Discussion:
Time Travel and Serial Killings.
(too old to reply)
Titus G
2018-06-28 03:38:08 UTC
Permalink
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot. I finished it even though I
dislike horror, enjoyed it as a novelty and cautiously recommend it,
but... but... but...
1. The horror was gruesome. Worse, it seemed gratuitous because it was
repetitive.
2. Every time a new character was introduced, the flow stopped for
another exposition.
3. Each character was introduced and described in the way I associate
with Stephen King; lists of diverse stereotypes with weird habits
(usually sexual) and many petty stereotyped worries.
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-29 20:46:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot. I finished it even though I
dislike horror, enjoyed it as a novelty and cautiously recommend it,
but... but... but...
1. The horror was gruesome. Worse, it seemed gratuitous because it was
repetitive.
2. Every time a new character was introduced, the flow stopped for
another exposition.
3. Each character was introduced and described in the way I associate
with Stephen King; lists of diverse stereotypes with weird habits
(usually sexual) and many petty stereotyped worries.
I keep doing this with films on TV - well, I think
I eventually learned better: the TV guide describes an
interesting concept, but it also describes a show as
"horror"; this means that quite soon, people will be
getting chopped up or swallowed or something else
disgusting, and I won't enjoy it.

It's the same with spicy food, which these days is labelled
with multiple chilli emoticons. With one, there's about
fifty percent probability that I won't regret the meal
due to it making my mouth hurt. More than one chilli
shown, it's zero percent.

With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Titus G
2018-07-02 04:46:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot. I finished it even though I
dislike horror, enjoyed it as a novelty and cautiously recommend it,
but... but... but...
1. The horror was gruesome. Worse, it seemed gratuitous because it was
repetitive.
2. Every time a new character was introduced, the flow stopped for
another exposition.
3. Each character was introduced and described in the way I associate
with Stephen King; lists of diverse stereotypes with weird habits
(usually sexual) and many petty stereotyped worries.
P.S. 99% of this additional information has no relevance to the plot.
Post by Robert Carnegie
I keep doing this with films on TV - well, I think
I eventually learned better: the TV guide describes an
interesting concept, but it also describes a show as
"horror"; this means that quite soon, people will be
getting chopped up or swallowed or something else
disgusting, and I won't enjoy it.
It's the same with spicy food, which these days is labelled
with multiple chilli emoticons. With one, there's about
fifty percent probability that I won't regret the meal
due to it making my mouth hurt. More than one chilli
shown, it's zero percent.
But, but, but, chilli is delicious and will never chop people up.
And who is now doing the swallowing?
Organic Chilli means no harm unlike Roast Pork Crackling and MacIntosh
Toffees both of which are also delicious but are subsidised in
supermarket chains by The Secret Society of Some Dentists.
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus. It was the sort of film that makes a
massive impact which might be lessened if details are known so will not
describe it further but will post the name if remembered. It was horror
in that it was .....can't say more. The actual killing was not the art
form as the emphasis was on the story. What a woffly reply. Someone
might recognise it?
Kevrob
2018-07-02 18:19:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot. I finished it even though I
dislike horror, enjoyed it as a novelty and cautiously recommend it,
but... but... but...
1. The horror was gruesome. Worse, it seemed gratuitous because it was
repetitive.
2. Every time a new character was introduced, the flow stopped for
another exposition.
3. Each character was introduced and described in the way I associate
with Stephen King; lists of diverse stereotypes with weird habits
(usually sexual) and many petty stereotyped worries.
P.S. 99% of this additional information has no relevance to the plot.
Post by Robert Carnegie
I keep doing this with films on TV - well, I think
I eventually learned better: the TV guide describes an
interesting concept, but it also describes a show as
"horror"; this means that quite soon, people will be
getting chopped up or swallowed or something else
disgusting, and I won't enjoy it.
It's the same with spicy food, which these days is labelled
with multiple chilli emoticons. With one, there's about
fifty percent probability that I won't regret the meal
due to it making my mouth hurt. More than one chilli
shown, it's zero percent.
But, but, but, chilli is delicious and will never chop people up.
And who is now doing the swallowing?
Organic Chilli means no harm unlike Roast Pork Crackling and MacIntosh
Toffees both of which are also delicious but are subsidised in
supermarket chains by The Secret Society of Some Dentists.
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo, based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/

Wiki article is here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)

I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.

Am I wrong?

Kevin R
Jerry Brown
2018-07-02 20:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot. I finished it even though I
dislike horror, enjoyed it as a novelty and cautiously recommend it,
but... but... but...
1. The horror was gruesome. Worse, it seemed gratuitous because it was
repetitive.
2. Every time a new character was introduced, the flow stopped for
another exposition.
3. Each character was introduced and described in the way I associate
with Stephen King; lists of diverse stereotypes with weird habits
(usually sexual) and many petty stereotyped worries.
P.S. 99% of this additional information has no relevance to the plot.
Post by Robert Carnegie
I keep doing this with films on TV - well, I think
I eventually learned better: the TV guide describes an
interesting concept, but it also describes a show as
"horror"; this means that quite soon, people will be
getting chopped up or swallowed or something else
disgusting, and I won't enjoy it.
It's the same with spicy food, which these days is labelled
with multiple chilli emoticons. With one, there's about
fifty percent probability that I won't regret the meal
due to it making my mouth hurt. More than one chilli
shown, it's zero percent.
But, but, but, chilli is delicious and will never chop people up.
And who is now doing the swallowing?
Organic Chilli means no harm unlike Roast Pork Crackling and MacIntosh
Toffees both of which are also delicious but are subsidised in
supermarket chains by The Secret Society of Some Dentists.
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo, based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
and one of the influences on the Doctor Who story "Heaven Sent", "It
Follows" being another.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Titus G
2018-07-02 22:00:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo,
based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)
I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.
Am I wrong?
No.
Thank you. The name Triangle did not ring a bell but yes, that is the
film I was writing about. I was pleased to read criticism in the
Wikipedia article that berated the film for not being true horror and I
interpret that as, (as Robert Carnegie originally said), for "the art
form" in Triangle actually telling a clever speculative story rather
than just "killing people ..... in a visually entertaining way".
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.

In films, I love being confused and puzzled by dishonest or impaired
narrators/protagonists but not so much in books. Mark Lawrence's Red
Sister where the naivety of the protagonist is necessary for the plot
stretches credibility a little because of this. Graydon Saunder's
assumption that the reader lives in the same world as his characters is
a different type of confusion creation that I find enjoyable but it
wouldn't work in a film and the film Triangle would not have had the
same impact for me had it been a book.
Greg Goss
2018-07-03 06:17:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
My late first wife detested Memento, with a passion. I liked it.

We had the (rented) DVD, and an internet site listing easter eggs. I
watched it again with the toggle switch to run it in chronological
order. She pointedly went into the other room to play on the computer.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Juho Julkunen
2018-07-03 11:23:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Titus G
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
My late first wife detested Memento, with a passion. I liked it.
We had the (rented) DVD, and an internet site listing easter eggs. I
watched it again with the toggle switch to run it in chronological
order. She pointedly went into the other room to play on the computer.
It rather does depend on its gimmick. It was interesting, once, but I
didn't think it was very good, and have no plans to see it again. How
did you find it in chronological order?
--
Juho Julkunen
Moriarty
2018-07-03 21:53:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Titus G
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
My late first wife detested Memento, with a passion. I liked it.
We had the (rented) DVD, and an internet site listing easter eggs. I
watched it again with the toggle switch to run it in chronological
order. She pointedly went into the other room to play on the computer.
It rather does depend on its gimmick. It was interesting, once, but I
didn't think it was very good, and have no plans to see it again. How
did you find it in chronological order?
Isn't the gimmick the same one Iain M Banks used for "Use of Weapons"?

-Moriarty
Titus G
2018-07-04 05:18:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Titus G
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
My late first wife detested Memento, with a passion. I liked it.
We had the (rented) DVD, and an internet site listing easter
eggs. I watched it again with the toggle switch to run it in
chronological order. She pointedly went into the other room to
play on the computer.
It rather does depend on its gimmick. It was interesting, once, but
I didn't think it was very good, and have no plans to see it again.
How did you find it in chronological order?
Isn't the gimmick the same one Iain M Banks used for "Use of
Weapons"?
I don't think so. Banks used a literary trick to enhance an already
brilliant story whereas Memento was brilliant because it was honestly
told with the perspective being distorted because of advancing illness.
That aspect was more important than the story.
D B Davis
2018-07-04 14:52:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo,
based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)
I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.
Am I wrong?
No.
Thank you. The name Triangle did not ring a bell but yes, that is the
film I was writing about. I was pleased to read criticism in the
Wikipedia article that berated the film for not being true horror and I
interpret that as, (as Robert Carnegie originally said), for "the art
form" in Triangle actually telling a clever speculative story rather
than just "killing people ..... in a visually entertaining way".
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
In films, I love being confused and puzzled by dishonest or impaired
narrators/protagonists but not so much in books. Mark Lawrence's Red
Sister where the naivety of the protagonist is necessary for the plot
stretches credibility a little because of this. Graydon Saunder's
assumption that the reader lives in the same world as his characters is
a different type of confusion creation that I find enjoyable but it
wouldn't work in a film and the film Triangle would not have had the
same impact for me had it been a book.
People who love being confused and puzzled by a movie's discombobulated
storytelling owe it to themselves to see _Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy_
(2011) and _Primer_. You probably need to either read the LeCarre novel
or watch the BBC adaptation beforehand to make sense of _Tinker_ (2011).
_Primer_ features two main characters who occupy nine separate,
distinct time lines. Think of it as nine subplots in one overarching
plot.
AFAIK the phone company uses seven digit phone numbers because
that's the optimal quantity easily stored in short term memory by most
humans. Keeping nine sub-plots in mind taxes most people's short term
memory.
The movie spends the first half hour setting the stage for what
follows. After the initial setup a scene change in the movie typically
implies a time line change.
_Dead of Night_ is a cyclical, horror film that precedes _Triangle_
by sixty-three years. The proponents of the Steady-State Universe,
Hoyle, Bondi, and Gold, watched it together back in the day. [1]

Note.

1. https://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/library/special_collections/hoyle/exhibition/bondi_and_gold/



Thank you,
--
Don
Your Name
2018-07-04 22:02:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
People who love being confused and puzzled by a movie's discombobulated
storytelling...
Should watch the TV series 'LOST' ... the bigest pile of over-hyped
garbage to ever masquarade as a sensible, planned TV series. In reality
it just complete rubbish they made up as they went along and made no
sense to anyone, not even the fools making it.
Titus G
2018-07-06 03:17:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides a
synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and other
unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in a
visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was
Dracula? Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo,
based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately trying without result to remember the
name of an absolutely brilliant horror film seen in the last
decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely based on the tale of
Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)
I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.
Am I wrong?
No. Thank you. The name Triangle did not ring a bell but yes, that
is the film I was writing about. I was pleased to read criticism in
the Wikipedia article that berated the film for not being true
horror and I interpret that as, (as Robert Carnegie originally
said), for "the art form" in Triangle actually telling a clever
speculative story rather than just "killing people ..... in a
visually entertaining way". The article also says the film was
partly inspired by the film "Memento", another favourite.
In films, I love being confused and puzzled by dishonest or
impaired narrators/protagonists but not so much in books. Mark
Lawrence's Red Sister where the naivety of the protagonist is
necessary for the plot stretches credibility a little because of
this. Graydon Saunder's assumption that the reader lives in the
same world as his characters is a different type of confusion
creation that I find enjoyable but it wouldn't work in a film and
the film Triangle would not have had the same impact for me had it
been a book.
People who love being confused and puzzled by a movie's
discombobulated storytelling owe it to themselves to see _Tinker
Tailor Soldier Spy_ (2011) and _Primer_. You probably need to either
read the LeCarre novel or watch the BBC adaptation beforehand to make
sense of _Tinker_ (2011).
I have read most of exMI5 agent Le Carre's fiction with the early Smiley
stories being my favourites. I love his writing as well as characters
and plots and have seen the 2011 film. The Night Manager was a brilliant
book but the TV series, excellent in most respects, reversed its meaning
ending up as institution-supporting propaganda with gleeful redemptive
violence, themes that do not appear in the Smiley books. I have no wish
to view another film based on his work.

_Primer_ features two main characters who
Post by D B Davis
occupy nine separate, distinct time lines. Think of it as nine
subplots in one overarching plot. AFAIK the phone company uses seven
digit phone numbers because that's the optimal quantity easily stored
in short term memory by most humans. Keeping nine sub-plots in mind
taxes most people's short term memory. The movie spends the first
half hour setting the stage for what follows. After the initial setup
a scene change in the movie typically implies a time line change.
After looking up Wikipedia, I remember watching Primer on television
years ago but had forgotten the name. (Primer 6 characters, Triangle
even more.) I lost the plot, (perhaps more than one?), but still enjoyed
the movie and later found explanatory diagrams after a web search. I
would watch this again.

Two great recommendations, thank you.
Post by D B Davis
_Dead of Night_ is a cyclical, horror film that precedes _Triangle_
by sixty-three years. The proponents of the Steady-State Universe,
Hoyle, Bondi, and Gold, watched it together back in the day. [1]
Wow! There really is nothing new. I read the Wikipedia entry. Perhaps
some idle dinosaurs once enacted something similar.
Post by D B Davis
Note.
1.
https://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/library/special_collections/hoyle/exhibition/bondi_and_gold/

Thank you,
Joe Pfeiffer
2018-07-06 04:01:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides a
synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and other
unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all. Evidently
the art form isn't in telling a story but in killing people (or
pretending to, it is just film) in a
visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was
Dracula? Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo,
based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately trying without result to remember the
name of an absolutely brilliant horror film seen in the last
decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely based on the tale of
Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)
I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.
Am I wrong?
No. Thank you. The name Triangle did not ring a bell but yes, that
is the film I was writing about. I was pleased to read criticism in
the Wikipedia article that berated the film for not being true
horror and I interpret that as, (as Robert Carnegie originally
said), for "the art form" in Triangle actually telling a clever
speculative story rather than just "killing people ..... in a
visually entertaining way". The article also says the film was
partly inspired by the film "Memento", another favourite.
In films, I love being confused and puzzled by dishonest or
impaired narrators/protagonists but not so much in books. Mark
Lawrence's Red Sister where the naivety of the protagonist is
necessary for the plot stretches credibility a little because of
this. Graydon Saunder's assumption that the reader lives in the
same world as his characters is a different type of confusion
creation that I find enjoyable but it wouldn't work in a film and
the film Triangle would not have had the same impact for me had it
been a book.
People who love being confused and puzzled by a movie's
discombobulated storytelling owe it to themselves to see _Tinker
Tailor Soldier Spy_ (2011) and _Primer_. You probably need to either
read the LeCarre novel or watch the BBC adaptation beforehand to make
sense of _Tinker_ (2011).
I have read most of exMI5 agent Le Carre's fiction with the early
Smiley stories being my favourites. I love his writing as well as
characters and plots and have seen the 2011 film. The Night Manager
was a brilliant book but the TV series, excellent in most respects,
reversed its meaning ending up as institution-supporting propaganda
with gleeful redemptive violence, themes that do not appear in the
Smiley books. I have no wish to view another film based on his work.
_Primer_ features two main characters who
Post by D B Davis
occupy nine separate, distinct time lines. Think of it as nine
subplots in one overarching plot. AFAIK the phone company uses seven
digit phone numbers because that's the optimal quantity easily stored
in short term memory by most humans. Keeping nine sub-plots in mind
taxes most people's short term memory. The movie spends the first
half hour setting the stage for what follows. After the initial setup
a scene change in the movie typically implies a time line change.
After looking up Wikipedia, I remember watching Primer on television
years ago but had forgotten the name. (Primer 6 characters, Triangle
even more.) I lost the plot, (perhaps more than one?), but still
enjoyed the movie and later found explanatory diagrams after a web
search. I would watch this again.
Two great recommendations, thank you.
I read a playscript a while back that, based on a time travel premise,
sounded like something that would be fun to direct. The timelines
turned out to be so convoluted that the script included a spreadsheet
showing how the events appeared to the different characters. Ah, no,
I'm nowhere near good enough to stage that in a way that would be
comprehensible to an audience...
Juho Julkunen
2018-07-06 12:11:55 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@pfeifferfamily.net>, ***@cs.nmsu.edu
says...
Post by Joe Pfeiffer
Post by D B Davis
_Primer_ features two main characters who
Post by D B Davis
occupy nine separate, distinct time lines. Think of it as nine
subplots in one overarching plot. AFAIK the phone company uses seven
digit phone numbers because that's the optimal quantity easily stored
in short term memory by most humans. Keeping nine sub-plots in mind
taxes most people's short term memory. The movie spends the first
half hour setting the stage for what follows. After the initial setup
a scene change in the movie typically implies a time line change.
After looking up Wikipedia, I remember watching Primer on television
years ago but had forgotten the name. (Primer 6 characters, Triangle
even more.) I lost the plot, (perhaps more than one?), but still
enjoyed the movie and later found explanatory diagrams after a web
search. I would watch this again.
Two great recommendations, thank you.
I read a playscript a while back that, based on a time travel premise,
sounded like something that would be fun to direct. The timelines
turned out to be so convoluted that the script included a spreadsheet
showing how the events appeared to the different characters. Ah, no,
I'm nowhere near good enough to stage that in a way that would be
comprehensible to an audience...
ObXkcd: https://xkcd.com/657/
--
Juho Julkunen
Ignatios Souvatzis
2018-07-11 17:29:39 UTC
Permalink
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.arts.sf.movies.]
Post by Juho Julkunen
ObXkcd: https://xkcd.com/657/
Wait. Saruman and Worntongue don't die when Isengard is flooded. They
are left to go, create their petty dictatorship in the Shire with
Lotho Sackville-Baggins being their front, and are only overthrown by
a revolt led by Frodo, Sam, Meriadoc and Peregrin when they return...
Wait. Is this one of the film adaptations he describes, and does it
deviate from the book?

-is
--
A medium apple... weighs 182 grams, yields 95 kcal, and contains no
caffeine, thus making it unsuitable for sysadmins. - Brian Kantor
Moriarty
2018-07-13 01:44:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ignatios Souvatzis
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.arts.sf.movies.]
Post by Juho Julkunen
ObXkcd: https://xkcd.com/657/
Wait. Saruman and Worntongue don't die when Isengard is flooded. They
are left to go, create their petty dictatorship in the Shire with
Lotho Sackville-Baggins being their front, and are only overthrown by
a revolt led by Frodo, Sam, Meriadoc and Peregrin when they return...
Wait. Is this one of the film adaptations he describes, and does it
deviate from the book?
Well, it IS labelled Movie Narrative Charts. So, yes and yes.

-Moriarty

Robert Carnegie
2018-07-05 23:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
Post by Robert Carnegie
With the TV films, Wikipedia or elsewhere usually provides
a synopsis describing all the characters, the deaths and
other unpleasant events, and who is responsible for it all.
Evidently the art form isn't in telling a story but in
killing people (or pretending to, it is just film) in
a visually entertaining way.
Yes. And the demise of the evil one. In the beginning was Dracula?
Many years ago, I loved the horror film Kujo
Cujo,
based on the Stephen King novel.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Titus G
and have been desperately
trying without result to remember the name of an absolutely brilliant
horror film seen in the last decade shot mainly on a yacht and loosely
based on the tale of Sisyphus.
That should be "Triangle," from 2009
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187064/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(2009_British_film)
I never saw it. It was not released in theaters in the US.
Am I wrong?
No.
Thank you. The name Triangle did not ring a bell but yes, that is the
film I was writing about. I was pleased to read criticism in the
Wikipedia article that berated the film for not being true horror and I
interpret that as, (as Robert Carnegie originally said), for "the art
form" in Triangle actually telling a clever speculative story rather
than just "killing people ..... in a visually entertaining way".
The article also says the film was partly inspired by the film
"Memento", another favourite.
More different than I expected from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_%281981_TV_series%29>

But then again -
Quadibloc
2018-07-04 04:26:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot.
There was, of course, a movie on this subject which was primarily a romance,
with the violence kept primarily off-screen. It also had a nice soundtrack.

I'm thinking of the movie "Time After Time", in which Jack the Ripper reads a
modern day newspaper, and declares that by today's standards "I'm an
amateur!"...

Ah, yes, my memory wasn't playing tricks on me, it did have the lovely Mary
Steenburgen in it...

John Savard
Kevrob
2018-07-04 04:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot.
There was, of course, a movie on this subject which was primarily a romance,
with the violence kept primarily off-screen. It also had a nice soundtrack.
I'm thinking of the movie "Time After Time", in which Jack the Ripper reads a
modern day newspaper, and declares that by today's standards "I'm an
amateur!"...
Ah, yes, my memory wasn't playing tricks on me, it did have the lovely Mary
Steenburgen in it...
...which made her casting as the lovely Clara in
"Back To The Future III" charmingly resonant.

Kevin R
Quadibloc
2018-07-04 19:56:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Quadibloc
Ah, yes, my memory wasn't playing tricks on me, it did have the lovely Mary
Steenburgen in it...
...which made her casting as the lovely Clara in
"Back To The Future III" charmingly resonant.
And, of course, she is not the record setter for this sort of thing.

In the original George Pal movie adaptation of "The Time Machine", Whit Bissel
appears as perhaps the principal member of the Time Traveller's group of house
guests.

And he had a major role in the ABC-TV Irwin Allen series, "The Time Tunnel", in
which he is General Heywood Kirk, in charge of Project Tictoc.

Then he also appeared with a major role in the 1978 Sunn Classics adaptation of
The Time Machine.

John Savard
David Johnston
2018-07-04 05:26:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Titus G
Unfortunately, it is a bait and switch Subject Title as the emphasis was
on horror in The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes with Time Travel an
interesting and essential part of the plot.
There was, of course, a movie on this subject which was primarily a romance,
with the violence kept primarily off-screen. It also had a nice soundtrack.
I'm thinking of the movie "Time After Time", in which Jack the Ripper reads a
modern day newspaper, and declares that by today's standards "I'm an
amateur!"...
Irritated me. Apparently the scriptwriters hadn't the faintest clue
what you'd read in a late 19th century paper. Jack the Ripper was
always an amateur.
Quadibloc
2018-07-04 19:49:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Quadibloc
I'm thinking of the movie "Time After Time", in which Jack the Ripper reads a
modern day newspaper, and declares that by today's standards "I'm an
amateur!"...
Irritated me. Apparently the scriptwriters hadn't the faintest clue
what you'd read in a late 19th century paper. Jack the Ripper was
always an amateur.
Interesting.

Since the serial killings of Jack the Ripper fascinated generations, I doubt
that one would have read about other, worse, serial killers commonly in "a late
19th century paper". Now, of course, he would have been an amateur compared to,
say, certain politicians - think of King Leopold and the Belgian Congo - but one
has to have attained a certain level of social awareness to make the leap needed
to make a connection.

I mean, even when I was a kid, we didn't read about school shootings every other
week. I assume things were even quieter in the Victorian era, despite its
horrifying social injustices.

John Savard
David Johnston
2018-07-04 21:34:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by David Johnston
Post by Quadibloc
I'm thinking of the movie "Time After Time", in which Jack the Ripper reads a
modern day newspaper, and declares that by today's standards "I'm an
amateur!"...
Irritated me. Apparently the scriptwriters hadn't the faintest clue
what you'd read in a late 19th century paper. Jack the Ripper was
always an amateur.
Interesting.
Since the serial killings of Jack the Ripper fascinated generations, I doubt
that one would have read about other, worse, serial killers commonly in "a late
19th century paper". Now, of course, he would have been an amateur compared to,
say, certain politicians - think of King Leopold and the Belgian Congo - but one
has to have attained a certain level of social awareness to make the leap needed
to make a connection.
I mean, even when I was a kid, we didn't read about school shootings every other
week. I assume things were even quieter in the Victorian era, despite its
horrifying social injustices.
Victorian newspapers were filled with the most lurid descriptions of
crime imaginable. They were already familiar with the principle of "If
it bleeds it leads". In fact that was how Jack's rather modest death
toll created a legend in the first place. Bear in mind that he only
really killed about five hookers, but the police investigation gave him
credit for eleven while the newspapers suggested upward of 20 victims.
There were a huge number of unsolved murders that could be ascribed to
the boogeyman.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/pleasant-thoughts-of-murder-in-the-victorian-era
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