Discussion:
Other Stories with Cold Equations Syndrome
(too old to reply)
David Johnston
2021-02-24 07:43:31 UTC
Permalink
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.

The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.

The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -

First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-24 13:25:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.

<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-24 14:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-24 16:23:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-24 18:39:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2021-02-25 01:05:48 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
My latest novel is Tom Derringer & the Steam-Powered Saurians.
See http://www.ethshar.com/StoneUnturned.shtml
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-25 01:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
The WalMartians have nothing to do with it? :-P
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-25 05:03:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No
third option. -
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
The WalMartians have nothing to do with it? :-P
My daughter calls it Mall-Wart.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-25 06:56:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No
third option. -
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
The WalMartians have nothing to do with it? :-P
My daughter calls it Mall-Wart.
Mmm, to my mind that implies that it would be one of the smaller stores
in a mall rather that being the ENTIRE mall.
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-25 14:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 14:39:34 UTC, Dimensional
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight
tolerances
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further
it can't
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that
instrumentation be
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped
population in
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No
third option. -
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they
can't detect
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
The WalMartians have nothing to do with it? :-P
My daughter calls it Mall-Wart.
Mmm, to my mind that implies that it would be one of the smaller stores
in a mall rather that being the ENTIRE mall.
I don't think she's trying to describe its physical structure;
only her opinion of it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-25 17:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 14:39:34 UTC, Dimensional
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight
tolerances
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further
it can't
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that
instrumentation be
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped
population in
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No
third option. -
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they
can't detect
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
The WalMartians have nothing to do with it? :-P
My daughter calls it Mall-Wart.
Mmm, to my mind that implies that it would be one of the smaller stores
in a mall rather that being the ENTIRE mall.
I don't think she's trying to describe its physical structure;
only her opinion of it.
I'm sorry ma'am, we are rejecting "Mall-Wart" as being insufficiently
vicious. ;)
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
J. Clarke
2021-02-25 04:28:14 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 17:05:48 -0800, Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:39:10 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
*cough*Wal-Mart*cough*
I'm uncertain what you mean by that, but if it's
"Working there may have not been a life goal",
I will reply, "Amazon".
Wal-Mart is well known for paying very poorly and importing "low cost"
items from parts of the world that pay even less. Its customers are
basically the modern Archie MacPhersons.
Which is why I avoid shopping at Wal-Mart.
Hey, Walmart had an appointment open for the COVID shot when none of
the "real" pharmacies or government-operated vaccination centers did.
At this point I got nothing bad to say about Walmart.
J. Clarke
2021-02-24 17:19:35 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 05:25:01 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
I've noted that rich do-gooders tend to get annoyed with poor people
who refuse to be angry about their poverty. People get used to what
they grow up with.
Magewolf
2021-02-24 21:30:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 05:25:01 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally
plausible from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very
implausible assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such
tight tolerances with no margin for error, that the addition of a
hundred pounds of girl will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have
the spare space that she can actually hide herself on board a one
person vessel. Further it can't have instrumentation fine tuned enough
to notice the impact on the vessel acceleration as it launches, and
yet have that instrumentation be good enough to reliably make
landings. And it requires someone on board a ship with such tight
tolerances to never have been educated in just how narrow the margins
for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices believability to make its
point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of
technocrats are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped
population in an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy
situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go
home the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't
detect that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them
have ever established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of
their home world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of how much
injustice you allow to occur out of sight because either it would put
you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable Glasgow
dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at one point on the
fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local slum living that he
gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing made by workers on
slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as moral (he's a lay officer in
church meetings) and tolerant, and working-class (he's a waiter)
dependent on tips, so his casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But
this isn't Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
I've noted that rich do-gooders tend to get annoyed with poor people who
refuse to be angry about their poverty. People get used to what they
grow up with.
But not as angry as when some of the unfortunates disagree with how they
are saving them(or even if they are saving them at all).
J. Clarke
2021-02-25 00:35:37 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 21:30:50 -0000 (UTC), Magewolf
Post by Magewolf
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 05:25:01 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally
plausible from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very
implausible assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such
tight tolerances with no margin for error, that the addition of a
hundred pounds of girl will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have
the spare space that she can actually hide herself on board a one
person vessel. Further it can't have instrumentation fine tuned enough
to notice the impact on the vessel acceleration as it launches, and
yet have that instrumentation be good enough to reliably make
landings. And it requires someone on board a ship with such tight
tolerances to never have been educated in just how narrow the margins
for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices believability to make its
point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of
technocrats are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped
population in an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy
situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go
home the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't
detect that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them
have ever established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of
their home world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of how much
injustice you allow to occur out of sight because either it would put
you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable Glasgow
dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at one point on the
fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local slum living that he
gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing made by workers on
slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as moral (he's a lay officer in
church meetings) and tolerant, and working-class (he's a waiter)
dependent on tips, so his casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But
this isn't Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
I've noted that rich do-gooders tend to get annoyed with poor people who
refuse to be angry about their poverty. People get used to what they
grow up with.
But not as angry as when some of the unfortunates disagree with how they
are saving them(or even if they are saving them at all).
And refuse to express gratitude for having their $60K+medical+pension
job replaced with SNAP+Medicaid.
Andrew McDowell
2021-02-24 20:18:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
...the big difference is that Jack London's story was totally plausible
from start to finish. The Cold Equations requires some very implausible
assumptions. For example that the vessel they have such tight tolerances
with no margin for error, that the addition of a hundred pounds of girl
will cause an unavoidable crash, and yet have the spare space that she
can actually hide herself on board a one person vessel. Further it can't
have instrumentation fine tuned enough to notice the impact on the
vessel acceleration as it launches, and yet have that instrumentation be
good enough to reliably make landings. And it requires someone on board
a ship with such tight tolerances to never have been educated in just
how narrow the margins for error are. Cold Equations sacrifices
believability to make its point.
The Marching Morons by Cyril M. Kornbluth. A small group of technocrats
are convinced to kill most of Earth's mentally handicapped population in
an elaborate and expensive manner in an Idiocracy situation.
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Leguin. Somehow a city is
kept a paradise by brutally neglecting a single small child. The only
choice the inhabitants have is accept that or just leave. No third option. -
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
"Omelas" is an abstract moral dilemma, but that is the point...
I'm not a professional critic, but I'd say it is a parable of
how much injustice you allow to occur out of sight because
either it would put you to trouble to do something about it,
or it actually benefits you.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47991/47991-h/47991-h.htm>
is an early 20th century story collection in fairly impenetrable
Glasgow dialect where Archie (Erchie) MacPherson remarks at
one point on the fairly awful and exploitative conditions of local
slum living that he gets the benefit of wearing cheaper clothing
made by workers on slum-dweller pay. Archie is portrayed as
moral (he's a lay officer in church meetings) and tolerant, and
working-class (he's a waiter) dependent on tips, so his
casual talk about slums seems odd to me. But this isn't
Charles Dickens writing, who would be more angry about it.
Readers can take it as they like.
Neil Munro also wrote the much--loved Para Handy tales. I once mentioned them in this newsgroup, because Para Handy was the skipper of a Clyde Puffer, a small tramp steamer that could almost have been a less polished and reputable version of the Solar Queen. As background for this tale, I would point out that Para Handy isn't terribly well paid or terribly well educated, but he still earns his place as hero by good sense and (when required) low cunning, and he enjoys life - he is not a Dickensian cry for political action or social reform.

I thnk the casual talk about slums should be interpreted not from the point of view of Dickens, but from the observation that the people living in these slums had moved there by choice, looking for cheap accommodation near the jobs available in the relatively prosperous city. I think the meat of the article is a down to earth comedy discussion of the merits of country and city life from the point of view of somebody who has moved to the city (but it is not above mocking Archie, who has not taken the opportunity to improve himself by visiting libraries and art galleries). I think the closing sentiment is that both country and city life are down to what you make of them -

“Whit’s true?” said the old man, wrapping the paper more carefully round his flower-pot. “Man, I’m only coddin’. Toon or country, it doesna muckle maitter if, like me, ye stay in yer ain hoose. I don’t stay in Gleska; not me! it’s only the place I mak’ my money in; I stay wi’ Jinnet.”

(I think a search through other stories confirms that Jinnet is probably Archie's wife Janet)

Family history agrees with Archie. My Father occasionally mentioned TB, and his theory that it tended to affect people who moved out to the country from the city, and so did not get immunity to it when young. Much later I found out that his Mother had died of TB when he was very young, and that she had moved from Glasgow to the country. My Father was raised in the country by his Grandmother. His brother and sisters moved back to Glasgow with their Father, who was at most a skilled labourer in Glasgow, having gone there for work during the great depression. Some of that generation moved up a social class and out of Glasgow, while others became skilled workers and stayed. At one time I had relatives living in public housing of appalling reputation (Easterhouse and Sight Hill) - the product of slum clearances. My generation and the next pursue a wide range of occupations and have a variety of accents and manners, but all are basically good and reasonably undamaged. I am really glad that I didn't grow up in Easterhouse, but my cousin who did had arguably a more successful life than I did. My Mother's brothers - in Glasgow - can probably chalk their stomach ulcers down to Helicobacter acquired there, but the deadly pestilence was TB, caught by a woman who moved out of Glasgow to the country.
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-25 03:54:38 UTC
Permalink
I would just put on record that the grandly named
"Vital Spark", Para Handy's puffer with a crew of four
with himself, was scrubbed, polished and painted
by the captain's orders any time they were in port
and without money for drinking, in which case orders
might be not properly heard.
Bill Gill
2021-02-24 14:17:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
But that is Murray Leinster's way of writing. I have been rereading a
lot of his books. A lot of them are based on artificial situations that
just couldn't happen. He was a good writer, but many of his stories are
based on wild extrapolations of how people really are.

Bill
J. Clarke
2021-02-24 17:23:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Gill
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
But that is Murray Leinster's way of writing. I have been rereading a
lot of his books. A lot of them are based on artificial situations that
just couldn't happen. He was a good writer, but many of his stories are
based on wild extrapolations of how people really are.
The "can track but can't detect being tracked" notion is well known to
submariners. Tom Clancy explains it rather well in "The Hunt For Red
October".
James Nicoll
2021-02-24 14:46:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
My memory is that it is more that the humans cannot rule out the aliens being
better at sneaking than the humans are at spotting, and the aliens are in
the same position.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Sjouke Burry
2021-02-24 22:56:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by David Johnston
First Contact By Murray Leinster creates a a problem between two ships
which only exists because inexplicably if one of them leaves to go home
the other can track them back home but for some reason they can't detect
that they are being followed. Also apparently neither of them have ever
established an outpost or colony they could go to instead of their home
world. The result is an entirely artificial dilemma.
My memory is that it is more that the humans cannot rule out the aliens being
better at sneaking than the humans are at spotting, and the aliens are in
the same position.
Yep.
And to solve it they swap ships,
Loading...