Discussion:
A Midsummer Tempest
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Michael F. Stemper
2021-06-03 17:24:33 UTC
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The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
she sees:

1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize

(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)

The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
identities:

1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?

Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
--
Michael F. Stemper
Galatians 3:28
Kevrob
2021-06-03 21:43:16 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
--
Does (3) bear a harp, or is a harp emblazoned on his garb?
--
Kevin R
Michael F. Stemper
2021-06-04 12:37:04 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
Does (3) bear a harp, or is a harp emblazoned on his garb?
You'll have to decide what you think Anderson meant; it's a direct quote
with no words omitted.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.
David Johnston
2021-06-04 03:16:54 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
   brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
   bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
   with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
   farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
   and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
the Chinese guy is Li Bai, master of Drunken Poetry. The last guy seems
like just a generic Cherokee. .
Moriarty
2021-06-04 03:59:20 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I've just done a text search through Galactic Patrol and Grey Lensman and I don't believe his hair colour is mentioned.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
the Chinese guy is Li Bai, master of Drunken Poetry. The last guy seems
like just a generic Cherokee. .
The ID'd ones are specific enough to make me think none of them are generic. The famous photo of Sitting Bull has him with a calumet, but no idea about the maize.

-Moriarty
David Johnston
2021-06-04 05:17:00 UTC
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Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I've just done a text search through Galactic Patrol and Grey Lensman and I don't believe his hair colour is mentioned.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
the Chinese guy is Li Bai, master of Drunken Poetry. The last guy seems
like just a generic Cherokee. .
The ID'd ones are specific enough to make me think none of them are generic. The famous photo of Sitting Bull has him with a calumet, but no idea about the maize.
The Green Corn and Calumet ceremonies were the two most important
rituals in the religion of most southern (United States) native
communities. Both involved wearing feathers. While he could have had a
specific native or native mythological figure (Coyote?) in mind,
probably did, his description is entirely generic within those
geographic bounds.
J. Clarke
2021-06-04 08:29:15 UTC
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 20:59:20 -0700 (PDT), Moriarty
Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I've just done a text search through Galactic Patrol and Grey Lensman and I don't believe his hair colour is mentioned.
About the only thing we can be sure of is that he doesn't have both
red-bronze hair and gold-flecked tawny eyes.
Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
the Chinese guy is Li Bai, master of Drunken Poetry. The last guy seems
like just a generic Cherokee. .
The ID'd ones are specific enough to make me think none of them are generic. The famous photo of Sitting Bull has him with a calumet, but no idea about the maize.
-Moriarty
Andrew McDowell
2021-06-04 12:54:53 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 20:59:20 -0700 (PDT), Moriarty
Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I've just done a text search through Galactic Patrol and Grey Lensman and I don't believe his hair colour is mentioned.
About the only thing we can be sure of is that he doesn't have both
red-bronze hair and gold-flecked tawny eyes.
(trimmed)

At the beginning of the first chapter of "Children of the Lens"

Galactic Coordinator Kimball Kinisson finished his second cup of Tellurian coffee, got up from the breakfast table, and prowled about in black abstraction. Twenty-odd years had changed him but little. He weighed the same, or a few pounds less; although a little of his mass had shifted downward from his mighty chest and shoulders. His hair was still brown; his stern face was only faintly lined....

(the redistibution of weight stuck in my mind - I first read this when I was younger than the newly minted Grey Lensman, and now I am older than the Galactic Co-ordinator, and correspondingly more aged. Given the feeling that people need to find role models similar to themselves for inspiration, perhaps I should be looking for scrawny action heroes (never having had mighty chest or shoulders) with short sight and grey hair" :-))
J. Clarke
2021-06-04 16:22:57 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 05:54:53 -0700 (PDT), Andrew McDowell
Post by Andrew McDowell
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 20:59:20 -0700 (PDT), Moriarty
Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I've just done a text search through Galactic Patrol and Grey Lensman and I don't believe his hair colour is mentioned.
About the only thing we can be sure of is that he doesn't have both
red-bronze hair and gold-flecked tawny eyes.
(trimmed)
At the beginning of the first chapter of "Children of the Lens"
Galactic Coordinator Kimball Kinisson finished his second cup of Tellurian coffee, got up from the breakfast table, and prowled about in black abstraction. Twenty-odd years had changed him but little. He weighed the same, or a few pounds less; although a little of his mass had shifted downward from his mighty chest and shoulders. His hair was still brown; his stern face was only faintly lined....
(the redistibution of weight stuck in my mind - I first read this when I was younger than the newly minted Grey Lensman, and now I am older than the Galactic Co-ordinator, and correspondingly more aged. Given the feeling that people need to find role models similar to themselves for inspiration, perhaps I should be looking for scrawny action heroes (never having had mighty chest or shoulders) with short sight and grey hair" :-))
OK, that's official then--brown for Kinnison.
Robert Woodward
2021-06-04 05:04:40 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Post by Michael F. Stemper
5. Holmes and Watson
6. Huck and Jim
7. ?
Are my guesses correct? Who are the other folks?
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
David Johnston
2021-06-04 05:21:29 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.

Loading Image...

Surprisingly good cover art.
Ted Nolan
2021-06-04 06:08:11 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
https://www.writeups.org/wp-content/uploads/Astounding-Grey-Lensman-1939-cover-pulps.jpg
Surprisingly good cover art.
Apparently (Hubert) Rogers:

Loading Image...
Scott Lurndal
2021-06-04 15:29:02 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
Let us not be fooled into thinking that the artwork accurately
represents what the writer intended. Old-timers will remember my
complaints about what I got for the cover of _The Interior Life._
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
Dimensional Traveler
2021-06-05 01:07:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
Let us not be fooled into thinking that the artwork accurately
represents what the writer intended. Old-timers will remember my
complaints about what I got for the cover of _The Interior Life._
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
--
Troll, troll, troll your post gently down the thread
Angrily, angrily, angrily, the net's a nut's scream.
Jerry Brown
2021-06-05 06:43:50 UTC
Reply
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On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
the group: <***@mn.uswest.net>.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
J. Clarke
2021-06-05 10:30:57 UTC
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On Sat, 05 Jun 2021 07:43:50 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
And here's a link to it that the rest of us may be able to see:
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.arts.sf.written/c/Tim6n_TtZDQ/m/ed-xDKBbveMJ>

However I will quote the comment here:
"Jesus Christ! I hadn't seen *that* one...

I suppose it's too late to sue Heyne for slander... the damage
is doubtless done.

("Jim! I take it all back! My Baen covers are great!")

Arrgh...

Lois."
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 13:40:10 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2021-06-05 15:04:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
--
Troll, troll, troll your post gently down the thread
Angrily, angrily, angrily, the net's a nut's scream.
Michael F. Stemper
2021-06-05 15:53:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm.  That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
Although thunderbird treats it as such, I think that it's a message ID.
--
Michael F. Stemper
87.3% of all statistics are made up by the person giving them.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 16:03:36 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm.  That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
Although thunderbird treats it as such, I think that it's a message ID.
Whatever it is, I couldn't read it; perhaps it's as well. If
that gargoyle's face were put on a book of mine, I would be
inclined to use bad language. I got sufficiently verbal about
the 1940s prom dress (and pageboy hairdo to match) on _The
Interior Life._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 16:01:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
Oh, well, that would explain it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2021-06-05 16:26:52 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 5 Jun 2021 08:04:16 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
Not to get /too/ pedantic, but it is more likely a "Message-id", as
Agent puts it.

Agent couldn't actually /find/ it, however.

Bit-rot? Or just not on Eternal September?
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Scott Lurndal
2021-06-05 16:46:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is

Message-ID: <s9g3pf$gl8$***@dont-email.me>
Kevrob
2021-06-05 17:17:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
Try it here:

http://al.howardknight.net/
--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Dimensional Traveler
2021-06-05 19:31:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
http://al.howardknight.net/
That gives me "Error: Article not found." when I search but thank you
for the effort.
--
Troll, troll, troll your post gently down the thread
Angrily, angrily, angrily, the net's a nut's scream.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 20:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
http://al.howardknight.net/
I got "Error: Article not found." Whether or not I added angle
brackets (which I assume meant < > , was that right?)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2021-06-05 22:06:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
http://al.howardknight.net/
I got "Error: Article not found." Whether or not I added angle
brackets (which I assume meant < > , was that right?)
--
The article might be to old. I can't read the Message ID because
Google groups truncates it. If someone posted the characters
after <s9g3pf$gl8$1 bu before the @ sign I could try to look it up.
--
Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 17:05:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
I got "server not found."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2021-06-06 16:48:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Its an email address.
No, it's an unique message id. Many newsreaders can search by
the message-id header (the message id for your post is
I got "server not found."
Which is probably the entire point of using "dont-email-me" as the
server name.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Jerry Brown
2021-06-06 06:37:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Apologies; my Forte Agent correctly interprets it as message id and
fetches the post, but it looks like other newreaders don't.

J Clark has kindly replied to my original post with a copy of LMB's
post, as well as a link to the full thread (from two decades ago!) via
google groups.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Holy sweet Mother Machree! There's a man who got full value from his
orthodontia!
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
J. Clarke
2021-06-06 10:29:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 06 Jun 2021 07:37:39 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Apologies; my Forte Agent correctly interprets it as message id and
fetches the post, but it looks like other newreaders don't.
FWIW, I have Agent as well--it reports that it's "searching on all
news servers" (by which I presume it means that it is searching on all
servers to which I have provided it connection information) and then
fails to find the message.

I suspect its availability depends on the extent of the archive
maintained by whatever providers one is using.

I also use Forte's USENET service (I know there are free
services--I've tried them and found that I got what I paid for). Their
retention is a little under 18 years so it's reasonable that they
would not have that thread in their archive.

I see you're using giganews, which claimes "highest quality retention
since 1994" and "17+ years of text retention", so perhaps they go back
a bit longer.
Post by Jerry Brown
J Clark has kindly replied to my original post with a copy of LMB's
post, as well as a link to the full thread (from two decades ago!) via
google groups.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Holy sweet Mother Machree! There's a man who got full value from his
orthodontia!
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-06 15:33:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Apologies; my Forte Agent correctly interprets it as message id and
fetches the post, but it looks like other newreaders don't.
J Clark has kindly replied to my original post with a copy of LMB's
post, as well as a link to the full thread (from two decades ago!) via
google groups.
Well, I don't know from Google Groups; can you just quote the
juicy bits"
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Holy sweet Mother Machree! There's a man who got full value from his
orthodontia!
Yeah.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2021-06-06 16:40:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Apologies; my Forte Agent correctly interprets it as message id and
fetches the post, but it looks like other newreaders don't.
J Clark has kindly replied to my original post with a copy of LMB's
post, as well as a link to the full thread (from two decades ago!) via
google groups.
Well, I don't know from Google Groups; can you just quote the
juicy bits"
Google Groups is Google's attempt at destroying Usenet. Their "search"
function has been nerfed many, MANY times. Deliberately.
--
Troll, troll, troll your post gently down the thread
Angrily, angrily, angrily, the net's a nut's scream.
J. Clarke
2021-06-06 20:28:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jun 2021 09:40:57 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 18:07:31 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Scott Lurndal
Or the German cover for _The Warriors Apprentice_ (Der Kadett Roman).
I think that might be the one I commented on with "Would you buy a used
spaceship from this person?"
Here's Bujold's response, back from the days when she participated in
Hm. That link doesn't work for me.
Apologies; my Forte Agent correctly interprets it as message id and
fetches the post, but it looks like other newreaders don't.
J Clark has kindly replied to my original post with a copy of LMB's
post, as well as a link to the full thread (from two decades ago!) via
google groups.
Well, I don't know from Google Groups; can you just quote the
juicy bits"
Google Groups is Google's attempt at destroying Usenet. Their "search"
function has been nerfed many, MANY times. Deliberately.
Did my post get lost in the ozone somehow? Here's what I posted:

----------------------------------------------------------------
And here's a link to it that the rest of us may be able to see:
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.arts.sf.written/c/Tim6n_TtZDQ/m/ed-xDKBbveMJ>

However I will quote the comment here:
"Jesus Christ! I hadn't seen *that* one...

I suppose it's too late to sue Heyne for slander... the damage
is doubtless done.

("Jim! I take it all back! My Baen covers are great!")

Arrgh...

Lois."

---------------------------------------------------------------

Please note that the link above goes to the thread. I believe this
one goes directly to her post:
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.arts.sf.written/c/Tim6n_TtZDQ/m/NWmnhFSZx6oJ>
David Johnston
2021-06-04 21:18:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
(Numbering mine for the sake of this post)
The "pipe-smoking Victorian" clued me in that these were references
to people who existed outside of the story. My guesses as to their
1. St. Francis of Assisi
2. ?
3. ?
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
Let us not be fooled into thinking that the artwork accurately
represents what the writer intended.
Thing is, it does. I don't remember any description of Kinnison's hair
(which wouldn't be surprising if it was brown) but this is clearly an
illustration by an artist who read the story. That's what surprises me
about it.

Old-timers will remember my
complaints about what I got for the cover of _The Interior Life._
Jerry Brown
2021-06-04 06:16:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 23:21:29 -0600, David Johnston
<snip>
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Michael F. Stemper
4. Kimball Kinnison (although I never thought of him as blond)
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
https://www.writeups.org/wp-content/uploads/Astounding-Grey-Lensman-1939-cover-pulps.jpg
Surprisingly good cover art.
As a UKer, I was surprised to see the spelling as "Grey" rather than
"Gray", when I'd previously believed that the latter was correct for
the US.

I'm sure I recall Gharlane ranting about it a couple of decades ago.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Jack Bohn
2021-06-04 13:08:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 23:21:29 -0600, David Johnston
<snip>
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Woodward
I am fairly certain Kimball Kinnison was not a blond. There were many
human gray lensmen
Well he sure wasn't drawn that way.
https://www.writeups.org/wp-content/uploads/Astounding-Grey-Lensman-1939-cover-pulps.jpg
As a UKer, I was surprised to see the spelling as "Grey" rather than
"Gray", when I'd previously believed that the latter was correct for
the US.
I'm sure I recall Gharlane ranting about it a couple of decades ago.
Well, we (in the body of Noah Webster) did vow to do nothing the way our parents did, but there are old habits.
I wonder if the existence of Grey as a surname kept things more in flux than most changed spellings.
Hmm... Gray also exists as a surname. Revolutionary Greys?
Or a variation from before Samuel Johnson laid down the law?
It seems First Folio _Macbeth_ has a witch talking to her "Gray-Malkin."

[ObSF: George O. Smith has an anecdote about staying one summer weekend with Henry Kutner and C.L. Moore:
He knew they were up when he heard typing, so he got up and had coffee in the kitchen with them, sequentially.
It only later occurred to him that one had left for a while before the other showed up, and the sound of the typewriter had never stopped.
An editor he shared the story with said that the typescripts that came in would change the spelling of grey/gray, but there was no telling which went with which writer.]
--
-Jack
Quadibloc
2021-06-05 05:54:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 13:46:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
They would certainly be appropriate characters to be seen there.

I wonder if instead they appeared in the short story "House
Rule," in which we see Abelard and Heloise (each from a timeline
where the other is dead), and Einstein, and some other scientist
(from an earlier century) whom I can't remember. They start
talking physics, and the innkeeper comes over and shuts them up:
the house rule is that no one can tell anyone else anything about
(an approximation of) his future. I don't believe I have a copy
of that story any more.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Michael F. Stemper
2021-06-05 16:00:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
It was Matuchek who was looking around. Since everybody described was
male, she wasn't even seeing herself in the (probably non-existent)
mirror behind the bar.

In theory, I suppose that Carlsen, who's not explicitly mentioned in the
Epilogue, was probably blond, being Danish. However, it's unlikely that
he ever went through Lensman training.
--
Michael F. Stemper
87.3% of all statistics are made up by the person giving them.
J. Clarke
2021-06-05 16:50:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 5 Jun 2021 11:00:04 -0500, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
It was Matuchek who was looking around. Since everybody described was
male, she wasn't even seeing herself in the (probably non-existent)
mirror behind the bar.
In theory, I suppose that Carlsen, who's not explicitly mentioned in the
Epilogue, was probably blond, being Danish. However, it's unlikely that
he ever went through Lensman training.
A while back I watched through all seasons of Bron/Broen
(Swedish/Danish TV series with action surrounding a crime committed
straddling the border of the two countries) and one thing that struck
me was the paucity of blondes.
Kevrob
2021-06-05 17:30:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 5 Jun 2021 11:00:04 -0500, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
It was Matuchek who was looking around. Since everybody described was
male, she wasn't even seeing herself in the (probably non-existent)
mirror behind the bar.
In theory, I suppose that Carlsen, who's not explicitly mentioned in the
Epilogue, was probably blond, being Danish. However, it's unlikely that
he ever went through Lensman training.
A while back I watched through all seasons of Bron/Broen
(Swedish/Danish TV series with action surrounding a crime committed
straddling the border of the two countries) and one thing that struck
me was the paucity of blondes.
The blondes are an export commodity? :)

See also: only a minority of the Irish have red hair.
--
Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-05 17:06:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as
any of the less
Post by Quadibloc
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
It was Matuchek who was looking around. Since everybody described was
male, she wasn't even seeing herself in the (probably non-existent)
mirror behind the bar.
In theory, I suppose that Carlsen, who's not explicitly mentioned in the
Epilogue, was probably blond, being Danish. However, it's unlikely that
he ever went through Lensman training.
Now THERE's a fanfic waiting to be written.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
David Johnston
2021-06-07 00:02:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
I found a review of A Midsummer Tempest which mentions that Valeria Matuchek
and Holger Carlsen were in the Old Phoenix. Whether they qualify as any of the less
obvious members of your group of seven - or they have nothing to do with them,
being from an earlier apparition of that place in the book - I cannot say.
John Savard
I wondered whether Holger was harp guy but couldn't remember any harp
themed clothing. Vareria is the viewpoint character. The described
chacters are who she is seeing.
Moriarty
2021-06-06 23:00:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
A bit of googling suggests this guy is Golias from John Myers Myers' "Silverlock". Apparently Poul Anderson *loved* that book.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
The same source suggests this could be Hiawatha, from Longfellow's poem not the historical figure.

http://poulandersonappreciation.blogspot.com/2016/02/a-large-gathering.html

I loved the description of Jim Baen's editorial for an edition of "Silverlock" he published, where Anderson, Niven and Pournelle demanded he publish it and threatened to break his arms if he didn't.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-06-07 00:43:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The epilogue to Anderson's _A Midsummer Tempest_ is set in "the
taproom of The Old Phoenix". A character looks around it, and
1. brown-robed monk at whose feet lay a wolf
2. gorgeously drunk Chinese from long ago whose calligraphic
brush was tracing a poem
3. rangy fellow nearby whose garb was hard to place but
bore a harp
A bit of googling suggests this guy is Golias from John Myers Myers'
"Silverlock". Apparently Poul Anderson *loved* that book.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
4. large affable blond man in high boots and gray leather
with an iridescent jewel on his wrist.
5. lean pipe-smoking Victorian and his slightly lame companion
6. wide-eyed freckle-faced boy and Negro man in tatterdemalion
farm clothes
7. coppery-skinned feather-crowned warrior who held a calumet
and a green ear of maize
The same source suggests this could be Hiawatha, from Longfellow's poem
not the historical figure.
http://poulandersonappreciation.blogspot.com/2016/02/a-large-gathering.html
I loved the description of Jim Baen's editorial for an edition of
"Silverlock" he published, where Anderson, Niven and Pournelle demanded
he publish it and threatened to break his arms if he didn't.
And publish it he did, and I used to have a copy. That was 1966;
I think Karen Anderson recommended that I read it, and I did, but
now I remember almost nothing about it, except that Silverlock
failed to heed the verse that begins "A little learning is a
dangerous thing."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
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