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OT - Startup - Use A Hypersonic Catapult To Throw Satellites Directly Into Space By 2022
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a425couple
2019-07-09 18:21:52 UTC
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https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonathanocallaghan/2019/06/27/this-startup-plans-to-throw-satellites-directly-into-space-with-a-hypersonic-catapult-by-2022/?fbclid=IwAR04yCB04ynRnfqQAe4b_p2u6Vbi1iS4NB-XjHDQq8KNPeGi_3mk6ZZH5-w#5a6411131a31

Jun 27, 2019, 10:44am
This Startup Wants To Use A Hypersonic Catapult To Throw Satellites
Directly Into Space By 2022

Jonathan O'Callaghan Contributor
Science
I cover rocket launches, space exploration, space science, and more.

Few details have been released by the company so far. SPINLAUNCH
A secretive startup has been awarded a launch contract for the U.S.
military using a rather novel launch system – based on kinetic energy
technology that would essentially shoot satellites directly into space
using a hypersonic vehicle.

Last week on Wednesday, June 19, California-based company SpinLaunch
announced they had secured a launch contract with the U.S. Department of
Defense (DOD). They didn’t release any further details, other than
noting it was a “responsive launch prototype contract… for kinetic
energy-based launch services.”

The company was founded back in 2014 but only emerged into the public
eye in 2018 after spending four years in stealth mode. The company
raised $40 million in Series A funding in April last year from Airbus
Ventures, Google Ventures, and Kleiner Perkins. They are touting launch
costs of $250,000, and up to five launches per day. It’s unclear what
the weight limit is per launch.

On its website the company says it is aiming to build “the world’s
lowest cost space launch system”, taking small satellites into low Earth
orbit (LEO). It says it is the only kinetic energy-based launch system
that will be capable of sending satellites into orbit without the use of
rockets.

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Based on an image released by the company (above), it looks like they
will spin some sort of vehicle in a circular chamber up to high speeds,
before releasing it like a catapult and sending it to space. The company
says it has used technology from mining and wind turbines to “construct
an innovative mass acceleration system”, which can reach orbit without
using large amounts of fuel like traditional rockets.

Mass drivers have been considered before as a way to return cargo from
the Moon to Earth, such as in the 2009 movie "Moon".
Mass drivers have been considered before as a way to return cargo from
the Moon to Earth, such as in the 2009 movie "Moon". NASA
After reaching a high enough altitude, noted as above the atmosphere,
SpinLaunch will use an onboard rocket to provide the final kick to reach
orbit. Other details haven’t been released at the moment, although they
are aiming for their first launch in 2022. The company did not respond
to a request for comment.

“This will truly be a disruptive enabler for the emerging commercial
space industry,” the company’s founder and CEO, Jonathan Yaney, noted in
the statement last week. “There is a promising market surge in the
demand for LEO constellations of inexpensive small satellites for
disaster monitoring, weather, reconnaissance, communications, and other
services.”

SpinLaunch recently relocated to a new headquarters in Long Beach,
California in January 2019, and has also built a $7 million test
facility at Spaceport America in New Mexico (where Virgin Galactic
operates from). They are planning to conduct their first flight tests in
early 2020.

There has been quite a lot of discussion about kinetic energy launch
systems over the years, often called mass drivers or mass accelerators,
but no company or organization has ever used such a system to reach
orbit. In an interview with TechCrunch last year, however, Yaney said he
believes his company can succeed.

“SpinLaunch employs a rotational acceleration method, harnessing angular
momentum to gradually accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speeds,” he
said. “This approach employs a dramatically lower cost architecture with
much lower power.”

The use of “hypersonic” suggests SpinLaunch are looking to reach speeds
above Mach 5, which is five times the speed of sound or about 4,000
miles per hour. There are issues there with things like air resistance,
but the aerodynamic shape of the vehicle designed by SpinLaunch has
likely been developed with this in mind.

If the company can be successful it would certainly be impressive,
providing an alternative to existing smallsat launchers like Rocket Lab
and Virgin Orbit. And if they’re true to their word, we could see some
tests of their novel system as early as the start of next year.

Jonathan O'Callaghan
Jonathan O'Callaghan Contributor
Jonathan is a space and science journalist that specializes in
commercial spaceflight, space exploration, and space science. He has
covered the industry for almost a dec... Read More
Jack Bohn
2019-07-10 13:00:32 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonathanocallaghan/2019/06/27/this-startup-plans-to-throw-satellites-directly-into-space-with-a-hypersonic-catapult-by-2022/?fbclid=IwAR04yCB04ynRnfqQAe4b_p2u6Vbi1iS4NB-XjHDQq8KNPeGi_3mk6ZZH5-w#5a6411131a31
Jun 27, 2019, 10:44am
This Startup Wants To Use A Hypersonic Catapult To Throw Satellites
Directly Into Space By 2022
Jonathan O'Callaghan Contributor
Science
I cover rocket launches, space exploration, space science, and more.
Few details have been released by the company so far. SPINLAUNCH
A secretive startup has been awarded a launch contract for the U.S.
military using a rather novel launch system – based on kinetic energy
technology that would essentially shoot satellites directly into space
using a hypersonic vehicle.
Last week on Wednesday, June 19, California-based company SpinLaunch
announced they had secured a launch contract with the U.S. Department of
Defense (DOD). They didn’t release any further details, other than
noting it was a “responsive launch prototype contract… for kinetic
energy-based launch services.”
The company was founded back in 2014 but only emerged into the public
eye in 2018 after spending four years in stealth mode. The company
raised $40 million in Series A funding in April last year from Airbus
Ventures, Google Ventures, and Kleiner Perkins. They are touting launch
costs of $250,000, and up to five launches per day. It’s unclear what
the weight limit is per launch.
On its website the company says it is aiming to build “the world’s
lowest cost space launch system”, taking small satellites into low Earth
orbit (LEO). It says it is the only kinetic energy-based launch system
that will be capable of sending satellites into orbit without the use of
rockets.
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE
UNICEF USA BRANDVOICE
Lessons Learned And Money Raised On The Slopes Of Kilimanjaro
UNICEF USA BRANDVOICE
UNICEF Is Mobilizing To Protect Migrant Children In The U.S.
Grads of Life BRANDVOICE
Creating Pathways To Quality Jobs: Why It Pays To Listen To Your Workers
Based on an image released by the company (above), it looks like they
will spin some sort of vehicle in a circular chamber up to high speeds,
before releasing it like a catapult and sending it to space. The company
says it has used technology from mining and wind turbines to “construct
an innovative mass acceleration system”, which can reach orbit without
using large amounts of fuel like traditional rockets.
Mass drivers have been considered before as a way to return cargo from
the Moon to Earth, such as in the 2009 movie "Moon".
Mass drivers have been considered before as a way to return cargo from
the Moon to Earth, such as in the 2009 movie "Moon". NASA
After reaching a high enough altitude, noted as above the atmosphere,
SpinLaunch will use an onboard rocket to provide the final kick to reach
orbit. Other details haven’t been released at the moment, although they
are aiming for their first launch in 2022. The company did not respond
to a request for comment.
“This will truly be a disruptive enabler for the emerging commercial
space industry,” the company’s founder and CEO, Jonathan Yaney, noted in
the statement last week. “There is a promising market surge in the
demand for LEO constellations of inexpensive small satellites for
disaster monitoring, weather, reconnaissance, communications, and other
services.”
SpinLaunch recently relocated to a new headquarters in Long Beach,
California in January 2019, and has also built a $7 million test
facility at Spaceport America in New Mexico (where Virgin Galactic
operates from). They are planning to conduct their first flight tests in
early 2020.
There has been quite a lot of discussion about kinetic energy launch
systems over the years, often called mass drivers or mass accelerators,
but no company or organization has ever used such a system to reach
orbit. In an interview with TechCrunch last year, however, Yaney said he
believes his company can succeed.
“SpinLaunch employs a rotational acceleration method, harnessing angular
momentum to gradually accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speeds,” he
said. “This approach employs a dramatically lower cost architecture with
much lower power.”
The use of “hypersonic” suggests SpinLaunch are looking to reach speeds
above Mach 5, which is five times the speed of sound or about 4,000
miles per hour. There are issues there with things like air resistance,
but the aerodynamic shape of the vehicle designed by SpinLaunch has
likely been developed with this in mind.
If the company can be successful it would certainly be impressive,
providing an alternative to existing smallsat launchers like Rocket Lab
and Virgin Orbit. And if they’re true to their word, we could see some
tests of their novel system as early as the start of next year.
Jonathan O'Callaghan
Jonathan O'Callaghan Contributor
Jonathan is a space and science journalist that specializes in
commercial spaceflight, space exploration, and space science. He has
covered the industry for almost a dec... Read More
Ron Miller, space and science fiction artist.
Ron Miller, space and science fiction artist.

Ron Miller, a space/science fiction artist, is also a student of the history of spaceflight. Paging through his _The Dream Machines_, a compendium of that history, the first use of spinning for launch I note is 1869, with Edward Everett ("The Man Without a Country") Hale's _The Brick Moon_. Two flywheels, not quite touching, are spun up in opposite directions by a waterfall-powered wheel, and the prebuilt navigation satellite is dropped in the space between them to be flung upwards. He is not entirely serious, I should read the book, sometime.

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He then dates some Tsiolkovsky speculations to the 1870, and lists various proposals with actual numbers from the 1910s. I'm assuming they got their math right, although I can't get the numbers for the diameter, rotation, and rim speed to agree, so I'll repeat the numbers he reports: A wheel 80 meters in diameter spins up to 65 rpm by a steam turbine, throwing a 2100 kg capsule off at 65,000 m/s, A similar wheel 328 feet in radius at 40 turns per second has a tangential velocity of 7.2 miles per second, A simplified counter-weighted beam 50 m long spun up to 44 rpm by a 12,000 hp motor over 7 hours before launching its payload at 14km/s, finally, A partially evacuated tunnel, 120 km around, in which an oil-levitated train accelerates for 55 minutes before shunting down the tangential launch tunnel.

We at least avoid the accelerations of the Verne cannon. But still, spending an hour or hours getting up to escape velocity brings to mind words Arthur C. Clarke used in a different context: "sea-level meteor," or even an Everest-height meteor. At least with a vacuum tunnel we only face maximum pressure for a moment, as it loses speed and air pressure with height. But I worry about the projectile meeting that air as it exits the tunnel. Is there a way to fill the tangential section of the tunnel with gas quickly? Gas moving with about the velocity of the projectile?

-Jack

Jack has been posting to USENET for quite a long time.
See more
--
-Jack
-dsr-
2019-07-10 20:37:22 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jack Bohn
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonathanocallaghan/2019/06/27/this-startup-plans-to-throw-satellites-directly-into-space-with-a-hypersonic-catapult-by-2022/?fbclid=IwAR04yCB04ynRnfqQAe4b_p2u6Vbi1iS4NB-XjHDQq8KNPeGi_3mk6ZZH5-w#5a6411131a31
After reaching a high enough altitude, noted as above the atmosphere,
SpinLaunch will use an onboard rocket to provide the final kick to reach
orbit. Other details haven’t been released at the moment, although they
are aiming for their first launch in 2022. The company did not respond
to a request for comment.
...
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by a425couple
The use of “hypersonic” suggests SpinLaunch are looking to reach speeds
above Mach 5, which is five times the speed of sound or about 4,000
miles per hour. There are issues there with things like air resistance,
but the aerodynamic shape of the vehicle designed by SpinLaunch has
likely been developed with this in mind.
He then dates some Tsiolkovsky speculations to the 1870, and lists various proposals with actual numbers from the 1910s. I'm assuming they got their math right, although I can't get the numbers for the diameter, rotation, and rim speed to agree, so I'll repeat the numbers he reports: A wheel 80 meters in diameter spins up to 65 rpm by a steam turbine, throwing a 2100 kg capsule off at 65,000 m/s, A similar wheel 328 feet in radius at 40 turns per second has a tangential velocity of 7.2 miles per second, A simplified counter-weighted beam 50 m long spun up to 44 rpm by a 12,000 hp motor over 7 hours before launching its payload at 14km/s, finally, A partially evacuated tunnel, 120 km around, in which an oil-levitated train accelerates for 55 minutes before shunting down the tangential launch tunnel.
So we have a 40m lever arm completing a circle in a little less than a second.
Let's call that a 50m arm in exactly a second. C = pi *d, so 314m/s, which is
702 miles per hour. That's not going to do it.

If you want Mach at 20 degrees C, 1 atmosphere, that's 1700m/s.

arm length rotations/second tip velocity % of 7.5Km/s LEO
50m 1 314m/s 4
50m 5 1570m/s 21
100m 4 2512m/s 33
100m 40 25120m/s 330
60000m 1/60 3140m/s 42

Note that the 100m arm at 40 rotations/sec has a centrifugal acceleration
of half a million gravities. Maybe that's not going to work out well.
Post by Jack Bohn
We at least avoid the accelerations of the Verne cannon. But still, spending an hour or hours getting up to escape velocity brings to mind words Arthur C. Clarke used in a different context: "sea-level meteor," or even an Everest-height meteor. At least with a vacuum tunnel we only face maximum pressure for a moment, as it loses speed and air pressure with height. But I worry about the projectile meeting that air as it exits the tunnel. Is there a way to fill the tangential section of the tunnel with gas quickly? Gas moving with about the velocity of the projectile?
If you want gas moving at about a projectile's velocity, there's this
existing method for generating it. It's called a detonation.

That doesn't help much when the hypersonic launch vehicle exits the accelerator,
though -- there's roughly 200Km of progressively reduced atmosphere to get
through. And even then, there's a lot of rocket fuel behind the payload to
get it up to LEO velocity.

-dsr-
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2019-07-11 20:19:18 UTC
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I'll be amazed.
--
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Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
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