Discussion:
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
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Lynn McGuire
2021-05-14 06:03:54 UTC
Permalink
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/

I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".

The read books are "The Honor of the Queen", "Broken Angels", "Caliban’s
War", "The Warrior’s Apprentice", "A Deepness in the Sky", "Startide
Rising", "Green Mars", "To Say Nothing of the Dog", and "2010: Odyssey Two".

In reading order, the wonderful "Shards of Honor" is followed by the
marvelous "Barrayar". One must not miss Cordelia's shopping trip.

https://www.amazon.com/Barrayar-Vorkosigan-Saga-McMaster-Bujold/dp/1476781117/

Lynn
Moriarty
2021-05-14 11:18:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I absolutely loved Ready Player One. A word of warning: Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.

-Moriarty
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-14 19:18:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I absolutely loved Ready Player One. A word of warning: Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
-Moriarty
Wow, that is a very strong derecommendation. I am still going to read
it eventually.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-15 01:00:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I absolutely loved Ready Player One. A word of warning: Do not, not,
NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming pile of horseshit with no
redeeming features.
-Moriarty
Wow, that is a very strong derecommendation.  I am still going to read
it eventually.
Lynn
In fact, that is quite the challenge so I may read it next. I am
reading a 600 page trade paperback at the moment that is quite the
challenge also. It is a novel of deceit, deception, and betrayal. In
other words, a typical space opera story.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-15 02:23:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I absolutely loved Ready Player One. A word of warning: Do not, not,
NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming pile of horseshit with no
redeeming features.
-Moriarty
Wow, that is a very strong derecommendation.  I am still going to read
it eventually.
Lynn
In fact, that is quite the challenge so I may read it next.  I am
reading a 600 page trade paperback at the moment that is quite the
challenge also.  It is a novel of deceit, deception, and betrayal.  In
other words, a typical space opera story.
Lynn
I was wrong, I do not have "Ready Player Two" yet. It is only available
in hardback and large text trade paperback. I will continue to wait for
the regular trade paperback as my eyes are not bad enough, yet.
https://www.amazon.com/Ready-Player-Two-Ernest-Cline/dp/1524761338/

Lynn
Moriarty
2021-05-15 12:24:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I absolutely loved Ready Player One. A word of warning: Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
-Moriarty
Wow, that is a very strong derecommendation. I am still going to read
it eventually.
Lynn
Well, you have been warned. I look forward to your review.

-Moriarty
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-15 11:07:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming
pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
_Ready Player One_ did get reviews very similar to that.
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-17 19:43:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming
pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
_Ready Player One_ did get reviews very similar to that.
Basically, RP1 came down to, did you love the 1980s or not ? RP2 might
be the same way.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-18 00:23:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming
pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
_Ready Player One_ did get reviews very similar to that.
Basically, RP1 came down to, did you love the 1980s or not ? RP2 might
be the same way.
Dear me. In the 1980s I was raising two young children. I love
my daughter and my son; I did not love the 1980s.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2021-05-18 07:28:29 UTC
Permalink
[snip]
Basically, RP1 [Ready Player One] came down to, did you love the 1980s
or not ? RP2 might be the same way.
Dear me. In the 1980s I was raising two young children. I love
my daughter and my son; I did not love the 1980s.
--
I liked the 80s: New Wave music and the tail end of 70s punk; I finished
my BA and had jobs I liked, even if they didn't pay well; I had both a fannish
and non-fannish social life; traveled a bit; lived in "slan shack" apartments,
then by myself; had a few romances, but none that "took"; got a driver's
license and a couple of cars; and played video games _very occasionally_
in arcades, taverns and other public places. What I didn't do was get a
gaming console or a computer that would play games. I used computers
at school and at work, but waited until the late 90s to get my own. I did
start posting to USENET via Dejanews before I bought a PC, using the
terminals set up "internet cafe"-style at a bagel shop near my house,
or the library.

If I had the 80s to live over again, I might do them differently,
for career reasons, if nothing else, but they hold some good
memories. Granted, I was under 30 for the 1st half. I was even
able to play full-court basketball one night a week at a church's
gym we rented on Wednesday nights and be able to walk the next
morning. I wasn't any good, mind you, but it improved my wind.
--
Kevin R
Paul S Person
2021-05-18 17:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Moriarty
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
Do not, not, NOT read Ready Player Two. It's a steaming
pile of horseshit with no redeeming features.
_Ready Player One_ did get reviews very similar to that.
Basically, RP1 came down to, did you love the 1980s or not ? RP2 might
be the same way.
Dear me. In the 1980s I was raising two young children. I love
my daughter and my son; I did not love the 1980s.
RP1 the movie had enough visual references, most of which mimicked
other movies, to put me completely off the film -- all they did is
remind me /how much better/ the references looked and acted in the
original. The movie itself is definitely a YA film about Young Man vs
Evil Corporation, and plays out pretty much as you might expect.

If the visual references had been replaced with something original, I
might have liked it a little better. Not much, perhaps, but a little.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
a***@yahoo.com
2021-05-15 16:00:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
The read books are "The Honor of the Queen", "Broken Angels", "Caliban’s
War", "The Warrior’s Apprentice", "A Deepness in the Sky", "Startide
Rising", "Green Mars", "To Say Nothing of the Dog", and "2010: Odyssey Two".
In reading order, the wonderful "Shards of Honor" is followed by the
marvelous "Barrayar". One must not miss Cordelia's shopping trip.
https://www.amazon.com/Barrayar-Vorkosigan-Saga-McMaster-Bujold/dp/1476781117/
Lynn
I read "Mona Lisa Overdrive", but not "Count Zero". For some reason, I never got through Neuromancer. When I mentioned that to a clerk at a SF bookstore, he said that Neuromancer was like "On the Road" and then compared another novel (In his view much better) of Kerouac's to Mona Lisa Overdrive. I never finished "On the Road", either.
Michael F. Stemper
2021-05-15 16:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I read "Mona Lisa Overdrive", but not "Count Zero". For some reason, I never got through Neuromancer.
I managed to get through _Neuromancer_ and, a year later, _Mona Lisa
Overdrive_. I sold both, but it took a few years before Uncle Hugo's
would accept them; apparently there was a surfeit of copies available.
Post by a***@yahoo.com
When I mentioned that to a clerk at a SF bookstore, he said that Neuromancer was like "On the Road" and then compared another novel (In his view much better) of Kerouac's to Mona Lisa Overdrive. I never finished "On the Road", either.
In the mid-1980s, I borrowed _On the Road_ from a friend. It took
me weeks to slog through it. Then, in 2007, my sister and her husband
gave me a copy for Christmas.

However, this was the edition referred to (at least by Viking) as "The
Original Scroll". It seems that Kerouac wrote it in one continuous
spew of typing on a ginormous roll of butcher paper, with no
frivolities such as chapters, section breaks, or even paragraphs. This
edition matched that.

Don't know why it made a difference, but this time, I was able to read
the whole thing in an afternoon.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Paul S Person
2021-05-16 16:37:17 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:28:29 -0500, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I read "Mona Lisa Overdrive", but not "Count Zero". For some reason, I never got through Neuromancer.
I managed to get through _Neuromancer_ and, a year later, _Mona Lisa
Overdrive_. I sold both, but it took a few years before Uncle Hugo's
would accept them; apparently there was a surfeit of copies available.
Post by a***@yahoo.com
When I mentioned that to a clerk at a SF bookstore, he said that Neuromancer was like "On the Road" and then compared another novel (In his view much better) of Kerouac's to Mona Lisa Overdrive. I never finished "On the Road", either.
In the mid-1980s, I borrowed _On the Road_ from a friend. It took
me weeks to slog through it. Then, in 2007, my sister and her husband
gave me a copy for Christmas.
However, this was the edition referred to (at least by Viking) as "The
Original Scroll". It seems that Kerouac wrote it in one continuous
spew of typing on a ginormous roll of butcher paper, with no
frivolities such as chapters, section breaks, or even paragraphs. This
edition matched that.
An ancient tradition.

No, really.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Don't know why it made a difference, but this time, I was able to read
the whole thing in an afternoon.
Well, you weren't distracted by the frivolities.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Andrew McDowell
2021-05-16 19:55:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Lynn McGuire
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I read "Mona Lisa Overdrive", but not "Count Zero". For some reason, I never got through Neuromancer.
I managed to get through _Neuromancer_ and, a year later, _Mona Lisa
Overdrive_. I sold both, but it took a few years before Uncle Hugo's
would accept them; apparently there was a surfeit of copies available.
When I mentioned that to a clerk at a SF bookstore, he said that Neuromancer was like "On the Road" and then compared another novel (In his view much better) of Kerouac's to Mona Lisa Overdrive. I never finished "On the Road", either.
In the mid-1980s, I borrowed _On the Road_ from a friend. It took
me weeks to slog through it. Then, in 2007, my sister and her husband
gave me a copy for Christmas.
However, this was the edition referred to (at least by Viking) as "The
Original Scroll". It seems that Kerouac wrote it in one continuous
spew of typing on a ginormous roll of butcher paper, with no
frivolities such as chapters, section breaks, or even paragraphs. This
edition matched that.
Don't know why it made a difference, but this time, I was able to read
the whole thing in an afternoon.
--
Michael F. Stemper
From the Wikipedia entry on Terry Pratchett

Pratchett had a tendency to avoid using chapters, arguing in a Book Sense interview that "life does not happen in regular chapters, nor do movies, and Homer did not write in chapters", adding "I'm blessed if I know what function they serve in books for adults."[155] However, there were exceptions; Going Postal and Making Money and several of his books for younger readers are divided into chapters.[156] Pratchett offered explanations for his sporadic use of chapters; in the young adult titles, he said that he must use chapters because '[his] editor screams until [he] does', but otherwise felt that they were an unnecessary 'stopping point' that got in the way of the narrative.

When I am struggling, the end of the chapter gives me something to aim for, so on balance I think they urge me forwards. When immersed in Pratchett, it is possible that the lack of chapter boundaries lulls me into reading for longer than I should.
Paul S Person
2021-05-17 17:13:14 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 16 May 2021 15:57:28 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Andrew McDowell
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Lynn McGuire
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
I read "Mona Lisa Overdrive", but not "Count Zero". For some reason, I never got through Neuromancer.
I managed to get through _Neuromancer_ and, a year later, _Mona Lisa
Overdrive_. I sold both, but it took a few years before Uncle Hugo's
would accept them; apparently there was a surfeit of copies available.
When I mentioned that to a clerk at a SF bookstore, he said that Neuromancer was like "On the Road" and then compared another novel (In his view much better) of Kerouac's to Mona Lisa Overdrive. I never finished "On the Road", either.
In the mid-1980s, I borrowed _On the Road_ from a friend. It took
me weeks to slog through it. Then, in 2007, my sister and her husband
gave me a copy for Christmas.
However, this was the edition referred to (at least by Viking) as "The
Original Scroll". It seems that Kerouac wrote it in one continuous
spew of typing on a ginormous roll of butcher paper, with no
frivolities such as chapters, section breaks, or even paragraphs. This
edition matched that.
Don't know why it made a difference, but this time, I was able to read
the whole thing in an afternoon.
--
Michael F. Stemper
From the Wikipedia entry on Terry Pratchett
Pratchett had a tendency to avoid using chapters, arguing in a Book Sense interview that "life does not happen in regular chapters, nor do movies, and Homer did not write in chapters", adding "I'm blessed if I know what function they serve in books for adults."[155] However, there were exceptions; Going Postal and Making Money and several of his books for younger readers are divided into chapters.[156] Pratchett offered explanations for his sporadic use of chapters; in the young adult titles, he said that he must use chapters because '[his] editor screams until [he] does', but otherwise felt that they were an unnecessary 'stopping point' that got in the way of the narrative.
Homer didn't /write/ anything. The poems were written down after a few
centuries of oral tradition, IIRC.

And they /were/ divided into chapters: each chapter was sung on one
night. But perhaps he meant that each of those parts, called "books",
was not divided into chapters. Well, how much poetry is?

You have to remember that travelling bards sung them -- and were fed
while they were doing so. So stringing it out over several nights was
to their advantage.

Yes, they literally sang for their supper!
Post by Andrew McDowell
When I am struggling, the end of the chapter gives me something to aim for, so on balance I think they urge me forwards. When immersed in Pratchett, it is possible that the lack of chapter boundaries lulls me into reading for longer than I should.
He does line breaks between scenes; super-paragraphs,
but probably there's another name for it.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Default User
2021-05-20 06:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
https://best-sci-fi-books.com/the-best-science-fiction-book-sequels/
I have read 9 of the 21. I have two of the other in my SBR, "Ready
Player Two" and "Count Zero".
The read books are "The Honor of the Queen", "Broken Angels",
"Caliban’s War", "The Warrior’s Apprentice", "A Deepness in the Sky",
"Startide Rising", "Green Mars", "To Say Nothing of the Dog", and
"2010: Odyssey Two".
That's right, you haven't read the Murderbot books. I was a little
surprised at that, as it seemed like they might be to your taste from
what I recall.

I got a bit of a late start on them because I misunderstood what they
were about until I saw one on some other list.


Brian
Default User
2021-05-20 06:06:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"The Best Science Fiction Book Sequels" by Dan Livingston
I have read the following:

Artificial Condition by Martha Wells – 2018
A Deepness in the Sky by Vernor Vinge – 1999
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams – 1980
Startide Rising by David Brin – 1983
Green Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson – 1993
2010: Odyssey Two by Arthur C. Clarke – 1982
The Player of Games by Iain M. Banks – 1988

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