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061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:06:03 UTC
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061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde

It seems to me that a lot of Nava Katz's problems are self generated,
and I often just don't "get" her. For instance, in this book, she
seems to be going out of her way to cause relationship issues with
her boyfriend, obsessing (not jokingly) about what he may or may
not have gotten her for her birthday, continually seeking reassurance
from him, and seemingly imagining all the ways the relationship
could be failing. Similarly, she blows up at her mother with very
little onscreen motivation at her birthday party. Of course since
the birthday was her 21st, it could just be that she's very young
for everything that has happened to her and I just don't understand
millenials anyway.

When Nava isn't working through her free floating angst, she's
pursuing two projects, one for the Brotherhood of demon hunters, and
one against it.

Her official project is tracking down a new drug on the Vancouver
party scene. It seemingly magnifies any obsessive behavior the
ingester has to the point of grievous self (or other) harm or death.
And it seems to be demon derived.

Her unofficial project is tracking the source of corruption in the
Brotherhood itself. Her chapter seems to be clean, but the visit of
a Brotherhood ninja with a pointed warning suggests the rot is worse
than she thought.

Along the way, there are a number of demon battles, and the battle lines
are getting grayer and grayer. It doesn't seem to be affecting the
characters to any great extent yet, but I can't believe the author
wrote the scene of the young demons in the junkyard without meaning for
the readers to have serious questions about it. The way the demon which
is the source of the drug is dealt with raises a lot of questions as well.

On the whole, the story was pretty solid aside from my issues with Nava.
I did feel the ending was a bit of a let down for a) having more
relationship drama and b) losing a bit of my respect for Nava as she
reneges on a bargain which she probably shouldn't have made, but which she
did make.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 17:45:32 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde
It seems to me that a lot of Nava Katz's problems are self generated,
and I often just don't "get" her. For instance, in this book, she
seems to be going out of her way to cause relationship issues with
her boyfriend, obsessing (not jokingly) about what he may or may
not have gotten her for her birthday, continually seeking reassurance
from him, and seemingly imagining all the ways the relationship
could be failing. Similarly, she blows up at her mother with very
little onscreen motivation at her birthday party. Of course since
the birthday was her 21st, it could just be that she's very young
for everything that has happened to her and I just don't understand
millenials anyway.
When Nava isn't working through her free floating angst, she's
pursuing two projects, one for the Brotherhood of demon hunters, and
one against it.
Her official project is tracking down a new drug on the Vancouver
party scene. It seemingly magnifies any obsessive behavior the
ingester has to the point of grievous self (or other) harm or death.
And it seems to be demon derived.
Her unofficial project is tracking the source of corruption in the
Brotherhood itself. Her chapter seems to be clean, but the visit of
a Brotherhood ninja with a pointed warning suggests the rot is worse
than she thought.
Along the way, there are a number of demon battles, and the battle lines
are getting grayer and grayer. It doesn't seem to be affecting the
characters to any great extent yet, but I can't believe the author
wrote the scene of the young demons in the junkyard without meaning for
the readers to have serious questions about it. The way the demon which
is the source of the drug is dealt with raises a lot of questions as well.
On the whole, the story was pretty solid aside from my issues with Nava.
I did feel the ending was a bit of a let down for a) having more
relationship drama and b) losing a bit of my respect for Nava as she
reneges on a bargain which she probably shouldn't have made, but which she
did make.
"Unlikeable Demon Hunter" presumably describes
the character you're complaining about?
Describes accurately?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-24 18:03:28 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde
It seems to me that a lot of Nava Katz's problems are self generated,
and I often just don't "get" her. For instance, in this book, she
seems to be going out of her way to cause relationship issues with
her boyfriend, obsessing (not jokingly) about what he may or may
not have gotten her for her birthday, continually seeking reassurance
from him, and seemingly imagining all the ways the relationship
could be failing. Similarly, she blows up at her mother with very
little onscreen motivation at her birthday party. Of course since
the birthday was her 21st, it could just be that she's very young
for everything that has happened to her and I just don't understand
millenials anyway.
When Nava isn't working through her free floating angst, she's
pursuing two projects, one for the Brotherhood of demon hunters, and
one against it.
Her official project is tracking down a new drug on the Vancouver
party scene. It seemingly magnifies any obsessive behavior the
ingester has to the point of grievous self (or other) harm or death.
And it seems to be demon derived.
Her unofficial project is tracking the source of corruption in the
Brotherhood itself. Her chapter seems to be clean, but the visit of
a Brotherhood ninja with a pointed warning suggests the rot is worse
than she thought.
Along the way, there are a number of demon battles, and the battle lines
are getting grayer and grayer. It doesn't seem to be affecting the
characters to any great extent yet, but I can't believe the author
wrote the scene of the young demons in the junkyard without meaning for
the readers to have serious questions about it. The way the demon which
is the source of the drug is dealt with raises a lot of questions as well.
On the whole, the story was pretty solid aside from my issues with Nava.
I did feel the ending was a bit of a let down for a) having more
relationship drama and b) losing a bit of my respect for Nava as she
reneges on a bargain which she probably shouldn't have made, but which she
did make.
"Unlikeable Demon Hunter" presumably describes
the character you're complaining about?
Describes accurately?
Sometimes. She means well, but often you just want to grab her and
say: "Focus!", or "That's not important!"
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
h***@gmail.com
2020-03-25 03:49:46 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde
It seems to me that a lot of Nava Katz's problems are self generated,
and I often just don't "get" her. For instance, in this book, she
seems to be going out of her way to cause relationship issues with
her boyfriend, obsessing (not jokingly) about what he may or may
not have gotten her for her birthday, continually seeking reassurance
from him, and seemingly imagining all the ways the relationship
could be failing. Similarly, she blows up at her mother with very
little onscreen motivation at her birthday party. Of course since
the birthday was her 21st, it could just be that she's very young
for everything that has happened to her and I just don't understand
millenials anyway.
When Nava isn't working through her free floating angst, she's
pursuing two projects, one for the Brotherhood of demon hunters, and
one against it.
Her official project is tracking down a new drug on the Vancouver
party scene. It seemingly magnifies any obsessive behavior the
ingester has to the point of grievous self (or other) harm or death.
And it seems to be demon derived.
Her unofficial project is tracking the source of corruption in the
Brotherhood itself. Her chapter seems to be clean, but the visit of
a Brotherhood ninja with a pointed warning suggests the rot is worse
than she thought.
Along the way, there are a number of demon battles, and the battle lines
are getting grayer and grayer. It doesn't seem to be affecting the
characters to any great extent yet, but I can't believe the author
wrote the scene of the young demons in the junkyard without meaning for
the readers to have serious questions about it. The way the demon which
is the source of the drug is dealt with raises a lot of questions as well.
On the whole, the story was pretty solid aside from my issues with Nava.
I did feel the ending was a bit of a let down for a) having more
relationship drama and b) losing a bit of my respect for Nava as she
reneges on a bargain which she probably shouldn't have made, but which she
did make.
"Unlikeable Demon Hunter" presumably describes
the character you're complaining about?
Describes accurately?
I've only read the first book in the series
The setup has her as a twin to her brother who is meant to get the demon hunting powers and has been trained for it through his life.
While he got all the attention she became a massive party-girl

During the irrevocable ceremony where her brother is meant to get the power to oppose the forces of evil it instead goes to her...

So with no training she becomes part of the organisation that is meant to opposed the forces of darkness just as the excrement makes contact with the moving blades
The blurb on Amazon suggest that previously it was a males only crew as well...

As I recall her she's a snarker with authority problems but nothing outside the standard range of urban fantasy protagonists.

(she might come off worse in later books)
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-25 03:52:41 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
061 The Unlikeable Demon Hunter: Crave (Nava Katz Book 4) by Deborah Wilde
It seems to me that a lot of Nava Katz's problems are self generated,
and I often just don't "get" her. For instance, in this book, she
seems to be going out of her way to cause relationship issues with
her boyfriend, obsessing (not jokingly) about what he may or may
not have gotten her for her birthday, continually seeking reassurance
from him, and seemingly imagining all the ways the relationship
could be failing. Similarly, she blows up at her mother with very
little onscreen motivation at her birthday party. Of course since
the birthday was her 21st, it could just be that she's very young
for everything that has happened to her and I just don't understand
millenials anyway.
When Nava isn't working through her free floating angst, she's
pursuing two projects, one for the Brotherhood of demon hunters, and
one against it.
Her official project is tracking down a new drug on the Vancouver
party scene. It seemingly magnifies any obsessive behavior the
ingester has to the point of grievous self (or other) harm or death.
And it seems to be demon derived.
Her unofficial project is tracking the source of corruption in the
Brotherhood itself. Her chapter seems to be clean, but the visit of
a Brotherhood ninja with a pointed warning suggests the rot is worse
than she thought.
Along the way, there are a number of demon battles, and the battle lines
are getting grayer and grayer. It doesn't seem to be affecting the
characters to any great extent yet, but I can't believe the author
wrote the scene of the young demons in the junkyard without meaning for
the readers to have serious questions about it. The way the demon which
is the source of the drug is dealt with raises a lot of questions as well.
On the whole, the story was pretty solid aside from my issues with Nava.
I did feel the ending was a bit of a let down for a) having more
relationship drama and b) losing a bit of my respect for Nava as she
reneges on a bargain which she probably shouldn't have made, but which she
did make.
"Unlikeable Demon Hunter" presumably describes
the character you're complaining about?
Describes accurately?
I've only read the first book in the series
The setup has her as a twin to her brother who is meant to get the demon
hunting powers and has been trained for it through his life.
While he got all the attention she became a massive party-girl
During the irrevocable ceremony where her brother is meant to get the
power to oppose the forces of evil it instead goes to her...
So with no training she becomes part of the organisation that is meant
to opposed the forces of darkness just as the excrement makes contact
with the moving blades
The blurb on Amazon suggest that previously it was a males only crew as well...
As I recall her she's a snarker with authority problems but nothing
outside the standard range of urban fantasy protagonists.
(she might come off worse in later books)
And she's only 21, so I probably should cut her a break on the drama. It's
just hard for a 55+ guy to relate sometimes..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
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