Discussion:
YASID: Nocturnal insects
(too old to reply)
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2020-03-27 21:59:59 UTC
Permalink
Someone asked if I could identify this, and I can't:

There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to ‘love the enemy’.

And yes, this is my first post to rasfw in years; I'm not sure just how many years.
t***@gmail.com
2020-03-27 23:04:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to ‘love the enemy’.
And yes, this is my first post to rasfw in years; I'm not sure just how many years.
I don't have an answer for the YASID (yet? still looking around), but:
1) Google Groups thinks you last posted here on 10/2/18.
2) Good to see you post here again - how are you doing?

Tony
m***@gmail.com
2020-03-27 23:39:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to ‘love the enemy’.
And yes, this is my first post to rasfw in years; I'm not sure just how many years.
1) Google Groups thinks you last posted here on 10/2/18.
2) Good to see you post here again - how are you doing?
Tony
October 2, 2018 sounds reasonable; we sold our house three weeks later and spent a year traveling. We're settling back down now, on Bainbridge Island, and once I get my desk computer running again I may get back to participating regularly.

Or I may not, you never know.

Anyway, we're fine.
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-28 00:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to ‘love the enemy’.
And yes, this is my first post to rasfw in years; I'm not sure just how many years.
Sounds vaguely like an Alan Dean Foster book. But I do not remember the
space suit.
https://www.amazon.com/Midworld-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345310179/

Lynn
Chris Buckley
2020-03-28 14:56:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to ‘love the enemy’.
And yes, this is my first post to rasfw in years; I'm not sure just how many years.
Sounds vaguely like an Alan Dean Foster book. But I do not remember the
space suit.
https://www.amazon.com/Midworld-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345310179/
Lynn
I know I've read it some place, and it's some place that I've even re-read
it. But I can't find it!! So far I've eliminated _Midworld_, _DeathWorld_,
and _Threshhold_, all of which have telepathic animals.

Chris
Bo Lindbergh
2020-03-28 14:56:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
The moment he fears or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly thoughts toward them, they go away.
This part sounds like Harrison's _Deathworld_. Maybe the querist made
an unintentional mental mash-up of that and something else?

Also: welcome back!


/Bo Lindbergh
Stephen Harker
2020-03-28 19:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because
swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety
as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves
are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He
starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are
actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is
intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears
or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly
thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to
‘love the enemy’.
It is _The Asa Rule_ by Jay Williams which I have in *The Best from
Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sixth series*, edited by Anthony Boucher.

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57732
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
was: http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
now: http://members.iinet.net.au/~***@netspace.net.au/
or: http://members.iinet.net.au/~sjharker_nbn/
Chris Buckley
2020-03-28 21:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen Harker
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because
swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety
as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves
are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He
starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are
actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is
intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears
or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly
thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to
‘love the enemy’.
It is _The Asa Rule_ by Jay Williams which I have in *The Best from
Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sixth series*, edited by Anthony Boucher.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57732
That is definitely the story I am remembering; I just re-read it (in
the same collection as Stephen). The description is not quite
accurate, but very close - there is no space suit and the planet is
Mars. The main character is tied to a tree after dark (by the natives
for spying on them). He is resigned to death, but looking at the widgets
(insects) he decides they are cute, and they disappear. Then
"First I concentrated on hating them, and inside of two minutes
they had come back. And once they arrived and began humming around my
face, I thought how owlish and amusing they looked and what nice pets
they'd make. Away they went again. I did it half a dozen times."

Thank you, Stephen. That had been "bugging" me ever since Lawrence had
asked about it. I had checked half a dozen more well known anthologies
with no results - I would have had to check another 30-40 before I got
down to that one!

Chris
D B Davis
2020-03-29 01:34:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Stephen Harker
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because
swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety
as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves
are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He
starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are
actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is
intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears
or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly
thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to
‘love the enemy’.
It is _The Asa Rule_ by Jay Williams which I have in *The Best from
Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sixth series*, edited by Anthony Boucher.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57732
That is definitely the story I am remembering; I just re-read it (in
the same collection as Stephen). The description is not quite
accurate, but very close - there is no space suit and the planet is
Mars. The main character is tied to a tree after dark (by the natives
for spying on them). He is resigned to death, but looking at the widgets
(insects) he decides they are cute, and they disappear. Then
"First I concentrated on hating them, and inside of two minutes
they had come back. And once they arrived and began humming around my
face, I thought how owlish and amusing they looked and what nice pets
they'd make. Away they went again. I did it half a dozen times."
Thank you, Stephen. That had been "bugging" me ever since Lawrence had
asked about it. I had checked half a dozen more well known anthologies
with no results - I would have had to check another 30-40 before I got
down to that one!
This short appears in my June 1956 edition of F&SF. Not a spacesuit, per
se, but there are plastic suits in Lenard and Lucy's widget packs.

Here's how "love your enemies" works in practice:

contrary to the custom of war, these bloodthirsty barbarians
spared them, and spared them for Christ's sake, whether this
mercy was actually shown in promiscuous places, or in those
places specially dedicated to Christ's name, and of which
the very largest were selected as sanctuaries, that full
scope might thus be given to the expansive compassion which
desired that a large multitude might find shelter there.

_City of God_ (St Augustine)
http://www.geraldschlabach.net/city-of-god/#1.1



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Stephen Harker
2020-03-29 07:54:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Stephen Harker
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because
swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety
as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves
are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He
starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are
actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is
intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears
or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly
thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to
‘love the enemy’.
It is _The Asa Rule_ by Jay Williams which I have in *The Best from
Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sixth series*, edited by Anthony Boucher.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57732
That is definitely the story I am remembering; I just re-read it (in
the same collection as Stephen). The description is not quite
accurate, but very close - there is no space suit and the planet is
Mars. The main character is tied to a tree after dark (by the natives
for spying on them). He is resigned to death, but looking at the widgets
(insects) he decides they are cute, and they disappear. Then
Good point, I did not re-read the story very much. So, it is close but
no cigar. It could be the person who asked Lawrence mis-remembered.
But the detail is too different.

I am afraid I read the story, thought _The Asa Rule_, looked it up in
ISFDB to check which correction it was in and looked at the end bit of
the story. I did not check sufficiently carefully.
Post by Chris Buckley
Thank you, Stephen. That had been "bugging" me ever since Lawrence had
asked about it. I had checked half a dozen more well known anthologies
with no results - I would have had to check another 30-40 before I got
down to that one!
Remembering a title allowed me to short circuit the process.
Unfortunately it is likely the wrong answer.
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
was: http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
now: http://members.iinet.net.au/~***@netspace.net.au/
or: http://members.iinet.net.au/~sjharker_nbn/
Chris Buckley
2020-03-29 14:21:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen Harker
Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Stephen Harker
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
There is a planet where humans dare not venture out at sundown because
swarms of insects blanket and kill them. Everyone rushes in to safety
as light fades. The hero gets caught outside and his space suit valves
are clogged with the insects and he accepts that he is a goner. He
starts looking and the insects through his visor and thinks they are
actually quite cute. The moment he does this, they vanish. He is
intrigued and repeats the experiment a few times. The moment he fears
or dislikes them the insects return. The moment he has loving/friendly
thoughts toward them, they go away. So the trick to being safe is to
‘love the enemy’.
It is _The Asa Rule_ by Jay Williams which I have in *The Best from
Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sixth series*, edited by Anthony Boucher.
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?57732
That is definitely the story I am remembering; I just re-read it (in
the same collection as Stephen). The description is not quite
accurate, but very close - there is no space suit and the planet is
Mars. The main character is tied to a tree after dark (by the natives
for spying on them). He is resigned to death, but looking at the widgets
(insects) he decides they are cute, and they disappear. Then
Good point, I did not re-read the story very much. So, it is close but
no cigar. It could be the person who asked Lawrence mis-remembered.
But the detail is too different.
I am afraid I read the story, thought _The Asa Rule_, looked it up in
ISFDB to check which correction it was in and looked at the end bit of
the story. I did not check sufficiently carefully.
Post by Chris Buckley
Thank you, Stephen. That had been "bugging" me ever since Lawrence had
asked about it. I had checked half a dozen more well known anthologies
with no results - I would have had to check another 30-40 before I got
down to that one!
Remembering a title allowed me to short circuit the process.
Unfortunately it is likely the wrong answer.
I disagree; it's undoubtedly the right answer. That's why I quoted
the passage that I did, after saying there were differences. It
agrees too precisely with what was wanted to be chance (plus the
explicit use of "cute" earlier that I didn't quote.) As far as historical
matches of YASID requests go, this is an extremely close match of a detailed
request. Good job!

Chris
k***@outlook.com
2020-03-29 00:16:23 UTC
Permalink
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill them by nightfall.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-29 00:28:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.

Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Paul S Person
2020-03-29 17:12:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.

They had cockroaches as big as his hand.

And what does a cockroach that size eat?

Whatever it wants to.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-30 17:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ? Just grinding plates ?

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2020-03-30 20:28:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-30 21:09:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
https://dilbert.com/strip/2003-10-17
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Woodward
2020-03-31 04:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Paul S Person
2020-03-31 16:52:36 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.

The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
J. Clarke
2020-03-31 21:18:25 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-31 21:41:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-31 21:55:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
I took it as the mosquito insect in Elmendorf AFB is HUGE.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2020-03-31 22:41:35 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 16:55:43 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of
years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
I took it as the mosquito insect in Elmendorf AFB is HUGE.
Elmendorf is outside Anchorage, Alaska. Mosquitos in Alaska are
reputed to come in 4, 6, and 8 engine varieties.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-31 22:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 16:55:43 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She
said that
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't
rescued right
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects
would kill
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of
years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
I took it as the mosquito insect in Elmendorf AFB is HUGE.
Elmendorf is outside Anchorage, Alaska. Mosquitos in Alaska are
reputed to come in 4, 6, and 8 engine varieties.
I have heard mighty tales of the mighty mosquitoes of Alaska.
That they drink jet fuel, I'm not so sure.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2020-04-01 00:26:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 16:55:43 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She
said that
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't
rescued right
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects
would kill
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of
years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
I took it as the mosquito insect in Elmendorf AFB is HUGE.
Elmendorf is outside Anchorage, Alaska. Mosquitos in Alaska are
reputed to come in 4, 6, and 8 engine varieties.
I have heard mighty tales of the mighty mosquitoes of Alaska.
That they drink jet fuel, I'm not so sure.
It helps them get up to speed to skewer moose.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Dimensional Traveler
2020-04-01 00:25:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:52:36 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:45:50 -0700, Robert Woodward
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ?  Just grinding plates ?
Like those tunnel boring machines that will chew thru anything? ;)
Except for a steel pipe,
Post by Dimensional Traveler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_(tunnel_boring_machine)>
That was informative: I didn't realize the bozos-in-charge of Bertha
admitted that they knew about the pipe before they started. That
should kill their lawsuit, with any luck.
The original point was, of course, the /size/ of insects in the Canal
Zone. And, therefore, the amount of damage they could do.
Then there was the mosquito that landed at Elmendorf AFB, and they
pumped 500 gallons of JP5 into it before the realized that wasn't a
B-52.
Hm, at first I thought you were talking about an insect, and
later realized it was more likely you were talking about the WWII
aircraft. And I'm willing to believe it couldn't run on jet
fuel.
Elmendorf AFB is in Alaska (near Anchorage). There is a long running
joke that the mosquito is the Alaska state bird.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
J. Clarke
2020-03-30 21:46:51 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 12:28:32 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ? Just grinding plates ?
They are insects, their eating apparatus is not designed like
mammalian eating apparatus.
Paul S Person
2020-03-31 16:53:29 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 17:46:51 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 30 Mar 2020 12:28:32 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by k***@outlook.com
My friend Ruth Reilly was in the canal zone during WWII. She said that
if a plane went down in the jungle, and the pilot wasn't rescued right
away, they would give up, because it was assumed the insects would kill
them by nightfall.
That seems odd, as the Canal Zone has been inhabited for thousands of years.
Sure, yellow fever & malaria, but those are not overnight things..
I once knew a guy who had been stationed in the Canal Zone.
They had cockroaches as big as his hand.
And what does a cockroach that size eat?
Whatever it wants to.
But they do not have teeth ? Just grinding plates ?
They are insects, their eating apparatus is not designed like
mammalian eating apparatus.
The amazingly entertaining film /Them!/ explores this point.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
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