Discussion:
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-08 19:27:10 UTC
Permalink
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm

Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?

Lynn
t***@gmail.com
2020-05-08 22:39:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
I enjoy Freefall in general, but I've extra enjoyed how he's presenting
this trip through space. You can tell he's thought a lot about it, including
these two ways to reload reaction mass:
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03426.htm
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03433.htm ***

***this is today's comic (Fri May 8), so for now you can see it at
http://freefall.purrsia.com/default.htm
but I'm assuming it sticks to the numbering pattern in the URL.

Tony
Chrysi Cat
2020-05-09 05:08:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
   http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit.   No legs.  I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
Lynn
I think she's able to pull herself along with the device currently
parked about a metre behind and to the left of her, and that when she
reaches the spot she's intending to work at, the foot bonds magnetically
with the hull.

We've seen this in action once before, when the ship was placing
satellites, because they had to un-jam one of the pods.
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff1000/fv00989.htm
, in particular, shows the maneuvering unit in use.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
p***@hotmail.com
2020-05-09 06:54:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
In his YA novel _Islands in the Sky_ Arthur Clarke describes legless
space suits for use in free fall. These are said to be simpler and
more rugged than the suits used on the surface of the Moon.
The wearer controls the suit's thrusters with their feet. These
were illustrated on the cover of the original hardback Winston
edition:

https://www.dustjackets.com/pages/books/3840/arthur-c-clarke/islands-in-the-sky

Willey Ley described "work suits" to be used in the construction of
a space station. These were spherical capsules holding the occupant,
with reaction control thrusters and multiple sets of robot arms,
allowing the astronaut to hold and orient two or more components
while joining them together or to the station. Ley also described
space suits with gripping devices on the feet for use in free fall.

Peter Wezeman
J. Clarke
2020-05-09 14:05:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
In his YA novel _Islands in the Sky_ Arthur Clarke describes legless
space suits for use in free fall. These are said to be simpler and
more rugged than the suits used on the surface of the Moon.
The wearer controls the suit's thrusters with their feet. These
were illustrated on the cover of the original hardback Winston
https://www.dustjackets.com/pages/books/3840/arthur-c-clarke/islands-in-the-sky
Willey Ley described "work suits" to be used in the construction of
a space station. These were spherical capsules holding the occupant,
with reaction control thrusters and multiple sets of robot arms,
allowing the astronaut to hold and orient two or more components
while joining them together or to the station. Ley also described
space suits with gripping devices on the feet for use in free fall.
Here's a classic from Disney


Lest you be dismissive of Disney as an authority on space flight, note
that the person giving the explantion is von Braun. The space suit
starts at 3:00.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-09 14:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
In his YA novel _Islands in the Sky_ Arthur Clarke describes legless
space suits for use in free fall. These are said to be simpler and
more rugged than the suits used on the surface of the Moon.
The wearer controls the suit's thrusters with their feet. These
were illustrated on the cover of the original hardback Winston
https://www.dustjackets.com/pages/books/3840/arthur-c-clarke/islands-in-the-sky
Willey Ley described "work suits" to be used in the construction of
a space station. These were spherical capsules holding the occupant,
with reaction control thrusters and multiple sets of robot arms,
allowing the astronaut to hold and orient two or more components
while joining them together or to the station. Ley also described
space suits with gripping devices on the feet for use in free fall.
Here's a classic from Disney
http://youtu.be/Zjs3nBfyIwM
Lest you be dismissive of Disney as an authority on space flight, note
that the person giving the explantion is von Braun. The space suit
starts at 3:00.
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.

Ley wrote a monthly science column for _Galaxy_ back in the day,
and I remember him talking about working with Disney, and
somebody suggested an instrument with a transparent sphere around
a model of the earth, with lights in it to show where satellites
were in orbit. And the scientists were musing, "Now, how would
one build that?" and one of the Disney artists brought them back
down to earth with "Y'know, here at Disney, we just *draw*
things."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Quadibloc
2020-05-09 16:06:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.
No, your memory is not playing tricks on you. Walt Disney Presents moved to NBC
(from ABC) and became Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color in 1961. But Disney
had ensured many of the earlier shows were _filmed_ in color, so that they would
be useful in future.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-09 16:59:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.
No, your memory is not playing tricks on you. Walt Disney Presents moved to NBC
(from ABC) and became Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color in 1961. But Disney
had ensured many of the earlier shows were _filmed_ in color, so that they would
be useful in future.
Ah! What excellent forethought!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2020-05-09 18:59:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.
No, your memory is not playing tricks on you. Walt Disney Presents moved to NBC
(from ABC) and became Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color in 1961. But Disney
had ensured many of the earlier shows were _filmed_ in color, so that they would
be useful in future.
Ah! What excellent forethought!
Snow White had already been re-released twice by that time, so Disney
understood the value of their archive.
Kevrob
2020-05-12 21:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.
No, your memory is not playing tricks on you. Walt Disney Presents moved to NBC
(from ABC) and became Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color in 1961. But Disney
had ensured many of the earlier shows were _filmed_ in color, so that they would
be useful in future.
Ah! What excellent forethought!
53 of the 104, 1954-1958's seasons 3 through 6, of "The Adventures of
Superman" were shot in color, and that program was syndicated. Once
more and more stations could broadcast in color, the oft-repeated
episodes stood out among black & white repeats. Disney could always
release the TV shows theatrically abroad, especially where WWoC did
not air, so color was a good investment. National/DC controlled the
rights to their Superman show, so they figures ponying up for color
was worth the money, too.

Kevin R

J. Clarke
2020-05-09 18:56:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
Freefall: Florence is checking the spaceship for micro collision damage
http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3500/fc03432.htm
Florence (the hybrid wolf) is wearing a sack space suit. No legs. I
wonder how she gets about on the hull ?
In his YA novel _Islands in the Sky_ Arthur Clarke describes legless
space suits for use in free fall. These are said to be simpler and
more rugged than the suits used on the surface of the Moon.
The wearer controls the suit's thrusters with their feet. These
were illustrated on the cover of the original hardback Winston
https://www.dustjackets.com/pages/books/3840/arthur-c-clarke/islands-in-the-sky
Willey Ley described "work suits" to be used in the construction of
a space station. These were spherical capsules holding the occupant,
with reaction control thrusters and multiple sets of robot arms,
allowing the astronaut to hold and orient two or more components
while joining them together or to the station. Ley also described
space suits with gripping devices on the feet for use in free fall.
Here's a classic from Disney
http://youtu.be/Zjs3nBfyIwM
Lest you be dismissive of Disney as an authority on space flight, note
that the person giving the explantion is von Braun. The space suit
starts at 3:00.
Interesting. I didn't remember the Disney program going to color
as early as 1955, but I guess it did.
The show went color in 1961 with the move to NBC. I don't know if
those particular episodes were shot on color film or were colorized
later.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Ley wrote a monthly science column for _Galaxy_ back in the day,
and I remember him talking about working with Disney, and
somebody suggested an instrument with a transparent sphere around
a model of the earth, with lights in it to show where satellites
were in orbit. And the scientists were musing, "Now, how would
one build that?" and one of the Disney artists brought them back
down to earth with "Y'know, here at Disney, we just *draw*
things."
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