Discussion:
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:05:38 UTC
Permalink
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre

I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.

Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.

*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************

Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".

Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.

Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 17:34:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).

Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-24 18:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).
Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Not a drinker, so that went right past me..

For some reason I have a very hard time spelling "villain", and it
never gets any easier no matter how many times I do it. There are
a number of other common words that always come out of my fingers wrong
as well.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 18:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).
Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Not a drinker, so that went right past me..
I'm more of a Googler. Does it refer to the story
at all? Perhaps explaining the protagonist's
impairment, they're sloshed?
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
For some reason I have a very hard time spelling "villain", and it
never gets any easier no matter how many times I do it. There are
a number of other common words that always come out of my fingers wrong
as well.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
David Johnston
2020-03-26 18:51:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).
Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Common spelling error. Like "solider". Does she work as a bartender?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-26 19:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).
Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Common spelling error. Like "solider". Does she work as a bartender?
I don't think so. I'm a little hazy on what she did right now. I think
perhaps she was a psychometric and did antiques, but that could be a
completely different heroine, and this one is from before I switched to
ebooks, so I can't just grep it.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-26 19:49:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
057 Blue Diablo: A Corine Solomon Novel by Ann Aguirre
I wanted to like this book better, but in the end I couldn't mainly
because of the narrator.
Basically she spent the whole book in "romancey" obsessing about
her relationship with her ex-lover and whether she would take up
with him again (or sleep with the gorgeous psychic cop instead).
That's fine for a slice of life book, I suppose, but here the life
of a woman she cares about is on the line, not to mention countless
other lives, and the "will I or won't I sleep with him again?" gets
old as things are blowing up and people are dying.
*********************SPOILERS FOLLOW********************************
Corine also seems incurious about pretty important things. Learning
that her father did not leave her mother and may still be alive
doesn't come close to occupying her as much as how she feels about
her "ex". Finding a magic dog doesn't seem to really interest her
either. She takes advantage of his talents once and then drops the
subject. A major episode where she thinks her "ex" is cheating on
her goes unexamined when she declines to ask the obvious questions
as to what he *was* doing when she finds out he didn't "cheat".
Finally, the other characters don't seem particularly well defined
either. An ally and his wife come off pretty well, but her ex is
an enigma, the proximate villian is never directly confronted and
the major villian escapes without even a confrontation, and a scary
killer is accepted way too easily.
Also, I have *no* idea why the book is called _Blue Diablo_. Maybe
I missed something obvious as I got to skimming in some places, but
it seems to refer to nothing.
"Blue Diablo" apparently is a cocktail made with
lemon and lime juice or cordial, tequila, and
blue "Curaçao" liqueur (made with the peel of
bitter oranges, coloured artificially).
Has someone asked yet about the word "villian"?
Common spelling error. Like "solider". Does she work as a bartender?
I don't think so. I'm a little hazy on what she did right now. I think
perhaps she was a psychometric and did antiques, but that could be a
completely different heroine, and this one is from before I switched to
ebooks, so I can't just grep it.
Goodreads confirms psychometry (she "reads" an object's
history in "vision" form), but we find her running
a pawnshop in Mexico... last time I may have mentioned
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagpuss>? But that is
more "menagerie" than "harem"... Madeleine was pretty
good at managing the mice, though.

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