Discussion:
"Lies Sleeping" Ben Aaronovitch
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Bill Gill
2018-11-27 14:19:39 UTC
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Permalink
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.

Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.

Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.

Bill
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-27 15:15:10 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ahasuerus
2018-11-27 16:48:44 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pe.cgi?29943 :

1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
Robert Woodward
2018-11-27 18:31:21 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
Aka _Midnight Riot_ in USA editions
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Ahasuerus
2018-11-27 19:26:20 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
Aka _Midnight Riot_ in USA editions
Oops. While snipping translations I accidentally zapped the US title.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-27 21:08:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
Thanks!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-27 21:31:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.

I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
And the Nazis and concentration camps turn out to matter quite a lot.

Old-fashioned readers might get a bit tired of the upfront LGBTQ
and multicultural representation as the series progresses. And
while I gather that in particular Ben Aaronovitch reckons he's known
enough Sierra Leone emigres in London to make that one side of
Peter Grant's family, and I can't point to anything that looks
absolutely wrong, I have an anxiety that it /may/ be massively
patronising. Peter does have a lot to say to us at first about
"African" women - meaning women of African residence and/or culture,
and mainly his own family. But Mother Thames and most of her
tributaries are also incarnated as African / black British.

Carefully presented throughout is that even in modern cosmopolitan
London it's not easy being black: Peter Grant has trouble being
seen by taxi drivers, and he is stopped and questioned by other
police while driving his own unmarked police car while being,
as I say, black. I'm pretty sure it wasn't the nice car:
Nightingale has a Jaguar. And, in comic _Body Work_, "The Most
Haunted Car in England", but they don't drive that much...
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-27 22:32:51 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear. I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives. I just don't want to *watch*.

(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed. In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Bill Gill
2018-11-27 23:31:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear. I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives. I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed. In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive. It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.

Bill
David Johnston
2018-11-28 01:58:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
I just finished this book.  It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series.  This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well.  If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order.  If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review.  Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost.  When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London.  This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work.  I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series?  This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well.  They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians.  Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear.  I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives.  I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed.  In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis.  Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis.  He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive.  It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
I suspect you were thinking of Laurell Hamilton.
Bill Gill
2018-11-28 02:35:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
I just finished this book.  It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series.  This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well.  If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order.  If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review.  Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost.  When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London.  This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work.  I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series?  This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well.  They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians.  Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear.  I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives.  I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed.  In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis.  Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis.  He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive.  It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
I suspect you were thinking of Laurell Hamilton.
Who's Laurell Hamilton. I was thinking of Mercedes Lackey.
In "Fairy Godmother" There is a place where I wrapped a piece
of paper over the tops of several pages so I would know that
I wanted to skip those pages. Some of her other books have
equally obnoxious sections.

Bill
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-28 06:17:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ahasuerus
I just finished this book.  It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series.  This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well.  If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order.  If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review.  Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost.  When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London.  This includes Mama Thames
and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work.  I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series?  This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
Post by David Johnston
has the graphical collections as well.  They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians.  Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear.  I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives.  I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed.  In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
And, at length, Nazis.  Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis.  He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive.  It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
I suspect you were thinking of Laurell Hamilton.
Who's Laurell Hamilton. I was thinking of Mercedes Lackey.
In "Fairy Godmother" There is a place where I wrapped a piece
of paper over the tops of several pages so I would know that
I wanted to skip those pages. Some of her other books have
equally obnoxious sections.
I have been known to paperclip whole chapters together, so as to
skip them unseen; and I once went so far as to tear an entire
chapter OUT. But it was a very bad book anyway.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Gary R. Schmidt
2018-11-28 11:34:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ahasuerus
I just finished this book.  It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series.  This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well.  If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order.  If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review.  Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost.  When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London.  This includes Mama Thames
and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work.  I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series?  This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
Post by David Johnston
has the graphical collections as well.  They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians.  Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear.  I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives.  I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed.  In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
And, at length, Nazis.  Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis.  He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive.  It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
I suspect you were thinking of Laurell Hamilton.
Who's Laurell Hamilton. I was thinking of Mercedes Lackey.
In "Fairy Godmother" There is a place where I wrapped a piece
of paper over the tops of several pages so I would know that
I wanted to skip those pages. Some of her other books have
equally obnoxious sections.
I have been known to paperclip whole chapters together, so as to
skip them unseen; and I once went so far as to tear an entire
chapter OUT. But it was a very bad book anyway.
Don't worry about the sex in this series, it's on the, "We went to bed,
discussed <current issue>, got distracted, and then I had to get up and
go to work" level.

Occasional bits of what happens when one kisses a River Goddess (Genius
Loci in this magical universe), and some mainly implied bits to do with
High Fae and Chimaera in relation to what happens in a brothel, but
nothing even vaguely graphic. The series is about modern-day policing,
but it doesn't go overboard, except...

...Probably the most pornographic parts are Peter's internal monologues
on Architecture in London!

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
When men talk to their friends, they insult each other.
They don't really mean it.
When women talk to their friends, they compliment each other.
They don't mean it either.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-28 06:15:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear. I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives. I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed. In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive. It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
Well, I haven't read Lackey since the sixties, so I'm unable to
judge her current porn-rating compared to others.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
(in the sixties it was all about horses, IIRC)
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-11-28 15:22:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear. I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives. I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed. In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive. It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
Well, I haven't read Lackey since the sixties, so I'm unable to
judge her current porn-rating compared to others.
You were reading her before she was published?
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-28 16:03:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians. Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Oh, dear. I can well understand that healthy young males have
strong sex drives. I just don't want to *watch*.
(I have the same problem with the St. Mary's stories, one of
which James just reviewed. In spite of their various flaws, I
find them an enjoyable read, except that at least once per volume
the two protagonists get together and boink each other for four
or five pages.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And, at length, Nazis. Well... Thomas Nightingale fought in the
Second World War; there were Nazis. He's magically longevitous.
I believe the medieval term is longaevus.
The sex isn't all that obtrusive. It doesn't come to the level
of porn that Mercedes Lackey has thrown into some of her
novels.
Well, I haven't read Lackey since the sixties, so I'm unable to
judge her current porn-rating compared to others.
You were reading her before she was published?
She did a lot of fanfic. That said, I may be mistaking a decade
or two. It was a while ago.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
a425couple
2018-11-28 19:43:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
I just finished this book.  It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series.  This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well.  If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order.  If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review.  Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost.  When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London.  This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work.  I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series?  This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well.  They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
I'll warn that this series has things that are liable to discourage
Dorothy and other sensitive readers - though I'm a happy follower.
Specifically, horrific violence, maiming and killing - mostly of
civilians.  Also, quite a strong sex drive of the young male lead.
Well, I thank Bill for posting and starting this subject.
I am normally not into fantasy & ghosts etc.
But I spent a pretty good career in law enforcement
(It was good work, worth doing well, in a good organization.)
and definitely found an off beat sense of humor helpful.

I went to amazon,
https://www.amazon.com/Rivers-London-Ben-Aaronovitch/dp/0575097582/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=
and was going to suggest the FREE "look inside"
to Dorthy, but sounds like she has already decided against
this book.

Well, I found the first 8 pages interesting, and so,
I am splurging a whole $5.25 on a copy!

"This is because nothing builds character like being
abused, spat at and vomited on by members of the public."

"Being a seasoned Londoner, Martin gave the body the
"London once-over" - a quick glance to determine whether this
was a drunk, a crazy or a human in distress. The fact that
it was entirely possible for someone to be all three
simultaneously is why good-Samaritanism in London is considered
an extreme sport."
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-28 23:53:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Bill Gill
I just finished this book. It continues the good quality of
the previous Rivers of London series. This one wraps up the
story arc of the Rivers and does it quite well. If anybody
wants to read this one who hasn't read the previous books
I suggest that they start with number 1 and continue through
in order. If they don't they will have problems figuring out
what is going on.
Quick review. Peter Grant is a young Police Constable in London
when he meets a ghost. When it is realized that he has the makings
of a wizard he becomes an apprentice to Chief Inspector Nightingale.
Nightingale is the head of the magical division of the London Police.
Peter meets a lot of magical people and entities, including the gods
and goddesses of the rivers of London. This includes Mama Thames and
Poppa Thames, who are not related and don't necessarily get along
all that well.
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
Could you post a list of the titles in the series? This sounds
interesting, and I'd like to save a list to disk against whenever
I have book money again.
1 Rivers of London (2011)
2 Moon Over Soho (2011)
3 Whispers Under Ground (2012)
4 Broken Homes (2013)
5 Foxglove Summer (2014)
5.5 The Furthest Station (2017) [short]
6 The Hanging Tree (2016)
7 Lies Sleeping (2018)
The Home Crowd Advantage (2012) [short]
The PC Grant Novels (2013) [Omnibus/1,2,3]
The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Granny (2015) [short]
<http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.com/p/a-chronology-of-rivers-of-london-books.html>
has the graphical collections as well. They're "in continuity"
but not strictly necessary.
Oh, and - _Lies Sleeping_ is going on my Christmas wish list,
so I'm not reading it till then - but that "chronology" has
forthcoming titles after as well as before the latest book.

Blurry cover seems to be placeholder made from existing book art,
_The Fey and the Furious_ is probably a graphical series / collection,
_The October Man_ is next year's novella set in Trier, Germany,
probably extremely tangential to anything that happened in England
(I was honestly alarmed to see how pleased the author seemed
to say he was at "discovering" novella-length publishing in
_The Farthest Station_ and how much easier it is), Abigail and,
er, Reynolds get backdated novellas, and there is a "Book 8" on
the map - so to speak.

I assume that London itself still exists after _Lies Sleeping_,
but property violence is another theme of the series. The "Rivers"...
are in The Faceless Man's sights already, from _The Hanging Tree_.
So at minimum, the city map could end up pretty different next time...

Incidentally, _Detective Stories_ is awkward to date because
its nominal setting is Peter Grant being assessed for promotion
to Detective Constable by presenting four cases he's investigated
at previous dates,including one before _Rivers of London_ itself
introduced him to magic. There's a couple of nice visual flashbacks
to the novels - well, if significant scenes of _Moon Over Soho_
are "nice" - and each of the graphic collections or pamphlets also
has quickie stories, mostly one-page gags with the supporting cast,
and maybe a text feature or three.

In my copy of "Moon" he introduces himself as "DC" at one or two
points, but this may be temporary elevated responsibility (Nightingale
having not recovered after the previous volume), a small misprint,
author's mistake (these have been confessed to), or a rather
controversial lie in a crisis. I think he's in plain clothes,
which I suspect is also unusual at this rank outside the police
wizarding division.
Bernard Peek
2018-11-30 20:26:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bill Gill
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
I'm not sure why you think that. It's only the start of an arc about Bev who
is one of the rivers.
--
Bernard Peek
***@shrdlu.com
Bill Gill
2018-12-01 14:32:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bernard Peek
Post by Bill Gill
Since this closes the arc on the Rivers series I am wondering if
Ben has anything new in work. I certainly hope so.
I'm not sure why you think that. It's only the start of an arc about Bev who
is one of the rivers.
I'm not sure what you mean? "the start of an arc". In "Lies Sleeping"
the Faceless Man is terminated. The Faceless Man was the center point
of most of the stories. That certainly sounds like the end of
an arc, not the start of a new one.

Bill

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