Discussion:
ID this 1960s-70s elementary textbook with Isaac Asimov's "The Fun They Had"?
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2009-03-16 18:55:31 UTC
Permalink
This MAY be more than one textbook, aimed at 8- and 9-year-olds, and
the editor may or may not be Theodore Clymer. At any rate, it's NOT
"How It Is Nowadays," "With Skies and Wings" or "All Sorts of Things."

I read it in school in Massachusetts.

In "The Fun They Had," the word "comical" was used in reference to old
paper books, though that word was not in another collection of SF that
I have.

Other stories I remember from the textbook(s):

In the story about the preteen dogwalker, he outsources his jobs to
younger kids. The story starts off with his reminding one such kid to
split the profits with him - in this case, candy given by a client.
Later, a black mother (there was an illustration) comes in with her
kid - another "employee" and yells at the dogwalker because her kid's
pants got ripped and ruined due to the kid's walking two incompatible
dogs at the same time. She orders him to pay for the pants and he
does, even though he'd warned the kid not to walk those dogs together.
Later, the dogwalker takes up snow shovelling.

In "The Punk," (the title refers to the narrator's despised younger
brother) the parents say, mysteriously, they have "special shopping"
to do, so they ruin the boy's afternoon plans by leaving the "punk"
with him. Naturally being in a bad mood, when he catches his brother
trying to hide something, he suspects him of messing with his property
or some such, but when he yanks it away from his little brother and
opens it, he realizes that it's a present from "the punk" to him,
since his birthday is coming soon. I remember that at one point, he
calls the younger brother "my fine-feathered friend."

The Perfect Pancake by Virginia Kahl, minus the happy ending

Mystery Guest at Left End by Beman Lord (about a girl secretly asked
to join a football team)

The story of Daedalus and Icarus, with almost no dialogue - pretty
long and sophisticated

Beneath the Saddle (American Revolution spy story)

A story about fences in Texas

A story about a Middle Eastern boy who saves a woman's diamonds from
being stolen by hiding them in a baby's rattle

Any ideas?

Lenona.
Dorothy J Heydt
2009-03-16 19:17:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
This MAY be more than one textbook, aimed at 8- and 9-year-olds, and
the editor may or may not be Theodore Clymer. At any rate, it's NOT
"How It Is Nowadays," "With Skies and Wings" or "All Sorts of Things."
I read it in school in Massachusetts.
In "The Fun They Had," the word "comical" was used in reference to old
paper books, though that word was not in another collection of SF that
I have.
[schnipped]

Here's IMDB's list of all the places they know of where
"TFTH" is reprinted. There are a lot of them. Happy hunting.

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58943

Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at hotmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the hotmail edress.
Kithrup is getting too damn much spam, even with the sysop's filters.
l***@yahoo.com
2009-03-16 19:53:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Here's IMDB's list of all the places they know of where
"TFTH" is reprinted. There are a lot of them. Happy hunting.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58943
Thanks, but from what I can see, there are no elementary readers
listed - and the textbook I was referring to was NOT a science fiction
anthology.

It was published before 1977. That's the only other thing I'm sure of.

Lenona.
Cece
2009-03-17 16:14:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Here's IMDB's list of all the places they know of where
"TFTH" is reprinted. There are a lot of them.  Happy hunting.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58943
Thanks, but from what I can see, there are no elementary readers
listed - and the textbook I was referring to was NOT a science fiction
anthology.
It was published before 1977. That's the only other thing I'm sure of.
Lenona.
asimovonline.com lists everything he ever wrote and every book or
magazine that item has been reprinted in. Maybe the book you remember
is _Automation and its Challenge, published by Scholastic Book
Services in 1968. The story has been reprinted over 60 times, and
even asimovonline doesn't show all of them. But take a look:
http://www.asimovonline.com/oldsite/sf_fantasy_story_list.html#The%20Fun%20They%20Had
i***@rcn.com
2009-03-19 02:06:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
In "The Fun They Had," the word "comical" was used in reference to old
paper books, though that word was not in another collection of SF that
I have.
Nowadays I find "The Fun They Had" extremely ironic. Asimov never
realized (well, neither did anyone else at the time) just how much fun
kids can have without leaving the house, given technology not too
different from that in his ostensibly dystopian story.
l***@yahoo.com
2009-03-19 02:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by i***@rcn.com
Post by l***@yahoo.com
In "The Fun They Had," the word "comical" was used in reference to old
paper books, though that word was not in another collection of SF that
I have.
Nowadays I find "The Fun They Had" extremely ironic. Asimov never
realized (well, neither did anyone else at the time) just how much fun
kids can have without leaving the house, given technology not too
different from that in his ostensibly dystopian story.
According to one source, Asimov was actually satirizing the conformist
educational style of the 1950s - though I'm not sure if he meant the
"individual" approach each computer was supposed to take in the 22nd
century was actually conformist.

Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.

And I seem to remember an early 1950s "Peanuts" Sunday strip about
Lucy's taking dancing lessons so her mother can have "just one more
way of getting her out of the house," according to the other kids.

Finally, if it helps (I've already searched all over, online) I
believe the textbook was published by Ginn, and the previous(?) 3rd-
grade reading level was 10, so this one would probably be 11. (Not
sure what 11 stands for, since, again, this was a book aimed at 8- and
9-year-olds!)

Lenona.
Kay Shapero
2009-03-19 03:00:44 UTC
Permalink
In article <27905f6a-c7e4-41ad-bdd2-6726628fca08
@j8g2000yql.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com says...
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once? In Mom's hearing? I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
--
Kay Shapero
address munged, email kay at following domain
http://www.kayshapero.net
l***@yahoo.com
2009-03-19 03:52:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kay Shapero
In article <27905f6a-c7e4-41ad-bdd2-6726628fca08
@j8g2000yql.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com says...
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once? In Mom's hearing? I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
Well, I hope it hasn't changed, though I've heard some cynics argue
that modern, balky kids will simply throw tantrums if you try to
impose the usual consequences.

That is, Miss Manners' advice was to say to kids of a certain age "do
you want to find something to do, or do you want ME to find something
for you (chores, of course)?"

The other trouble is, when you have too much work to do to stop and
play, kids under a certain age (toddlers) can't necessarily be tricked
into helping with chores, since they're likely to make more work
instead of lessening it - assuming there are any available, non-
dangerous chores they could possibly help with. So there you are at
square one again.

However, there is a 1968 illustrated book called "What to Do When
'There's Nothing to Do': A Mother's Handbook-601 Tested Play Ideas for
Young Children"

Lenona.
Cece
2009-03-19 15:24:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Kay Shapero
In article <27905f6a-c7e4-41ad-bdd2-6726628fca08
@j8g2000yql.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com says...
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once?  In Mom's hearing?  I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
Well, I hope it hasn't changed, though I've heard some cynics argue
that modern, balky kids will simply throw tantrums if you try to
impose the usual consequences.
That is, Miss Manners' advice was to say to kids of a certain age "do
you want to find something to do, or do you want ME to find something
for you (chores, of course)?"
The other trouble is, when you have too much work to do to stop and
play, kids under a certain age (toddlers) can't necessarily be tricked
into helping with chores, since they're likely to make more work
instead of lessening it - assuming there are any available, non-
dangerous chores they could possibly help with. So there you are at
square one again.
However, there is a 1968 illustrated book called "What to Do When
'There's Nothing to Do': A Mother's Handbook-601 Tested Play Ideas for
Young Children"
Lenona.
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what to
do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to play
baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2009-03-19 18:58:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:24:46 -0700 (PDT), Cece
Post by Cece
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what to
do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to play
baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
We had a copy of that when I was a kid. Wonderful book, though we
never did get anywhere with some of his ideas.

I learned to play mumbledy-peg from that book -- most of the kids in
my neighborhood had never heard of it. The big hits, though, were
spool tanks and konkers.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
I'm selling my comic collection -- see http://www.watt-evans.com/comics.html
I'm serializing a novel at http://www.watt-evans.com/realmsoflight0.html
Mike Schilling
2009-03-19 19:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:24:46 -0700 (PDT), Cece
Post by Cece
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what
to do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to
play baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
We had a copy of that when I was a kid. Wonderful book, though we
never did get anywhere with some of his ideas.
I learned to play mumbledy-peg from that book -- most of the kids in
my neighborhood had never heard of it.
I know that game only from references in books, movies, and now usenet
posts. Something to do with knives, is it?
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2009-03-19 20:11:48 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Mar 2009 12:51:03 -0700, "Mike Schilling"
Post by Mike Schilling
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:24:46 -0700 (PDT), Cece
Post by Cece
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what
to do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to
play baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
We had a copy of that when I was a kid. Wonderful book, though we
never did get anywhere with some of his ideas.
I learned to play mumbledy-peg from that book -- most of the kids in
my neighborhood had never heard of it.
I know that game only from references in books, movies, and now usenet
posts. Something to do with knives, is it?
Yeah, you drop or fling a pocket knife in various ways (there's a
particular sequence) and try to get it to stick upright in the ground.
If you can't get two fingers under the handle, it's no good. If it
doesn't stick, you lose your turn and the next kid tries.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
I'm selling my comic collection -- see http://www.watt-evans.com/comics.html
I'm serializing a novel at http://www.watt-evans.com/realmsoflight0.html
Andrew Plotkin
2009-03-19 19:57:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:24:46 -0700 (PDT), Cece
Post by Cece
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what to
do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to play
baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
We had a copy of that when I was a kid. Wonderful book, though we
never did get anywhere with some of his ideas.
A treasure of my collection.
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
I learned to play mumbledy-peg from that book -- most of the kids in
my neighborhood had never heard of it. The big hits, though, were
spool tanks and konkers.
Spool tanks!

I didn't actually learn spool tanks from that book. I learned them
from a much more recent(*) kids' activity book. But when I read
_"WDYG?"..._ and it mentioned "spool tanks", I immediately recognized
them.

(* 1978, maybe.)

--Z
--
"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the borogoves..."
*
Michael Stemper
2009-03-20 12:35:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cece
Post by l***@yahoo.com
However, there is a 1968 illustrated book called "What to Do When
'There's Nothing to Do': A Mother's Handbook-601 Tested Play Ideas for
Young Children"
Have you seen the book _Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do?
Nothing_? It was written somewhere around 1960 by a man who was
amazed to learn that his son and the son's friends had no idea what to
do when there was nothing on TV and there weren't enough kids to play
baseball. He taught them mumblety-peg and marbles, and several
pastimes from his own youth, some of which included making toys to
play with.
I made the humming thing out of a button on a piece of thread. Now
that I'm reminded of this, I wish I'd shown it to my son.

My favorite parts of the book were the more gruesome urban legends,
such as:
- If you cut open a golf ball, you'll discover that the center is
filled with an acid so powerful that it'll consume the whole block.
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
--
Michael F. Stemper
#include <Standard_Disclaimer>
The FAQ for rec.arts.sf.written is at:
http://www.geocities.com/evelynleeper/sf-written
Please read it before posting.
netcat
2009-03-20 17:01:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Life is an inevitably fatal condition all in itself, so they're not much
wrong.

rgds,
netcat
Cece
2009-03-20 18:30:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by netcat
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
  and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Life is an inevitably fatal condition all in itself, so they're not much
wrong.
rgds,
netcat
Cutting that web, even if no tendon is involved, does produce a lot of
blood.
Jonathan Schattke
2009-03-20 19:13:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons. The tendons for the thumb
run down the bone to muscles in the forearm, just like the fingers. But
there would be no leverage for closing the hand, so there's the muscle
in the palm to do that, and make the thumb opposable.

See:
http://www.mmi.mcgill.ca/mmimediasampler2002/
Andrew Plotkin
2009-03-20 19:24:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Schattke
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons.
The book doesn't say "tendon". It's *any* cut in that area, including
a paper cut. Cut the skin, you die.

Yes, the book notes that kids sometimes got cuts there and didn't die.
That doesn't change what they believed about the laws of biology.

--Z
--
"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the borogoves..."
*
Michael Stemper
2009-03-20 21:16:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Plotkin
Post by Jonathan Schattke
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons.
Damnit Jim, I'm an engineer, not a physician!
Post by Andrew Plotkin
The book doesn't say "tendon". It's *any* cut in that area, including
a paper cut. Cut the skin, you die.
I am willing to admit that it has been well over four decades since
I read the book.
--
Michael F. Stemper
#include <Standard_Disclaimer>
Why doesn't anybody care about apathy?
David Goldfarb
2009-03-20 22:51:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Plotkin
Post by Jonathan Schattke
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons.
The book doesn't say "tendon". It's *any* cut in that area, including
a paper cut. Cut the skin, you die.
If that were true, I'd be dead hundreds of times over. (I've worked
in a photocopy shop for the last two decades.)
--
David Goldfarb |"I'm in the middle of fifteen things,
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | all of them annoying."
***@csua.berkeley.edu | -- Babylon 5, "Midnight on the Firing Line"
Andrew Plotkin
2009-03-20 23:45:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Andrew Plotkin
Post by Jonathan Schattke
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons.
The book doesn't say "tendon". It's *any* cut in that area, including
a paper cut. Cut the skin, you die.
If that were true, I'd be dead hundreds of times over. (I've worked
in a photocopy shop for the last two decades.)
Now that I've got my copy within reach:

----------------
Once again, it's because we grownups are always around pumping our
kids full of what we laughingly call facts. They don't want science.
They want magic. They don't want hypotheses, they want immutable
truth. They want to be, they should be, in a clearing in the jungle
painting themselves blue, dancing around the fire and making it rain
by patting snakes and shaking rattles. It is so strange: nobody, so
far as I know, sat around worrying about the insides of our heads, and
we made ourselves safe. Time enough to find out, as we are finding out
now, that nothing is so. Not even close to so.

But then: facts, facts, facts. If you cut yourself in the web of skin
between your thumb and forefinger, you die. That's it. No ifs or buts.
Cut. Die. Let's get on to other things. If you eat sugar lumps, you
get worms. If you cut a worm in half, he don't feel a thing, and you
get two worms. Grasshoppers spit tobacco. Step on a crack, break your
mother's back. Walk past a house with a quarantine sign, and don't
hold your breath, and you get sick and die. Play with yourself too
much, your brain gets soft. Cigarettes stunt your growth. Some people
are double-jointed, and by that we didn't mean any jazz like very
loose tendons or whatever the facts are. This guy had two joints where
we had one. A Dodge (if your family happened to own a Dodge) was the
best car in the whole world.

We cut our fingers in that web and didn't die, but our convictions
didn't change. We ate sugar lumps, and I don't recall getting worms,
but the fact was still there. We'd pass by the next day and both
halves of the worm would be dead, our mother's back never broke, my
sister had scarlet fever right in my own house and I must have
breathed once or twice in that time, none of our brains got *real*
soft, and we really knew that what came out of the grasshopper was not
tobacco juice. But facts were one thing, and beliefs were another.

_"Where did you go?" "Out" "What did you do?" "Nothing"_,
Robert Paul Smith, 1957
----------------

--Z
--
"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the borogoves..."
*
Kevrob
2018-06-05 22:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Plotkin
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Andrew Plotkin
Post by Jonathan Schattke
Post by Michael Stemper
- If you slice the tendon in the web of flesh between your thumb
and forefinger, it's inevitably fatal.
Um, that web has a muscle in it, not tendons.
The book doesn't say "tendon". It's *any* cut in that area, including
a paper cut. Cut the skin, you die.
If that were true, I'd be dead hundreds of times over. (I've worked
in a photocopy shop for the last two decades.)
----------------
Once again, it's because we grownups are always around pumping our
kids full of what we laughingly call facts. ...
I was in a situation unusual for the late 20th and early 21st century
American family. My parents had 9 children, within 9 years. I have
siblings who are fraternal twins. In one year, my baby sister was
in kindergarten, and there was one Robinson sibling in each year of
our 8-grade elementary school except 4th. But the twins were in 2nd
years, so we had 8 in that school. "Not having anyone to play with"
was a foreign concept, especially when we went to our summer cottage,
about this time of year, and were joined by my Dad's sister's kids -
all 10 of them. Their youngest was my age, and I'm a middle child,
so some of them were teenagers well before our oldest was, but they
were still awesome to have around for beach touch football or
volleyball, general swimming-related horseplay (diving off Cousin
Tom's 16-year-old running back shoulders, fr'instance,) messing
around with dinghies and small power boats plus bonuses like learning
swear words popular in Queens, NY.

At our "year-round" home, neighborhood kids who were bored showed up
at our house, because there was usually an age-appropriate members of
my family to hang around with, plus critical mass for team sports,
even if it were only 2-on-2 basketball.

My folks made sure we all had bikes, even if they were used, and not
the fanciest models. But when one was old enough to ride alone, or
accompanied by an older sibling who would chaperone you, trips to the
library were common. You just had to let Mom or Dad know, and give
them a chance to exercise their veto power. ["After you make your
bed and take out the trash, please."] Just getting off you duff and
getting exercise was approved of by my Dad. He was a coach and physical
education teacher, and complaints that "there's nothing to DOOOOOOoooooo!"
would be met, at least, by, "why don't you take a walk, or ride your bike?"
When my two older sisters reached their teenage years they started to let
their bikes rust in the shed we kept them in. This infuriated my Dad.
Perhaps, after puberty hit, they were a bad fit, and they might have
experienced other problems I didn't. Of course, I saved enough money
from presents and jobs I did for cash to buy a new, full-size bike when
I was 12, that served me through college, and unless the weather was
horrible or my destination very far, I preferred self-propulsion to
being driven everywhere. When you ride home, you can stop and pick
up embargoed comics and SF mags, and smuggle them into the house!

As high schoolers we were kept busy with homework, extracurricular
activities, and sometimes jobs. Who had time to be bored? There
was, perhaps, too much of what we now call "screen time," but we
managed to get good grades and into college, often with merit-based
scholarship grants.

I wonder what Home School kids think of TFTH? I know many home school
parents put together networks of kids so that they can have the common
experiences of a traditional school that take place outside of the
classroom: sports and other extracurriculars, especially. Or, they
sign the kid up for one minimum coursework at a local school, like an
AP Calculus class, so the school can inflate its headcount for state aid
and the parent doesn't have to teach something they may not know even
a little bit. The child becomes eligible to join the debate team or
the school musical.

Of course, at Chez Kevrob, books were everywhere: school books, reference
books from our families compact library, and an ever-changing array of
library books. Added to that were newspapers and magazines, and at
breakfast The Chex Press! I don't walk around with my face in a movile
phone screen, but I used to get yelled at for reading while walking,
and not looking out where I was going. ("I glance up every few lines,
honest!)

Kevin R

Chuk Goodin
2009-03-19 20:23:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Kay Shapero
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once? In Mom's hearing? I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
Well, I hope it hasn't changed, though I've heard some cynics argue
that modern, balky kids will simply throw tantrums if you try to
impose the usual consequences.
That is, Miss Manners' advice was to say to kids of a certain age "do
you want to find something to do, or do you want ME to find something
for you (chores, of course)?"
Miss Manners gives them a choice. I don't.
Post by l***@yahoo.com
The other trouble is, when you have too much work to do to stop and
play, kids under a certain age (toddlers) can't necessarily be tricked
into helping with chores, since they're likely to make more work
instead of lessening it - assuming there are any available, non-
dangerous chores they could possibly help with. So there you are at
square one again.
Toddlers love to "help" with chores (at least my three did and the
pre-schooler still does). You can usually come up with something that will
make them think they are helping without making too much extra work, and
even at 2 and a half my daughter could fold laundry. (Some laundry. Mostly
just facecloths and towels. Over and over again.)
Post by l***@yahoo.com
However, there is a 1968 illustrated book called "What to Do When
'There's Nothing to Do': A Mother's Handbook-601 Tested Play Ideas for
Young Children"
My mom had that book.
--
chuk
Kurt Busiek
2009-03-19 20:36:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuk Goodin
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Kay Shapero
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once? In Mom's hearing? I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
Well, I hope it hasn't changed, though I've heard some cynics argue
that modern, balky kids will simply throw tantrums if you try to
impose the usual consequences.
That is, Miss Manners' advice was to say to kids of a certain age "do
you want to find something to do, or do you want ME to find something
for you (chores, of course)?"
Miss Manners gives them a choice. I don't.
My mother's standard answer to "I don't have anything to doooo..." was:

"Weed the walk."

I learned to stop saying it a lot faster than my sisters did. But
then, I usually had a book to read.

kdb
Chuk Goodin
2009-03-19 21:09:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kurt Busiek
Post by Chuk Goodin
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by Kay Shapero
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Also, according to Dr. John Rosemond, kids were far less likely in the
days before TV to complain of having "nothing to do," because they
were more used to being mentally active in general, even if playmates
weren't available.
More than once? In Mom's hearing? I suspect the consequences of THAT
haven't changed much over the years. :)
Well, I hope it hasn't changed, though I've heard some cynics argue
that modern, balky kids will simply throw tantrums if you try to
impose the usual consequences.
That is, Miss Manners' advice was to say to kids of a certain age "do
you want to find something to do, or do you want ME to find something
for you (chores, of course)?"
Miss Manners gives them a choice. I don't.
"Weed the walk."
I learned to stop saying it a lot faster than my sisters did. But
then, I usually had a book to read.
I don't remember ever saying it except on long car rides with strangers.
Books were usually around.
--
chuk
Wayne Throop
2009-03-19 21:20:06 UTC
Permalink
:: My mother's standard answer to "I don't have anything to doooo..."
:: was: "Weed the walk."
:: I learned to stop saying it a lot faster than my sisters did.
:: But then, I usually had a book to read.

: ***@sfu.ca (Chuk Goodin)
: I don't remember ever saying it except on long car rides with strangers.
: Books were usually around.

Similarly. I don't remember being stuck for something to do,
as far back as my memory goes. I could always find *some*thing,
books (possibly re-reading) if nothing else. Anecdotes my parents
told of me before my current memory extends seem to indicate I could
always find things to do even pre-reading-capable. Usually not quite
what they had in mind, but *some*thing. They were (they said) just as
happy I found a favorite toy I pulled after me constantly, since it
made noise, so they could track my location conveniently. And of
course, the "it's quiet" / "yes... *too* quiet" thing, and know
to start worrying about me.

It went "zip" when it moved
And "bop" when it stopped
And "whirr" when it stood still
I never knew just what it was
And I guess I never will.

--- Marvelous Toy

"If it's not one thing, it's another thing."
--- Roseanne Roseannadanna

Wayne Throop ***@sheol.org http://sheol.org/throopw
l***@yahoo.com
2018-06-05 14:45:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
This MAY be more than one textbook, aimed at 8- and 9-year-olds, and
the editor may or may not be Theodore Clymer. At any rate, it's NOT
"How It Is Nowadays," "With Skies and Wings" or "All Sorts of Things."
I read it in school in Massachusetts.
In "The Fun They Had," the word "comical" was used in reference to old
paper books, though that word was not in another collection of SF that
I have.
In the story about the preteen dogwalker, he outsources his jobs to
younger kids. The story starts off with his reminding one such kid to
split the profits with him - in this case, candy given by a client.
Later, a black mother (there was an illustration) comes in with her
kid - another "employee" and yells at the dogwalker because her kid's
pants got ripped and ruined due to the kid's walking two incompatible
dogs at the same time. She orders him to pay for the pants and he
does, even though he'd warned the kid not to walk those dogs together.
Later, the dogwalker takes up snow shovelling.
In "The Punk," (the title refers to the narrator's despised younger
brother) the parents say, mysteriously, they have "special shopping"
to do, so they ruin the boy's afternoon plans by leaving the "punk"
with him. Naturally being in a bad mood, when he catches his brother
trying to hide something, he suspects him of messing with his property
or some such, but when he yanks it away from his little brother and
opens it, he realizes that it's a present from "the punk" to him,
since his birthday is coming soon. I remember that at one point, he
calls the younger brother "my fine-feathered friend."
The Perfect Pancake by Virginia Kahl, minus the happy ending
Mystery Guest at Left End by Beman Lord (about a girl secretly asked
to join a football team)
The story of Daedalus and Icarus, with almost no dialogue - pretty
long and sophisticated
Beneath the Saddle (American Revolution spy story)
A story about fences in Texas
A story about a Middle Eastern boy who saves a woman's diamonds from
being stolen by hiding them in a baby's rattle
Any ideas?
Lenona.
I just realized I never followed up. The book turned out to be "Joys and Journeys," with a cover drawn by Chinese-born Caldecott Medalist (and two-time HCAA nominee), Ed Young. It was compiled in 1968 by Marjorie Seddon Johnson, Roy A. Kress, John D. McNeil, and Pose Lamb.

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=11477899510&searchurl=x%3D0%26y%3D0%26sortby%3D17%26tn%3Djoys%2Band%2Bjourneys%26an%3Dmarjorie%2Bjohnson&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-image5
(cover - I can't find any photos of the inside illustrations)

It does not, however, include "The Perfect Pancake."

More on it:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.arts.books.childrens/joys$20journeys%7Csort:date/rec.arts.books.childrens/M9PWkPLPg6M/rDHZFFv4AR0J


Lenona.
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