Discussion:
Boring Parts of Future History
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Jack Bohn
2019-05-23 16:54:06 UTC
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One other helpful feature of explainxkcd.com is crosslinks to comics on similar thoughts.
https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/2152:_Westerns

Is about Westerns as a genre lasting longer than the Wild West period. There's a link to a post about the question whether the length of all the movies about World War II adds up to more time than the war years. This can be extended up and down. The Grandeur That Was Rome has been talked about since folks realized Rome was grander than what was around them. The Kennedy assassination footage takes longer to view than the event; documentaries and docudramas stretches the definition: if they cover preparations and root causes, shouldn't our measure of the Real Time of the event, too?

But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the 19-oughts." Are there any future histories where the timeline is marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
--
-Jack
Ahasuerus
2019-05-23 17:00:56 UTC
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On Thursday, May 23, 2019 at 12:54:10 PM UTC-4, Jack Bohn wrote:
[snip]
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. [snip]
Regency romance!
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-23 17:47:49 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
[snip]
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. [snip]
Regency romance!
As a subset of the Napoleonic Wars.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2019-05-23 18:05:17 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
[snip]
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. [snip]
Regency romance!
As a subset of the Napoleonic Wars.
"The battlefields are smaller, but the action is just as intense!"
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-23 17:47:14 UTC
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Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.

Are there any future histories where the timeline is
Post by Jack Bohn
marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
Well, I have currently on the back burner a space opera whose
timeline includes (for some senses of "includes") The Interregnum,
a several-centuries period during which technology suffered a
hit, there was no space travel, and a lot of things that happened
before it have become the stuff of myth and legend. This
includes _inter alia_ how Mars and Venus were terraformed.

I did this so that I could have a desertish Mars and a swampish
Venus in my space opera, as all true space operas ought to have.
I may even take it off the back burner someday.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-05-23 19:55:56 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Are there any future histories where the timeline is
Post by Jack Bohn
marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
Well, I have currently on the back burner a space opera whose
timeline includes (for some senses of "includes") The Interregnum,
a several-centuries period during which technology suffered a
hit, there was no space travel, and a lot of things that happened
before it have become the stuff of myth and legend. This
includes _inter alia_ how Mars and Venus were terraformed.
I did this so that I could have a desertish Mars and a swampish
Venus in my space opera, as all true space operas ought to have.
I may even take it off the back burner someday.
Have you tried S M Stirling's faux-Burroughs/Kline books?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People [For Venus]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings
For Mars]

You might like them, but in authoress mode, you might want
to avoid, lest ye be influenced.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-23 20:44:04 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Are there any future histories where the timeline is
Post by Jack Bohn
marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
Well, I have currently on the back burner a space opera whose
timeline includes (for some senses of "includes") The Interregnum,
a several-centuries period during which technology suffered a
hit, there was no space travel, and a lot of things that happened
before it have become the stuff of myth and legend. This
includes _inter alia_ how Mars and Venus were terraformed.
I did this so that I could have a desertish Mars and a swampish
Venus in my space opera, as all true space operas ought to have.
I may even take it off the back burner someday.
Have you tried S M Stirling's faux-Burroughs/Kline books?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People [For Venus]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings
For Mars]
You might like them, but in authoress mode, you might want
to avoid, lest ye be influenced.
Or distracted. I am supposed to be working on something else.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jack Bohn
2019-05-23 22:21:09 UTC
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But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, 
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the 
19-oughts." 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real 
difference, but a very small one. 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way (has anyone transposed The Music Man to sf? "Welcome out Io way, now go home...") Our capital is Clombus, Hiyo; two syllbols is enough for any word, more would be ostentatious.
--
-Jack
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-23 23:35:21 UTC
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Post by Jack Bohn
 
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, 
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the 
19-oughts." 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real 
difference, but a very small one. 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different!
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way
But did you in 1914 or so?

(has anyone
Post by Jack Bohn
transposed The Music Man to sf? "Welcome out Io way, now go home...")
Our capital is Clombus, Hiyo; two syllbols is enough for any word, more
would be ostentatious.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jack Bohn
2019-05-24 01:04:25 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the  
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814!
--
-Jack
Dimensional Traveler
2019-05-24 03:48:37 UTC
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Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different!
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814!
What did the people living there in 1614 call it?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jack Bohn
2019-05-24 04:47:53 UTC
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Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like you.  I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814! 
What did the people living there in 1614 call it? 
Those living along [a stretch of] the River called *it* something close enough to "Ohio" that it was written down that way when writing came along. Up in my neck of the woods, well, it was a neck of the Great Black Swamp, their words for that area were probably unprintable!
--
-Jack
Kevrob
2019-05-24 04:11:55 UTC
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Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the  
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.

* Spuds?

https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_album.html

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2019-05-24 11:08:13 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the  
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_album.html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Kevrob
2019-05-24 17:07:37 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Oklahoma State? Oregon State? :)

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Dimensional Traveler
2019-05-24 18:28:28 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Oklahoma State? Oregon State? :)
Oz State University.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2019-05-24 21:58:48 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Oklahoma State? Oregon State? :)
THE Ohio State University (there can be only one, or so it says on the
label).
Kevrob
2019-05-24 22:12:10 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Oklahoma State? Oregon State? :)
THE Ohio State University (there can be only one, or so it says on the
label).*
The _older_ Ohio University is also a state university.
It doesn't insist on the definite article, though.

* Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College, as was.

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2019-05-24 22:27:22 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Oklahoma State? Oregon State? :)
THE Ohio State University (there can be only one, or so it says on the
label).*
The _older_ Ohio University is also a state university.
It doesn't insist on the definite article, though.
* Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College, as was.
That the definite article is undeserved was (and probably still is)
kind of a running joke among OSU students and alumni.
Robert Woodward
2019-05-24 17:23:50 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the  
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state
Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like
you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so
back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_album
.html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
But they have a marching band that makes a big production out of writing
"Ohio" and dotting the "i".
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Kevrob
2019-05-24 17:40:57 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the  
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state
Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like
you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so
back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_album
.html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
But they have a marching band that makes a big production out of writing
"Ohio" and dotting the "i".
It's so kind of them to spell out the name of their senior
institution in Athens. :)

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-24 18:35:40 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J Heydt wrote: 
 
In article
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,  
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of
"Ohio in the  
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
19-oughts."  
 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.  
 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different! 
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state
Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like
you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so
back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_album
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
.html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
But they have a marching band that makes a big production out of writing
"Ohio" and dotting the "i".
It's so kind of them to spell out the name of their senior
institution in Athens. :)
Athens, Georgia, or Athens, Greece?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Woodward
2019-05-25 04:33:07 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
In article
Dorothy J Heydt wrote:A
A
In article
Post by Jack Bohn
A A
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and
Rome,A A
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. A There is no genre of
"Ohio in theA A
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Jack Bohn
19-oughts."A A
A
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A A realA A
difference, but a very small one.A A
A
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely
different!A
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-wayA
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or state
Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from California like
you. I'm now going to insist everything is as I've known it forever, so
back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_debut_albu
m
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
.html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
But they have a marching band that makes a big production out of writing
"Ohio" and dotting the "i".
It's so kind of them to spell out the name of their senior
institution in Athens. :)
Athens, Georgia, or Athens, Greece?
Athens, Ohio (home of Ohio University which, IIRC, is the oldest USA
institution of higher learning west of the Appalachians).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Cryptoengineer
2019-05-24 17:54:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jack Bohn
In article
Dorothy J Heydt wrote:   
In article
Post by Jack Bohn
  
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and
Rome,   Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre
of "Ohio in the   19-oughts."    
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real  
difference, but a very small one.    
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely
different!  For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way 
But did you in 1914 or so?
Sorry I was unclear, I'm a Buckeye, not a Hawkeye, we pronounce or
state Hiya, or carefully as O-Hi-O if talking to a ferner from
California like you. I'm now going to insist everything is as
I've known it forever, so back to 1914, and even 1814!
I used to hear "uh-hi-uh" from college classmates who came
from places like Canton. Spuds* from Cleveland and Akron
wouldn't say that, though.
* Spuds?
https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/2018/08/devo_released_its_deb
ut_album .html
I went to OSU for two years and never heard "Hiya" unless it was
followed by "howyadoin"?
But they have a marching band that makes a big production out of
writing "Ohio" and dotting the "i".
Yes indeed, they do (SFW):



pt
Richard Hershberger
2019-05-24 15:03:59 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
 
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, 
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the 
19-oughts." 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real 
difference, but a very small one. 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different!
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way
But did you in 1914 or so?
In unrelated news, in 1914 "Frisco" was a perfectly cromulent local nickname for San Francisco. It was later that the denizens of the city decided it was unforgivable.

Richard R. Hershberger
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-24 18:42:12 UTC
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Post by Richard Hershberger
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
 
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, 
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the 
19-oughts." 
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa.  A real 
difference, but a very small one. 
Written like a Californian! They're... they're completely different!
For one thing, we don't pronounce our state I-O-way
But did you in 1914 or so?
In unrelated news, in 1914 "Frisco" was a perfectly cromulent local
nickname for San Francisco. It was later that the denizens of the city
decided it was unforgivable.
I'm not going to try to research it, but now you've got me
wondering whether it was Herb Caen who decided the nickname was
unforgivable.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
t***@gmail.com
2019-05-24 18:15:13 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Unless you're talking about "4 letters, 3 syllables", that's way way wrong.
Iowa and Ohio are very different.

Tony
Scott Lurndal
2019-05-24 19:50:14 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Unless you're talking about "4 letters, 3 syllables", that's way way wrong.
Iowa and Ohio are very different.
Not, apparently, to anyone west of the rockies.....
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-24 20:57:55 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Unless you're talking about "4 letters, 3 syllables", that's way way wrong.
Iowa and Ohio are very different.
Not, apparently, to anyone west of the rockies.....
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.

Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Scott Lurndal
2019-05-24 22:05:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Unless you're talking about "4 letters, 3 syllables", that's way way wrong.
Iowa and Ohio are very different.
Not, apparently, to anyone west of the rockies.....
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
One's the hawkeye state, the other is the buckeye state. One is
west of the mighty muddy, one is east of it. One is known for
the magnitude of its annual corn (maize) harvest, the other is known for
a basketball team that got lucky in 2016.
Titus G
2019-05-25 00:22:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."
Well, there's _The Music Man_, but that's in Iowa. A real
difference, but a very small one.
Unless you're talking about "4 letters, 3 syllables", that's way way wrong.
Iowa and Ohio are very different.
Not, apparently, to anyone west of the rockies.....
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
One's the hawkeye state, the other is the buckeye state. One is
west of the mighty muddy, one is east of it. One is known for
the magnitude of its annual corn (maize) harvest, the other is known for
a basketball team that got lucky in 2016.
.
Without looking at a map, I am none the wiser. Did Neil Young write
about Iowa?
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-25 00:47:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
One's the hawkeye state, the other is the buckeye state.
Googling "hawkeye" gave me lots of references to Marvel Comics.
Googling "hawkeye state" yielded, "Two Iowa promoters from
Burlington are believed to have popularized the name," without
defining what a hawkeye is, if not part of a hawk.

Now, we have buckeyes in California, unless you're talking about
a different species.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesculus_californica

The local Native Americans would eat the nuts when they had to
(as, when acorns were scarce), but it had to be boiled and
leached to get rid of toxins. The local-to-the-Bay_Area tribe,
the Ohlone, used to have a buckeye festival every fall, when they
would leach the nuts and grind the results. They did this every
year whether the acorns failed or not, so they wouldn't forget
*how to.*
Post by Scott Lurndal
One is
west of the mighty muddy, one is east of it.
The few bits of terrain I saw on both sides of the river, when we
saw it in 1976, looked remarkably similar.
Post by Scott Lurndal
One is known for
the magnitude of its annual corn (maize) harvest, the other is known for
a basketball team that got lucky in 2016.
Yes, but which is which?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2019-05-25 03:49:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
One's the hawkeye state, the other is the buckeye state.
Googling "hawkeye" gave me lots of references to Marvel Comics.
Googling "hawkeye state" yielded, "Two Iowa promoters from
Burlington are believed to have popularized the name," without
defining what a hawkeye is, if not part of a hawk.
"Hawkeye" is generally an indicator of extraordinary visual acuity. I
don't know if it's use in James Fenimore Cooper's _Leatherstocking
Tales_ was original or if it just reflected existing common usage.
However that usage was still at least somewhat commonplace in the
'50s--my mother had a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera.

Wiki suggests that the use in Iowa was related to a friendship between
the aforementioned two promoters and one Chief Black Hawk. This is
not entirely implausible in that around that time a book which
purported to be his autobiography was apparently wildly popular--this
is said to be the first autobiography of a Native American to be
published. How they got from Black Hawk to Hawkeye is not
clear--purhaps they threw in a bit of Cooper as well, or perhaps Black
Hawk was noted for sharp vision.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Now, we have buckeyes in California, unless you're talking about
a different species.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesculus_californica
The local Native Americans would eat the nuts when they had to
(as, when acorns were scarce), but it had to be boiled and
leached to get rid of toxins. The local-to-the-Bay_Area tribe,
the Ohlone, used to have a buckeye festival every fall, when they
would leach the nuts and grind the results. They did this every
year whether the acorns failed or not, so they wouldn't forget
*how to.*
Post by Scott Lurndal
One is
west of the mighty muddy, one is east of it.
The few bits of terrain I saw on both sides of the river, when we
saw it in 1976, looked remarkably similar.
Post by Scott Lurndal
One is known for
the magnitude of its annual corn (maize) harvest, the other is known for
a basketball team that got lucky in 2016.
Yes, but which is which?
Kevrob
2019-05-25 04:24:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
One's the hawkeye state, the other is the buckeye state.
Googling "hawkeye" gave me lots of references to Marvel Comics.
Googling "hawkeye state" yielded, "Two Iowa promoters from
Burlington are believed to have popularized the name," without
defining what a hawkeye is, if not part of a hawk.
Marvel's "Hawkeye the Marksman," Clint Barton, was given an Iowa
birthplace years after his debut, by, IMS, Roy Thomas. Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo. Roy
the Boy* even had Clint commenting favorably while he and several
other Assemblers relaxed between missions at Avengers Mansion by
watching the BBC "Last of The Mohicans" series aired by PBS.
(1972, part of Masterpiece Theatre.)

Bumpo was a crack shot with the long rifle, but he probably knew
his way around a bow.

*I no longer own the issue. It could have been published months
after the final episode aired on PBS.

Kevin R
David Goldfarb
2019-05-30 03:55:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
--
David Goldfarb |"For some reason, most of my clearest memories
***@gmail.com |from my youth are of various traumas."
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | -- James Nicoll
Kevrob
2019-05-30 12:23:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.

Kevin R
Juho Julkunen
2019-05-30 15:57:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
--
Juho Julkunen
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-30 16:14:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
Well, but it may have been more acceptable in the early
nineteenth century (and set in the early eighteenth century) than
they are now.

I haven't read Cooper, but ISTR reading that the worst thing
about his *plotting*, as distinguished from his nomenclature, is
his too-frequent use of the snap of a stepped-upon twig as a
signal for action.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Juho Julkunen
2019-05-30 23:09:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
Well, but it may have been more acceptable in the early
nineteenth century (and set in the early eighteenth century) than
they are now.
I haven't read Cooper, but ISTR reading that the worst thing
about his *plotting*, as distinguished from his nomenclature, is
his too-frequent use of the snap of a stepped-upon twig as a
signal for action.
I believe Mark Twain touched upon that, too, in his essay "Fenimore
Cooper's Literary Offenses."
--
Juho Julkunen
D B Davis
2019-06-05 04:18:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
Well, but it may have been more acceptable in the early
nineteenth century (and set in the early eighteenth century) than
they are now.
I haven't read Cooper, but ISTR reading that the worst thing
about his *plotting*, as distinguished from his nomenclature, is
his too-frequent use of the snap of a stepped-upon twig as a
signal for action.
I believe Mark Twain touched upon that, too, in his essay "Fenimore
Cooper's Literary Offenses."
_Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?_ (Albee) says a thing or two about
finger & dragon snaps.

George (Flourishing the flowers). SNAP WENT THE DRAGONS!! (Nick and
Martha laugh weakly) Hunh? Here we go round the mulberry bush,
Hunh?
Nick (Tenderly, to Martha). Thank you.
Martha. Skip it.
George (Loud). I said, here we go round the mulberry bush!
Martha (Impatiently). Yeah, yeah, we know; snap go the dragons.
George (Taking a snapdragon, throwing it, spear-like, stem-first
at Martha). SNAP!
Martha. Don't, George!
Nick. Don't do that.
George. Shut up, stud.
Nick. I'm not a stud.
George (Throws one at Nick). SNAP! Then you're a houseboy. Which is
it? Which are you? Hunh? Make up your mind. Either way. ...
(Throws another at him) SNAP! ... you disgust me.
Martha. Does it matter to you, George?
George (Throws one at her). SNAP! No, actually it doesn't. Either
... way I've had it.
Martha. Stop throwing those damn things at me!
George. Either way. (Throws another at her.) SNAP!
Nick (To Martha). Do you want me to ... do something to him?
Martha. You leave him alone!
George. If you're a houseboy, baby, you can pick up after me; if
you're a stud, you can go protect your plow.



Thank you,
--
Don
Moriarty
2019-05-30 21:35:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
It's no worse than Martin Chuzzlewit, Ebeneezer Scrooge or Philip Pirrip. And now I've written that I wonder if Cooper was influenced by Dickens?

-Moriarty
Juho Julkunen
2019-06-01 15:36:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
It's no worse than Martin Chuzzlewit, Ebeneezer Scrooge or Philip Pirrip. And now I've written that I wonder if Cooper was influenced by Dickens?
Ebenezer Scrooge and Philip Pirrip are perfectly good names, well
suited to purpose.

Perhaps the same is true of Chuzzlewit; I have not read about his
adventures.
--
Juho Julkunen
J. Clarke
2019-06-01 16:54:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 1 Jun 2019 18:36:46 +0300, Juho Julkunen
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Moriarty
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Kevrob
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Kevrob
Stan Lee
took the archer's nom de guerre from Cooper's Natty Bumpo.
Correcting to be polite: Bumppo.
Thank you. Brain and/or fingers let me down.
I feel the fault lies with Mr. Cooper for thinking that Natty Bumppo is
an acceptable name for a protagonist.
It's no worse than Martin Chuzzlewit, Ebeneezer Scrooge or Philip Pirrip. And now I've written that I wonder if Cooper was influenced by Dickens?
Ebenezer Scrooge and Philip Pirrip are perfectly good names, well
suited to purpose.
Perhaps the same is true of Chuzzlewit; I have not read about his
adventures.
A little research suggests that there are several surnames that
approximate "Bumppo". "Bumpus" seems the most common.
David DeLaney
2019-05-25 14:14:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.

Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.

The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.

Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.

Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.

Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.

We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.

Dave, both are considered flyover states by coastal folks
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-05-25 18:27:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.
Ah. I wonder how they will be affected when California's goes to
Mardh?
Post by David DeLaney
Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.
Something that I would not notice even if I were standing among
them.
Post by David DeLaney
The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.
Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.
Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.
Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.
We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.
Okay, most of those are differences I would not notice, but I'll
take your word for them.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
D B Davis
2019-05-28 13:47:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.
Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.
The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.
Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.
Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.
Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.
We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.
Dave, both are considered flyover states by coastal folks
When James "Smiling Cobra" Aubrey said "The American public is something
I fly over." he may have been talking about Ohio, which is a popular
culture bellwether. Those who would be President need Ohio, as does any
other product that wants to be a hit.
It's my understanding that George Washington and about two thirds of
the founding fathers were heavily invested in Ohio real estate. After
King George III issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763 it meant war.
Ohio's also the home of the Old Right (Taft /not/ Eisenhower), the
Wright Brothers, the Goodyear Tire company, the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
immortalized in song, and Holy Toledo.
One more thing. Iowa has the Iowa River and Ohio has the Ohio River.

ObSF: The late Harlan Ellison hailed from Ohio.



Thank you,
--
Don
Robert Woodward
2019-05-28 17:08:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.
Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.
The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.
Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.
Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.
Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.
We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.
Dave, both are considered flyover states by coastal folks
When James "Smiling Cobra" Aubrey said "The American public is something
I fly over." he may have been talking about Ohio, which is a popular
culture bellwether. Those who would be President need Ohio, as does any
other product that wants to be a hit.
Only Republicans need to carry Ohio to become President. Democrats have
been elected President without carrying Ohio (however, the last was
Kennedy in 1960).
Post by D B Davis
It's my understanding that George Washington and about two thirds of
the founding fathers were heavily invested in Ohio real estate. After
King George III issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763 it meant war.
Ohio's also the home of the Old Right (Taft /not/ Eisenhower), the
Wright Brothers, the Goodyear Tire company, the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
immortalized in song, and Holy Toledo.
One more thing. Iowa has the Iowa River and Ohio has the Ohio River.
Actually, Ohio doesn't have the Ohio River. The state's southern
boundary is the north bank of the Ohio River.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Kevrob
2019-05-28 17:23:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by D B Davis
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.
Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.
The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.
Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.
Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.
Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.
We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.
Dave, both are considered flyover states by coastal folks
When James "Smiling Cobra" Aubrey said "The American public is something
I fly over." he may have been talking about Ohio, which is a popular
culture bellwether. Those who would be President need Ohio, as does any
other product that wants to be a hit.
Only Republicans need to carry Ohio to become President. Democrats have
been elected President without carrying Ohio (however, the last was
Kennedy in 1960).
Post by D B Davis
It's my understanding that George Washington and about two thirds of
the founding fathers were heavily invested in Ohio real estate. After
King George III issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763 it meant war.
Ohio's also the home of the Old Right (Taft /not/ Eisenhower), the
Wright Brothers, the Goodyear Tire company, the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
immortalized in song, and Holy Toledo.
One more thing. Iowa has the Iowa River and Ohio has the Ohio River.
Actually, Ohio doesn't have the Ohio River. The state's southern
boundary is the north bank of the Ohio River.
Not the bank, but the low-waterline on the northern side.
It's only 100-500 feet, but it's something.


https://www.nytimes.com/1981/10/21/us/kentucky-indiana-and-ohio-end-river-boundary-dispute.html

Kevin R
Kevrob
2019-05-28 17:18:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
For those of us west of the Rockies, the difference is not
apparent from where we stand.
Educate me: what are some of the significant differences between
Iowa and Ohio?
Presidential primaries converge on the former far earlier than on the latter.
Different varieties of cows and corn cover each.
The Big River next to Iowa runs down its east and west side, whereas Ohio's
runs backwards along its south.
Ohio has a North Shore and is next to a Great Lake and original colonies; Iowa
is landlocked and at the edge of the West.
Ohio has or abuts mountains (the Appalachians); not Iowa.
Ohio has nearly four times as many people as Iowa, and correspondingly more
vageuly-rememberable cities for folks not from there.
We had to buy Iowa. We acquired Ohio by exploring westward over it, basically.
Dave, both are considered flyover states by coastal folks
When James "Smiling Cobra" Aubrey said....
Jack Kirby "borrowed" that nickname for the head of
"Galaxy Broadcasting," which took over The Daily Planet
in SUPERMAN in the early 70s.

https://kirbymuseum.org/blogs/365fourth/2010/10/04/day-three-morgan-edge-galaxy-broadcasting/
.................................."The American public is something
I fly over." he may have been talking about Ohio, which is a popular
culture bellwether. Those who would be President need Ohio, as does any
other product that wants to be a hit.
It's my understanding that George Washington and about two thirds of
the founding fathers were heavily invested in Ohio real estate. After
King George III issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763 it meant war.
Ohio's also the home of the Old Right (Taft /not/ Eisenhower), the
Wright Brothers, the Goodyear Tire company, the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
immortalized in song, and Holy Toledo.
One more thing. Iowa has the Iowa River and Ohio has the Ohio River.
ObSF: The late Harlan Ellison hailed from Ohio.
Siegel and Shuster were from Cleveland, Joe by way of Toronto.

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Joy Beeson
2019-05-29 01:37:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
One more thing. Iowa has the Iowa River and Ohio has the Ohio River.
It also has a small loop of the Wabash.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
Robert Carnegie
2019-05-24 08:35:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
One other helpful feature of explainxkcd.com is crosslinks to comics on similar thoughts.
https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/2152:_Westerns
Is about Westerns as a genre lasting longer than the Wild West period. There's a link to a post about the question whether the length of all the movies about World War II adds up to more time than the war years. This can be extended up and down. The Grandeur That Was Rome has been talked about since folks realized Rome was grander than what was around them. The Kennedy assassination footage takes longer to view than the event; documentaries and docudramas stretches the definition: if they cover preparations and root causes, shouldn't our measure of the Real Time of the event, too?
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the 19-oughts." Are there any future histories where the timeline is marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
--
-Jack
As opposed to _Interesting Times_ (Terry Pratchett)...

His Discworld doesn't quite have a timeline; on the
contrary, time is abused and borrowed and mutilated
until in _Night Watch_, city policeman Sam Vimes
ends up being the wise mentor of his younger self,
and the History Monks have to get involved.

Not-meanwhile (obviously), in his _Lords and Ladies_,
tiny kingdom Lancre is saved partly by its queen being
inspired by the memory of an entirely fictitious
warlike predecessor, whose inventor had thoughtfully
manufactured the lady's battle armour as well -
believing the actual history to be overall a bit
unsatisfactory.
David Johnston
2019-05-24 15:58:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
One other helpful feature of explainxkcd.com is crosslinks to comics on similar thoughts.
https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/2152:_Westerns
Is about Westerns as a genre lasting longer than the Wild West period. There's a link to a post about the question whether the length of all the movies about World War II adds up to more time than the war years. This can be extended up and down. The Grandeur That Was Rome has been talked about since folks realized Rome was grander than what was around them. The Kennedy assassination footage takes longer to view than the event; documentaries and docudramas stretches the definition: if they cover preparations and root causes, shouldn't our measure of the Real Time of the event, too?
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome, Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII. There is no genre of "Ohio in the 19-oughts." Are there any future histories where the timeline is marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
The problem with periods of history too dull to talk about is that
people don't talk about them. Simak tends to have a lot of history
that's too dull to talk about. We just check in after humanity has
literally died of boredom. Star Trek the Next Generation starts right
after such a period, decades in which nothing interesting happened and
humanity has become so insufferably smug about how they've solved all
the problems and eliminated all danger that's it's a point of
ideological faith that the Federation doesn't have or need a military
and to prove it they've loaded their most heavily armed ship with a
bunch of civilian passengers, including very young children.

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David Johnston
2019-05-24 18:02:45 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Jack Bohn
One other helpful feature of explainxkcd.com is crosslinks to comics on similar thoughts.
  https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/2152:_Westerns
Is about Westerns as a genre lasting longer than the Wild West
period.  There's a link to a post about the question whether the
length of all the movies about World War II adds up to more time than
the war years.  This can be extended up and down.  The Grandeur That
Was Rome has been talked about since folks realized Rome was grander
than what was around them.  The Kennedy assassination footage takes
longer to view than the event; documentaries and docudramas stretches
the definition: if they cover preparations and root causes, shouldn't
our measure of the Real Time of the event, too?
But back to the poplit Four Ages of Man: Ancient Egypt and Rome,
Camelot, the Wild West, and WWII.  There is no genre of "Ohio in the
19-oughts."  Are there any future histories where the timeline is
marked, or characters complain about eras too dull to talk about?
The problem with periods of history too dull to talk about is that
people don't talk about them.  Simak tends to have a lot of history
that's too dull to talk about.  We just check in after humanity has
literally died of boredom.  Star Trek the Next Generation starts right
after such a period, decades in which nothing interesting happened and
humanity has become so insufferably smug about how they've solved all
the problems and eliminated all danger that's it's a point of
ideological faith that the Federation doesn't have or need a military
and to prove it they've loaded their most heavily armed ship with a
bunch of civilian passengers, including very young children.
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Now that I think about it, The End of Eternity is all about an
organization dedicated to making history too dull to talk about.
Jack Bohn
2019-05-24 23:52:46 UTC
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I went up to Deep Stash for my _Tales of Known Space_ where the repurposed "Safe at Any Speed" suggests the Teela Brown gene will make further stories difficult.

Ballantine/Del Rey dd a neat thing with a timeline in their series books, balancing the broad sweep of time vs. clumps of character-based stories. _The Best of Cordwainer Smith_, has one, too, and at least one other I don't recall and didn't have time to dig for. The Smith shows a two thousand year gap in stories while stabilizing the utopia, but a story or two could have fallen in that gap if he'd written more. Niven had the whole of the 2500s empty of stories of the Man-Kzin Wars because he didn't feel qualified to say more than "They always attacked before they were ready."
--
-Jack
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