, not unless there's a stack of books
taller than you are in the apartment, which is only kept from
collapsing by being bordered on each side by other things. Some of
which other things are boxes of books, boxes of whose contents I have
a pretty good idea; but the stack itself is sorted by book size and
there's nothing resembling a catalogue of it in my head.

The books in those boxes are profoundly inaccessible *too*, having
been overlapped by the stack's edges, and everything behind the stack,
including more boxes of books, is also profoundly inaccessible, but
the stack itself is the main issue. Its frontal wall is LPs,
buttressed by duplicate copies of books, so no books in the front of
the unit are inaccessible because they need to hold the stack back.
The external hard drive I need to do disc recovery on because the
last people who did that gave me worthless CDs that became unreadable
in five years - well, that *is* part of the frontal wall, so that's a
problem.

You may well have real problems getting to books in your apartment,
maybe even enough so that they're profoundly inaccessible. But I'm
just about sure you don't have *these* problems.

The stack was a solution to a worse problem, mind.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
David Goldfarb
2020-01-22 07:14:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.

(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)

I haven't read the sequels yet, so maybe this is addressed there:
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
--
David Goldfarb |"Do you know what Freud said about dreams of flying?
***@gmail.com | It means you're really dreaming about having sex."
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | "Indeed. Tell me, then, what does it mean when
| you dream about having sex?" -- _Sandman_ #15
Magewolf
2020-01-22 20:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.

Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
Kevrob
2020-01-22 22:04:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.

https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/

Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.

https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.

Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.

Kevin R
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-01-22 22:58:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Kevin R
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2020-01-22 23:05:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
Is it kosher to grab _people_, or other beings? Grab the Spear of
Destiny, and use it to control The Spectre. Ypu might turn the both
of you eeeee-vll, though.

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
h***@gmail.com
2020-01-22 23:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
Is it kosher to grab _people_, or other beings? Grab the Spear of
Destiny, and use it to control The Spectre. Ypu might turn the both
of you eeeee-vll, though.
I have a simple rule.
It's never summon and attempt to control the Spirit of Vengeance.
(I have a related rule about Morpheus)
h***@gmail.com
2020-01-22 23:33:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Kevin R
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit) , what are you referring to?
Ahasuerus
2020-01-23 01:51:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-01-23 03:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
On Thursday, January 23, 2020 at 9:58:37 AM UTC+11, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Ahyep.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
h***@gmail.com
2020-01-23 03:38:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Thanks, that does look like the answer
Kevrob
2020-01-23 16:07:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Thanks, that does look like the answer
Since we'd just been discussing the DC multiverse, I
thought of this apparent hat-tip from one Legion to
another:

https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Akka_(Pre-Zero_Hour)

Kevin R
Leo Sgouros
2020-01-23 17:20:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Thanks, that does look like the answer
Since we'd just been discussing the DC multiverse, I
thought of this apparent hat-tip from one Legion to
https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Akka_(Pre-Zero_Hour)
Kevin R
Following the earl you posted, I came across this.

" When the ring is in place, Saturn Queen suddenly becomes good and uses her mental powers to subdue her fellow evil Legionnaires and Luthor. Superman reveals to the others that when Saturn Queen revealed why she became evil, Superman deduced that it was possibly because she was away from Saturn's rings, which have a special property that made Titanians incapable of criminal or evil activity. With the criminals defeated, the good Legion takes the criminals into custody while Superman returns to the 20th Century to bring Lex back to the authorities to finish his prison term. A fragment of the rings is given to her to make her remain good, while the other supervillains are imprisoned. Superman says future law courts should be lenient on her."
https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Eve_Aries_(Pre-Zero_Hour)

It must be where Terrans got the marriage ring ceremony from ;-)
https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/why-do-couples-exchange-rings-vows-elusive-ancient-origins-wedding-rings-020559
Kevrob
2020-01-24 01:38:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leo Sgouros
Post by Kevrob
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
Hal Jordan's predecessor, Abin Sur, imprisoned a sorcerer within
the ring.
https://greenlantern.fandom.com/wiki/Myrwhydden.
Don't make the mistake of grabbing the weapon of Power Ring of
"Earth-Three's" Crime Syndicate. I'd also stay away from Nabu's
Helmet of Fate or Eclipso's Black Diamond. Diamond Jack's is
probably OK, or the Ibistick. The Ruby of Life could be tricky,
but manageable.
Don't piddle around, go for AKKA!
I assume you aren't meaning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akka_(toolkit),
what are you referring to?
Presumably Jack Williamson's _The Legion of Space_ -- see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legion_of_Space
Thanks, that does look like the answer
Since we'd just been discussing the DC multiverse, I
thought of this apparent hat-tip from one Legion to
https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Akka_(Pre-Zero_Hour)
Kevin R
Following the earl you posted, I came across this.
"When the ring is in place, Saturn Queen suddenly becomes good
and uses her mental powers to subdue her fellow evil Legionnaires
and Luthor. Superman reveals to the others that when Saturn Queen
revealed why she became evil, Superman deduced that it was possibly
because she was away from Saturn's rings, which have a special property
that made Titanians incapable of criminal or evil activity. With the
criminals defeated, the good Legion takes the criminals into custody
while Superman returns to the 20th Century to bring Lex back to the
authorities to finish his prison term. A fragment of the rings is
given to her to make her remain good, while the other supervillains
are imprisoned. Superman says future law courts should be lenient on her."
https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Eve_Aries_(Pre-Zero_Hour)
It must be where Terrans got the marriage ring ceremony from ;-)
https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/why-do-couples-exchange-rings-vows-elusive-ancient-origins-wedding-rings-020559
1961's "SUPERMAN #147." I was in kindergarten, and wouldn't learn
to read until 1st grade. I read the reprint, though. SUPERBOY #147,
(1968) and again in ADVENTURE COMICS #494. (1982) Jerry Siegel wrote it.

Kevin R

h***@gmail.com
2020-01-22 23:26:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by David Goldfarb
December
Libriomancer, Jim C. Hines
I may have reasonable access to this too.
The concept of this one is magicians who can reach inside books
and pull out useful weapons and gadgets. The hook is that he uses
real-world authors and series: for instance, the protagonist grabs
a Klingon disruptor pistol out of a Star Trek novel by A.C. Crispin,
and there are interrogations done using Bujold's fast-penta, with
Bujold mentioned by name.
(I will note that there are several books which are quite important
to the plot that are fictional, however.)
why are these people limiting themselves to prose? Go to superhero
comics and you have yourself a Green Lantern ring, arguably the
finest multi-purpose tool/weapon ever devised. And then there's the
Infinity Gauntlet....
You do not even need to go to comic books. There are a number of prose
novels set in the DC and Marvel universes. Some original, some that are
novelizations. Kingdom Come and two or three of the "Crisis" books
should give you more super-powered artifacts than you could use.
Of course if they come through with all their capabilities A Green
Lantern ring might be a bad choice. Depending on which version you get
it might be keyed to it's wielder's DNA, need their permission to be
used by someone else, or require so much willpower that they are useless
to 99% of the human race.
The original one, wielded by Alan Scott, was a magical artifact.
https://dcmultiversehistorian.wordpress.com/2014/08/17/how-did-alan-scotts-ring-work-pre-new-52-and-how-was-he-eventually-tied-in-with-the-green-lantern-corps/
It's varied a lot with time.
as I understand it the original take was "it's magic" later on it was retconned as a standard green lantern corp ring which had the weakness modified to wood to teach the wearer a lesson (can't help but think that the guardians needed a better HR team with him, Sinestro and Hal Jordan's issues)

it's probably changed multiple times since.
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