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YASID: the Big Networked computers give one answer; a college kid's..
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danny burstein
2018-11-27 19:17:44 UTC
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Ok, I don't know how much vaguer I can be...

Very roughly 1980, probably Analog

There's an internationally networked system of computers
which are giving one answer to some major problems
facing the world (damn if I can remember what it was).

However, a college kid, or some random staffer.. has
his own, standalone unit. And it gives completely
different responses.

It turns out, of course, that the Big Systems
are lying, so to speak.

I'm probably mangling bunches of other stories into
this, but somewhere I'm seeing the term "Michaelmas"
and a Walter Cronkite type of well respected
news reporter. Maybe.

What got me thinking back to this was a little news
snippet about how A Big Cloud Server [a] has been pumping
lots of lobbying money into NYC politicians trying
to get the municipal computing transferred from city
owned and operated systems to the BCS's facilities...

Does this sound at all familiar? Thanks

[a] Happens to be Amazon that got into the news, but
the other half dozen serious contenders are doing
it, too.
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
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[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-11-27 20:19:43 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
Ok, I don't know how much vaguer I can be...
Very roughly 1980, probably Analog
There's an internationally networked system of computers
which are giving one answer to some major problems
facing the world (damn if I can remember what it was).
However, a college kid, or some random staffer.. has
his own, standalone unit. And it gives completely
different responses.
It turns out, of course, that the Big Systems
are lying, so to speak.
I'm probably mangling bunches of other stories into
this, but somewhere I'm seeing the term "Michaelmas"
and a Walter Cronkite type of well respected
news reporter. Maybe.
What got me thinking back to this was a little news
snippet about how A Big Cloud Server [a] has been pumping
lots of lobbying money into NYC politicians trying
to get the municipal computing transferred from city
owned and operated systems to the BCS's facilities...
Does this sound at all familiar? Thanks
[a] Happens to be Amazon that got into the news, but
the other half dozen serious contenders are doing
it, too.
Algis Budrys _Michaelmas_ (1977)

I think there are some other stories in this setting which may
be called something like "The Warbirds Universe"
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-27 21:38:16 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by danny burstein
Ok, I don't know how much vaguer I can be...
Very roughly 1980, probably Analog
There's an internationally networked system of computers
which are giving one answer to some major problems
facing the world (damn if I can remember what it was).
However, a college kid, or some random staffer.. has
his own, standalone unit. And it gives completely
different responses.
It turns out, of course, that the Big Systems
are lying, so to speak.
I'm probably mangling bunches of other stories into
this, but somewhere I'm seeing the term "Michaelmas"
and a Walter Cronkite type of well respected
news reporter. Maybe.
What got me thinking back to this was a little news
snippet about how A Big Cloud Server [a] has been pumping
lots of lobbying money into NYC politicians trying
to get the municipal computing transferred from city
owned and operated systems to the BCS's facilities...
Does this sound at all familiar? Thanks
[a] Happens to be Amazon that got into the news, but
the other half dozen serious contenders are doing
it, too.
Algis Budrys _Michaelmas_ (1977)
I think there are some other stories in this setting which may
be called something like "The Warbirds Universe"
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Was anyone else thinking of Asimov, "The Evitable Conflict"?
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-27 22:35:21 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by danny burstein
Ok, I don't know how much vaguer I can be...
Very roughly 1980, probably Analog
There's an internationally networked system of computers
which are giving one answer to some major problems
facing the world (damn if I can remember what it was).
However, a college kid, or some random staffer.. has
his own, standalone unit. And it gives completely
different responses.
It turns out, of course, that the Big Systems
are lying, so to speak.
I'm probably mangling bunches of other stories into
this, but somewhere I'm seeing the term "Michaelmas"
and a Walter Cronkite type of well respected
news reporter. Maybe.
What got me thinking back to this was a little news
snippet about how A Big Cloud Server [a] has been pumping
lots of lobbying money into NYC politicians trying
to get the municipal computing transferred from city
owned and operated systems to the BCS's facilities...
Does this sound at all familiar? Thanks
[a] Happens to be Amazon that got into the news, but
the other half dozen serious contenders are doing
it, too.
Algis Budrys _Michaelmas_ (1977)
I think there are some other stories in this setting which may
be called something like "The Warbirds Universe"
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Was anyone else thinking of Asimov, "The Evitable Conflict"?
Not really, since the machines in that story are managing
humanity for its own good. One could argue whether this is a
good thing or not, but First Law holds, after its fashion.
Somebody might not get the high-paying job he was hoping to get,
but nobody starves.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
a***@msn.com
2018-11-30 03:39:39 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Algis Budrys _Michaelmas_ (1977)
I think there are some other stories in this setting which may
be called something like "The Warbirds Universe"
ISFDB reports two other stories in this universe http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pe.cgi?26106 "The Nuptial Flight of the Warbirds" and "A Scraping at the Bones."
f***@gmail.com
2018-11-28 07:44:36 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Not really, since the machines in that story are managing
humanity for its own good. One could argue whether this is a
good thing or not, but First Law holds, after its fashion.
Somebody might not get the high-paying job he was hoping to get,
but nobody starves.
Yeah, but Asimov's Robots always come across as a little creeping when they're "doing things for humanity's own good".

If this is the story I'm thinking about then people lost their businesses and reputations, because they were anti-machine, anti-Robot (again if this is the story I think it is then the 'Robots' are actually a handful of enormous positronic brains (did Asimov call them 'Minds') sitting behind the world's ultimate security barrier). In some cases the Machines hadn't even waited for the humans do actually do or say something anti-Robot. The humans had been targeted because the Robots predicted future behavior accurately based on present behavior.

The availability of a small stand alone unit that is apparently considered to be the equal of the networked or Big brains strongly suggests it isn't the Asimov. When Asimov does have 'stand alone' units they are normally called Robots and have a name with a R. prefix.

Take care and regards

Frank
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-28 13:59:07 UTC
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Post by f***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Not really, since the machines in that story are managing
humanity for its own good. One could argue whether this is a
good thing or not, but First Law holds, after its fashion.
Somebody might not get the high-paying job he was hoping to get,
but nobody starves.
Yeah, but Asimov's Robots always come across as a little creeping when
they're "doing things for humanity's own good".
If this is the story I'm thinking about then people lost their
businesses and reputations, because they were anti-machine, anti-Robot
(again if this is the story I think it is then the 'Robots' are actually
a handful of enormous positronic brains (did Asimov call them 'Minds')
sitting behind the world's ultimate security barrier). In some cases the
Machines hadn't even waited for the humans do actually do or say
something anti-Robot. The humans had been targeted because the Robots
predicted future behavior accurately based on present behavior.
No. The Machines in "The Inevitable Conflict" are benevolent
toward *humanity as a whole.* They can inconvenience some
humans for the benefit of the species, but they don't give a damn
whether those humans or any others are anti-robot.
Post by f***@gmail.com
The availability of a small stand alone unit that is apparently
considered to be the equal of the networked or Big brains strongly
suggests it isn't the Asimov. When Asimov does have 'stand alone' units
they are normally called Robots and have a name with a R. prefix.
Yes. I don't think "TEC" is what the OP was looking for at all.

I wonder if he's looking for Williamson's "With Folded Hands,"
later expanded into _The Humanoids_? Their motto IIRC was "To
serve and protect, and keep men from harm." But they protected
them from anything that might possibly be harmful, thus
stultifying development. It's been decades since I read it, but
I do recall one scene in which a man lights up a cigarette and
the robot takes it away from him because *fire is dangerous.*

But the concept of one independent machine giving superior
answers to those provided by the network at large sounds more
like Murray Leinster's "A Logic Named Joe," except the network at
large wasn't inimical to humans; it just wasn't as smart as Joe.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-29 00:26:02 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by f***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Not really, since the machines in that story are managing
humanity for its own good. One could argue whether this is a
good thing or not, but First Law holds, after its fashion.
Somebody might not get the high-paying job he was hoping to get,
but nobody starves.
Yeah, but Asimov's Robots always come across as a little creeping when
they're "doing things for humanity's own good".
If this is the story I'm thinking about then people lost their
businesses and reputations, because they were anti-machine, anti-Robot
(again if this is the story I think it is then the 'Robots' are actually
a handful of enormous positronic brains (did Asimov call them 'Minds')
sitting behind the world's ultimate security barrier). In some cases the
Machines hadn't even waited for the humans do actually do or say
something anti-Robot. The humans had been targeted because the Robots
predicted future behavior accurately based on present behavior.
No. The Machines in "The Inevitable Conflict" are benevolent
toward *humanity as a whole.* They can inconvenience some
humans for the benefit of the species, but they don't give a damn
whether those humans or any others are anti-robot.
Post by f***@gmail.com
The availability of a small stand alone unit that is apparently
considered to be the equal of the networked or Big brains strongly
suggests it isn't the Asimov. When Asimov does have 'stand alone' units
they are normally called Robots and have a name with a R. prefix.
Yes. I don't think "TEC" is what the OP was looking for at all.
I wonder if he's looking for Williamson's "With Folded Hands,"
later expanded into _The Humanoids_? Their motto IIRC was "To
serve and protect, and keep men from harm." But they protected
them from anything that might possibly be harmful, thus
stultifying development. It's been decades since I read it, but
I do recall one scene in which a man lights up a cigarette and
the robot takes it away from him because *fire is dangerous.*
But the concept of one independent machine giving superior
answers to those provided by the network at large sounds more
like Murray Leinster's "A Logic Named Joe," except the network at
large wasn't inimical to humans; it just wasn't as smart as Joe.
I think the story was correctly identified as _Michaelmas_,
which is the protagonist's name and not the Christian holiday.
But Michaelmas's own unit is rather uniquely powerful.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michaelmas_%28novel%29> says more.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_the_Troubles_of_the_World> (1958)
is another short story of Asimov's that people may know; for the sake
of those who don't, I'll just recommend reading the story, or the
summary, without saying why, except that the big computer is Multivac
and isn't positronic.

A rather startling detail is that this is an America - or a
world state - in which children are property of the male head
of household until age eighteen. Perhaps this is accurate
for 1958? And perhaps James Nicoll would like to blow some
millennial minds with this one. ;-)

(vgf nyfb erdhverq ol gur cybg)
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