Discussion:
Series, Books, Trilogies Woffle.
(too old to reply)
Titus G
2019-08-07 04:22:17 UTC
Permalink
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.

Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.

Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.

The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).

The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2019-08-07 04:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
And "The Foundation Trilogy" was a completely arbitrary construction.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-07 06:22:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
And "The Foundation Trilogy" was a completely arbitrary construction.
It was a series of fix-up novels constructed out of short stories
and novellae published in _Astounding._ But it did come in three
volumes!

And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2019-08-07 15:47:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
And "The Foundation Trilogy" was a completely arbitrary construction.
It was a series of fix-up novels constructed out of short stories
and novellae published in _Astounding._ But it did come in three
volumes!
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-07 16:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
And "The Foundation Trilogy" was a completely arbitrary construction.
It was a series of fix-up novels constructed out of short stories
and novellae published in _Astounding._ But it did come in three
volumes!
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-08-07 17:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
And "The Foundation Trilogy" was a completely arbitrary construction.
It was a series of fix-up novels constructed out of short stories
and novellae published in _Astounding._ But it did come in three
volumes!
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
I can remember stocking a seven-volume boxed set at the bookstores,
from HarperCollins in paperback: one for each "book" and one for the
appendices. There was a similar hardcover set known as "the Millennium
Edition," from Houghton Mifflin, released in 1999. The Harper paperback
set was from 2004.

https://www.abebooks.com/9780618037667/Lord-Rings-Millennium-Edition-Tolkien-0618037667/plp

https://www.worldcat.org/title/lord-of-the-rings/oclc/42949158

Kevin R
Gene Wirchenko
2019-08-07 20:37:04 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Aug 2019 16:05:15 GMT, ***@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt)
wrote:

[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
And let us not forget the appendices so seven books!

Seven books for the rasfw crowd ... ?

My dad once took out a one-volume omnibus LOTR.

One vol to rule them all ... ?

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Kevrob
2019-08-07 21:16:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gene Wirchenko
[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
And let us not forget the appendices so seven books!
Seven books for the rasfw crowd ... ?
My dad once took out a one-volume omnibus LOTR.
One vol to rule them all ... ?
I remember selling those, too.

The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.

https://preview.tinyurl.com/Red-Westmarch OR

https://tinyurl.com/Red-Westmarch which is

https://www.abebooks.com/Lord-Rings-J-R-R-Tolkien/22540592604/bd?cm_mmc=ggl-_-US_Shopp_Trade-_-used-_-naa&gclid=CjwKCAjw7anqBRALEiwAgvGgm74le9cfOR-cINUm26nNVrdZqfwe0sHslgbC4QYGhSZByjyvJYcc2xoCvPoQAvD_BwE

There were also one-volume versions with regular board covers
and the dust jacket.

I always thought the "Red Book" should have been all 4 books.

Kevin R
Magewolf
2019-08-08 16:11:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-08 16:53:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.

_The Hobbit_ was there.

So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Moriarty
2019-08-08 21:44:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the only one.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-08 23:29:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien,
children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the
only one.
I envy you. I never encountered Tolkien AT ALL until I was
browsing through the children's library looking for something
uncomplicated to read, and hit upon _The Hobbit._ I was, as I
said upthread, a graduate student.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Moriarty
2019-08-09 00:31:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien,
children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the
only one.
I envy you. I never encountered Tolkien AT ALL until I was
browsing through the children's library looking for something
uncomplicated to read, and hit upon _The Hobbit._ I was, as I
said upthread, a graduate student.
My 6th grade teacher got us to read "The Hobbit" in class, for which I never thanked her. I read LOTR right after we finished.

Bizarrely, my first Tolkien was down to my 5th grade teacher who read "Farmer Giles of Ham" to us. I've never bothered to re-read it. Maybe I should.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-09 01:22:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien,
children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the
only one.
I envy you. I never encountered Tolkien AT ALL until I was
browsing through the children's library looking for something
uncomplicated to read, and hit upon _The Hobbit._ I was, as I
said upthread, a graduate student.
My 6th grade teacher got us to read "The Hobbit" in class, for which I
never thanked her. I read LOTR right after we finished.
Bizarrely, my first Tolkien was down to my 5th grade teacher who read
"Farmer Giles of Ham" to us. I've never bothered to re-read it. Maybe I
should.
You can if you want. It's minor, and it's full of academic
in-jokes which you may or may not get.

Like the bit in _LotR_ in which the Witch-king, "not by the hand
of man shall he fall," is killed by the combined efforts of a
woman and a hobbit; only on a smaller scale.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Peter Trei
2019-08-09 03:28:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien,
children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the
only one.
I envy you. I never encountered Tolkien AT ALL until I was
browsing through the children's library looking for something
uncomplicated to read, and hit upon _The Hobbit._ I was, as I
said upthread, a graduate student.
My 6th grade teacher got us to read "The Hobbit" in class, for which I never thanked her. I read LOTR right after we finished.
Bizarrely, my first Tolkien was down to my 5th grade teacher who read "Farmer Giles of Ham" to us. I've never bothered to re-read it. Maybe I should.
I had an English teacher who read my class 'The Hobbit', when I was 11 or 12.
I'm pretty certain he did this because he thought it was easier than actually
teaching anything.

pt
Stephen Harker
2019-08-09 08:49:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Magewolf
Post by Kevrob
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My small town library back in the late 70's had the green Hobbit out on
the shelves in the children's section. Which I always thought was a
shame. It was a very nice looking and feeling book that was being torn
to pieces.
I think I can top that. When I was a graduate student,
children's books were kept (understandably) in the Education
Library, for access by those who planned to be teachers.
_The Hobbit_ was there.
So was _The Lord of the Rings._ Some librarian (I like to think
she'd had the flu or a headache or just generally an off day) had
gone no further than to think, "Oh, yeah, Tolkien, he writes
children's books," and thought no further.
Alternatively, the librarian may have thought "Oh, yeah, Tolkien,
children read his books." I read LOTR in 6th grade and I doubt I'm the
only one.
I envy you. I never encountered Tolkien AT ALL until I was
browsing through the children's library looking for something
uncomplicated to read, and hit upon _The Hobbit._ I was, as I
said upthread, a graduate student.
I read Tolkien at age eight. My mother had both _The Hobbit_ and LOTR
and so I read both. My older brother had read it, so I guess it was a
challenge.
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
was: http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
now: http://members.iinet.net.au/~***@netspace.net.au/
or: http://members.iinet.net.au/~sjharker_nbn/
Bice
2019-08-09 12:15:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
I remember selling those, too.
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My wife bought me those editions as a Christmas present many years ago
after I'd worn out my paperback copies. Definitely in the "prized
possessions" category. I particularly like that version of the Lord
of the Rings because it has a big, fold-out map of Middle Earth glued
onto the inside of the back cover.

-- Bob
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-09 14:34:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bice
Post by Kevrob
I remember selling those, too.
The priciest ones were the 1-volume, forest green "Hobbit,"
and the red "Lord of The Rings" - The Red Book of Westmarch,
as it were - both in slipcases.
My wife bought me those editions as a Christmas present many years ago
after I'd worn out my paperback copies. Definitely in the "prized
possessions" category. I particularly like that version of the Lord
of the Rings because it has a big, fold-out map of Middle Earth glued
onto the inside of the back cover.
Most of the hardback editions of LotR have (or had, I've had mine
for decades) those maps, done (if you read the fine print) by
CJRT.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-07 21:03:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gene Wirchenko
[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
And let us not forget the appendices so seven books!
Seven books for the rasfw crowd ... ?
My dad once took out a one-volume omnibus LOTR.
One vol to rule them all ... ?
Yes, I've seen that edition occasionally. Red binding, thin
paper, about four inches thick.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Gene Wirchenko
2019-08-08 20:08:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gene Wirchenko
[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And of course _The Lord of the Rings_ isn't a trilogy; it's that
Victorian phenomenon, a three-volume novel.
Shouldn't it be considered a hexology since IIRC each volume has two
"books" within it?
Althought _LotR_ is (as I said above) properly a three-volume
novel, people call it a trilogy ... but it contains six "books."
I have never observed anyone calling it a hexology.
And let us not forget the appendices so seven books!
Seven books for the rasfw crowd ... ?
My dad once took out a one-volume omnibus LOTR.
One vol to rule them all ... ?
Yes, I've seen that edition occasionally. Red binding, thin
paper, about four inches thick.
I just remember that it was about 2 1/2" thick and had very thin
paper. It was awkward to read. The spine went into a reverse C which
some thick paperbacks do.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Scott Lurndal
2019-08-07 14:54:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
I'd recommend very highly Michelle West's 20-some-odd book Essaylian
series (House War, Sun Sword, Sacred Hunt). The final book of the
House War series (_War_) was published last month.

Excellent writing, and I don't think Dorothy's eight deadly words apply.
Titus G
2019-08-08 05:05:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
Game of Thrones, oops, when Martin stopped, I stopped and watched the
idiot box instead but it was probably several intertwined books rather
than a series and I can't remember but doubt whether they could be
individually called stand alone books so my vote is that that series is
1 even longer book.
Rothfuss' epic 2 book trilogy is really only 2/3rds of 1 book.
The Gormenghast Trilogy was almost a real trilogy. 3 separate stand
alone books (but the third book would be nonsensicalwithout the first two.).
The Deptford Trilogy was a real trilogy. 3 separate stand alone books
(but best read in sequence).
I'd recommend very highly Michelle West's 20-some-odd book Essaylian
series (House War, Sun Sword, Sacred Hunt). The final book of the
House War series (_War_) was published last month.
Excellent writing, and I don't think Dorothy's eight deadly words apply.
By the look of the cover art on Fantastic Fiction and the blurb for The
Hidden City which sounded a very similar plot to my introduction to a
mediocre Brandon Sanderson, I am reluctant to seek further but would you
please suggest just one book to begin with? Are they stand alone books?
I am not keen on YA, romance, religious and other supernatural events in
large doses. Thank you.
Jack Bohn
2019-08-08 16:14:38 UTC
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Post by Titus G
I am currently enjoying the Exordium 5 book Series by Sherwood Smith and
Dave Trowbridge but suspect it is only 1 book of 2.5 to 3 thousand pages
as I think of a series as a number of complete independent episodes as
in character based crime or detective series.
My library had a book titled something like _Librarian's Guide to Series Fiction_, that recommended series of literary merit. I remember two sea-fi examples: Forrester's Hornblower series for development of the character across the series, and Nordoff & Hall's Bounty trilogy for exploring different aspects of the story. (The casebooks of Sherlock Holmes were included with some bafflegab my cynical mind translated as: "patrons are going to keep asking for him, at least he's not Mike Hammer.") So there has been a push since at least the '70s for "part of a larger story" over "just another story." How tolerance has grown for increasingly less well hidden lack of conclusion in books I don't know.
--
-Jack
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