Discussion:
_Melt Down: A Breakers Novel_ by Edward W. Robertson
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Lynn McGuire
2018-11-26 20:49:02 UTC
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_Melt Down: A Breakers Novel_ by Edward W. Robertson

https://www.amazon.com/Melt-Down-Breakers-Edward-Robertson/dp/1480131997/

Book number two of an eight boor alien invasion apocalyptic series. I
read the well formatted and bound POD (print on demand) trade paperback.
I am reading book number three in the series now. I have yet to
decide if I am going to buy and read book number four in the series.

This book starts off in the same place as book number one, right before
the aliens release their genetically engineered human killer virus that
kills 99% of the world's population. But there is a whole slate of
different people and their stories as they struggle to survive, fighting
with the other survivors for dwindling resources and the alien crablike
creatures.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.4 out of 5 stars (212 reviews)

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-26 22:20:49 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
_Melt Down: A Breakers Novel_ by Edward W. Robertson
https://www.amazon.com/Melt-Down-Breakers-Edward-Robertson/dp/1480131997/
Book number two of an eight boor alien invasion apocalyptic series. I
read the well formatted and bound POD (print on demand) trade paperback.
I am reading book number three in the series now. I have yet to
decide if I am going to buy and read book number four in the series.
This book starts off in the same place as book number one, right before
the aliens release their genetically engineered human killer virus that
kills 99% of the world's population. But there is a whole slate of
different people and their stories as they struggle to survive, fighting
with the other survivors for dwindling resources and the alien crablike
creatures.
I'm gonna assume they are fighting for the alien crablike creatures
which are delicious. ;-)
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-26 23:02:27 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Melt Down: A Breakers Novel_ by Edward W. Robertson
https://www.amazon.com/Melt-Down-Breakers-Edward-Robertson/dp/1480131997/
Book number two of an eight boor alien invasion apocalyptic series. I
read the well formatted and bound POD (print on demand) trade paperback.
I am reading book number three in the series now. I have yet to
decide if I am going to buy and read book number four in the series.
This book starts off in the same place as book number one, right before
the aliens release their genetically engineered human killer virus that
kills 99% of the world's population. But there is a whole slate of
different people and their stories as they struggle to survive, fighting
with the other survivors for dwindling resources and the alien crablike
creatures.
I'm gonna assume they are fighting for the alien crablike creatures
which are delicious. ;-)
I guess I forgot to mention that the alien crablike creatures are eight
feet tall, quite strong, and have laser weapons. So, who would be
eating who ?

Lynn
-dsr-
2018-11-28 20:15:06 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Melt Down: A Breakers Novel_ by Edward W. Robertson
https://www.amazon.com/Melt-Down-Breakers-Edward-Robertson/dp/1480131997/
Book number two of an eight boor alien invasion apocalyptic series. I
read the well formatted and bound POD (print on demand) trade paperback.
I am reading book number three in the series now. I have yet to
decide if I am going to buy and read book number four in the series.
This book starts off in the same place as book number one, right before
the aliens release their genetically engineered human killer virus that
kills 99% of the world's population. But there is a whole slate of
different people and their stories as they struggle to survive, fighting
with the other survivors for dwindling resources and the alien crablike
creatures.
I'm gonna assume they are fighting for the alien crablike creatures
which are delicious. ;-)
I guess I forgot to mention that the alien crablike creatures are eight
feet tall, quite strong, and have laser weapons. So, who would be
eating who ?
Historically? The ones who shoot from cover (early) or use indirect fire weapons (later).

-dsr-
f***@gmail.com
2018-11-29 06:58:24 UTC
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Greets

Am I the only one who automatically assumed 'crab-like' aliens = Prador (Neal Asher), and are thus:

Not tasty and delicious (no matter how well you cook them) and,
going to be freaking dangerous at all ranges.

Re: indirect fire weapons - make them nuclear armed if these guys are any thing like the Prador.

Regards
Frank
Greg Goss
2018-11-29 08:35:45 UTC
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Post by f***@gmail.com
Greets
Not tasty and delicious (no matter how well you cook them) and,
going to be freaking dangerous at all ranges.
Re: indirect fire weapons - make them nuclear armed if these guys are any thing like the Prador.
I still remember when I could remember things.

There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.

One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.

The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.

The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.

I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
-dsr-
2018-11-29 12:53:40 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by f***@gmail.com
Greets
Not tasty and delicious (no matter how well you cook them) and,
going to be freaking dangerous at all ranges.
Re: indirect fire weapons - make them nuclear armed if these guys are any thing like the Prador.
I still remember when I could remember things.
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're thinking
of is Niven's Flare Time.

-dsr-
Greg Goss
2018-11-30 05:17:26 UTC
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Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're thinking
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.

But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-30 13:52:42 UTC
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Post by -dsr-
Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're
thinking
Post by -dsr-
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
Could you be thinking of Asimov's _The Gods Themselves_? That
came out in 1972; it was serialized in three parts, published in
Galaxy, If, and Galaxy again.

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1861

Not inappropriately, since the first and third episode took place
on and around Earth, and the second in a *really* different
universe.

But that wasn't a shared-world production in the usual sense,
since it was all by Asimov.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Greg Goss
2018-11-30 15:22:43 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by -dsr-
Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're
thinking
Post by -dsr-
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
Could you be thinking of Asimov's _The Gods Themselves_? That
came out in 1972; it was serialized in three parts, published in
Galaxy, If, and Galaxy again.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1861
Not inappropriately, since the first and third episode took place
on and around Earth, and the second in a *really* different
universe.
But that wasn't a shared-world production in the usual sense,
since it was all by Asimov.
No, I read TGT in book form.

I'm talking about the Medea shared world writing project, but a
novel-length story serialized in an eighties magazine, not a short
story in the Harlan's World book.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
J. Clarke
2018-11-30 16:18:47 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by -dsr-
Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're
thinking
Post by -dsr-
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
Could you be thinking of Asimov's _The Gods Themselves_? That
came out in 1972; it was serialized in three parts, published in
Galaxy, If, and Galaxy again.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1861
Not inappropriately, since the first and third episode took place
on and around Earth, and the second in a *really* different
universe.
But that wasn't a shared-world production in the usual sense,
since it was all by Asimov.
No, I read TGT in book form.
I'm talking about the Medea shared world writing project, but a
novel-length story serialized in an eighties magazine, not a short
story in the Harlan's World book.
I'm pretty sure I read the one you have in mind. If I did it would
have most likely been in either Analog or Asimov's. Both did publish
Harlan's World stories but it would take more digging than I'm in the
mood for to dig out which issue.
Chris Buckley
2018-11-30 18:09:38 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by -dsr-
Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're
thinking
Post by -dsr-
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
Could you be thinking of Asimov's _The Gods Themselves_? That
came out in 1972; it was serialized in three parts, published in
Galaxy, If, and Galaxy again.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1861
Not inappropriately, since the first and third episode took place
on and around Earth, and the second in a *really* different
universe.
But that wasn't a shared-world production in the usual sense,
since it was all by Asimov.
No, I read TGT in book form.
I'm talking about the Medea shared world writing project, but a
novel-length story serialized in an eighties magazine, not a short
story in the Harlan's World book.
I'm pretty sure I read the one you have in mind. If I did it would
have most likely been in either Analog or Asimov's. Both did publish
Harlan's World stories but it would take more digging than I'm in the
mood for to dig out which issue.
Looking at the copyright page of Harlan's World, it looks like there
were several stages of the work. The original setup was 1975, several
stories in 1978-1979 mostly in Analog, and then several stories in Omni
in 1981-1984, including the only multi-parter (Sturgeon's novelette was
about 60 pages over 3 issues).

So if there was another full novel, which I don't see any sign of, it
could have occurred anywhere in 10 years.

I have the book, but I don't remember if I ever made it to the actual stories!
I got bogged down in the factual world-building sections by the authors, which
were nice and I always meant to get back to them, but never did. The book is
a couple hundred pages of how they designed the world, followed by 300 pages
or so of stories.

Chris
Robert Woodward
2018-11-30 17:48:26 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by -dsr-
Post by -dsr-
Post by Greg Goss
There was a co-op writing project in the eighties where a number of
big-name authors put together a "writing bible" for an exotic planet,
then wrote various stories set there.
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The dominant local natives were crab like. That's about all I
remember. Well, plus a scene where a brightly lit convoy led a swarm
of solar-flare activated nasties back to base.
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
I thought that the planet was "Medusa" and the author of the novel was
Pohl. But Google is swamped by references to Basilisk and Warhammer.
I think you want Medea: Harlan's World, and the particular story you're
thinking
Post by -dsr-
of is Niven's Flare Time.
Yes, Medea for the planet, and that particular episode could well have
been the Niven.
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
Could you be thinking of Asimov's _The Gods Themselves_? That
came out in 1972; it was serialized in three parts, published in
Galaxy, If, and Galaxy again.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1861
Not inappropriately, since the first and third episode took place
on and around Earth, and the second in a *really* different
universe.
But that wasn't a shared-world production in the usual sense,
since it was all by Asimov.
No, I read TGT in book form.
I'm talking about the Medea shared world writing project, but a
novel-length story serialized in an eighties magazine, not a short
story in the Harlan's World book.
The ISFDB describes Sturgeon's contribution ("Why Dolphin's Don't Bite")
as a novella (about 60 pages in the anthology), but it was serialized
over 3 issues of Omni in 1980 (which lasted 12 more years).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Greg Goss
2018-12-01 16:28:38 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Greg Goss
But I seem to remember a full novel in the setting, stretched out to
too many pieces in a dying magazine. 1985 for the project is too late
for the death of Galaxy or Galileo, so I don't remember.
I'm talking about the Medea shared world writing project, but a
novel-length story serialized in an eighties magazine, not a short
story in the Harlan's World book.
The ISFDB describes Sturgeon's contribution ("Why Dolphin's Don't Bite")
as a novella (about 60 pages in the anthology), but it was serialized
over 3 issues of Omni in 1980 (which lasted 12 more years).
That's probably it. I read Omni at the time.

The three parter stretched to extra issues must have been some other
story. (Perhaps Ringworld Engineers in Galileo?)
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Anthony Frost
2018-12-04 12:30:50 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
"Fats", food producers, is the third bloc, though it's not the
simple mapping of todays blocs that you imply. That setting is from
"Jem" by Frederik Pohl set on another tidally locked planet round a
flare star.

Anthony
Greg Goss
2018-12-05 04:42:04 UTC
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Post by Anthony Frost
Post by Greg Goss
The planet was a "one face" in tidally locked close orbit to a dim red
dwarf. The three teams of Terrans were "Greasies" (petronations),
"Peeps" (Communist bloc) and whatever they called the West.
"Fats", food producers, is the third bloc, though it's not the
simple mapping of todays blocs that you imply. That setting is from
"Jem" by Frederik Pohl set on another tidally locked planet round a
flare star.
Thank you. Jem also fits ...
Post by Anthony Frost
One of the stories was published as a three part novel in a dying
magazine. I seem to remember that the three parter stretched to five
as part of the death throes.
The five parts of the three part novel were stretched out over 18
months with the final part in the last issue of Galaxy.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
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