Discussion:
[translation] Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi
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James Nicoll
2021-08-11 13:28:43 UTC
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Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi

https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/one-step-closer
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
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Kevrob
2021-08-15 15:21:21 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/one-step-closer
--
Why use the name "Mao?" I understand this is a Japanese
name, and I have no idea how, if at all, it relates to the infamous
Chinese one?

[sarc]

Were "Hitler" and "Stalin" taken?

[/sarc]
--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-08-15 16:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by James Nicoll
Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/one-step-closer
--
Why use the name "Mao?" I understand this is a Japanese
name, and I have no idea how, if at all, it relates to the infamous
Chinese one?
[sarc]
Were "Hitler" and "Stalin" taken?
[/sarc]
[nitpick]

"Hitler" was "Hiedler" back in the days of Adolf's grandfather.
And "Stalin" is an ekename, meaning "man of steel," applied to a
Georgian whose name at birth was Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili.

[/nitpick]

I know neither Japanese nor Chinese. But I recall being told
(way back in my Linguistics major) that (a) Japanese has many
Chinese loanwords, and (b) the word for "cat" in Chinese is also
_mao_, though with different tones than the name of the Chairman.

Which means the two words are as different, to a speaker of
Chinese, as "pat" and "bat."

And reading James's review, I observe that Mao is one who was
cursed by a *cat-demon.*

Do we have any speakers of Japanese here, or anyone who knows a
speaker of Japanese, who might be able to clarify whether Mao in
this story means "cat" or "Chinese guy from the twentieth
century"?

As to Takahashi's style of drawing, Wikipedia tells me she's 63.

Possibly her hands are weakening? (I hope not; but mine are
degenerating to the point that my handwriting is illegible to me.
I can still print, slowly and carefully.) Let's hope that she
just decided to use a simpler style.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Michael Ikeda
2021-08-16 00:08:16 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by Kevrob
Post by James Nicoll
Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/one-step-closer
--
Why use the name "Mao?" I understand this is a Japanese
name, and I have no idea how, if at all, it relates to the
infamous Chinese one?
[sarc]
Were "Hitler" and "Stalin" taken?
[/sarc]
[nitpick]
"Hitler" was "Hiedler" back in the days of Adolf's grandfather.
And "Stalin" is an ekename, meaning "man of steel," applied to a
Georgian whose name at birth was Ioseb Besarionis dze
Jughashvili.
[/nitpick]
I know neither Japanese nor Chinese. But I recall being told
(way back in my Linguistics major) that (a) Japanese has many
Chinese loanwords, and (b) the word for "cat" in Chinese is also
_mao_, though with different tones than the name of the
Chairman.
Which means the two words are as different, to a speaker of
Chinese, as "pat" and "bat."
And reading James's review, I observe that Mao is one who was
cursed by a *cat-demon.*
Do we have any speakers of Japanese here, or anyone who knows a
speaker of Japanese, who might be able to clarify whether Mao in
this story means "cat" or "Chinese guy from the twentieth
century"?
Possibly neither. Based on the relevant Wikipedia page (Mao (given
name)) (in the category Japanese feminine given names), Mao seems
to be a reasonably common Japanese given name (usually female,
although at least one of the persons listed with the name is male).
Or more accurately, it appears that there are several different
Japanese given names that transliterate to "Mao". The meaning of
the name is listed as "Different meanings depending on the kanji
used". And it is clear from the examples given for people with the
name that there are several different sets of characters that could
correspond to "Mao".
Quadibloc
2021-08-16 10:13:24 UTC
Permalink
Possibly neither. Based on the relevant Wikipedia page (Mao (given
name)) (in the category Japanese feminine given names), Mao seems
to be a reasonably common Japanese given name (usually female,
although at least one of the persons listed with the name is male).
The girl's name is Nanoka. Mao, the immortal exorcist, is male.

But you are indeed quite correct on the main point: _since_ Mao is
a common Japanese name, to Japanese people "Mao" won't
automatically mean "Mao Tse-Tung", the mass-murdering Chinese
dictator, the way it would to a typical American, and, therefore,
nothing particularly odd should be inferred.

Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
No ulterior motive whatever need be suspected.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-08-16 13:07:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Possibly neither. Based on the relevant Wikipedia page (Mao (given
name)) (in the category Japanese feminine given names), Mao seems
to be a reasonably common Japanese given name (usually female,
although at least one of the persons listed with the name is male).
The girl's name is Nanoka. Mao, the immortal exorcist, is male.
But you are indeed quite correct on the main point: _since_ Mao is
a common Japanese name, to Japanese people "Mao" won't
automatically mean "Mao Tse-Tung", the mass-murdering Chinese
dictator, the way it would to a typical American, and, therefore,
nothing particularly odd should be inferred.
Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
No ulterior motive whatever need be suspected.
All right!

Not having read the work, I can only speculate that a cat-demon
is not the worst of demons to be possessed by. I have two little
cat-demons of my own. Dark they are, and golden-eyed.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2021-08-16 16:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Possibly neither. Based on the relevant Wikipedia page (Mao (given
name)) (in the category Japanese feminine given names), Mao seems
to be a reasonably common Japanese given name (usually female,
although at least one of the persons listed with the name is male).
The girl's name is Nanoka. Mao, the immortal exorcist, is male.
But you are indeed quite correct on the main point: _since_ Mao is
a common Japanese name, to Japanese people "Mao" won't
automatically mean "Mao Tse-Tung", the mass-murdering Chinese
dictator, the way it would to a typical American, and, therefore,
nothing particularly odd should be inferred.
Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
No ulterior motive whatever need be suspected.
All your cats are belong to us. :-)
Christian Weisgerber
2021-08-16 17:50:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
Actually, "neko" (ネコ, 猫) is the Japanese word for cat.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
James Nicoll
2021-08-16 20:12:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
Actually, "neko" (ネコ, 猫) is the Japanese word for cat.
A source of great humour to my grandfather Nicoll's Japanese landlady in Boston,
once she discovered stray cats tendency to seek him out for food and scritches.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
David Johnston
2021-08-30 18:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Possibly neither. Based on the relevant Wikipedia page (Mao (given
name)) (in the category Japanese feminine given names), Mao seems
to be a reasonably common Japanese given name (usually female,
although at least one of the persons listed with the name is male).
The girl's name is Nanoka. Mao, the immortal exorcist, is male.
But you are indeed quite correct on the main point: _since_ Mao is
a common Japanese name, to Japanese people "Mao" won't
automatically mean "Mao Tse-Tung", the mass-murdering Chinese
dictator, the way it would to a typical American, and, therefore,
nothing particularly odd should be inferred.
Particularly, as was also noted in this thread, "Mao" is the Japanese
word for cat, and the immortal exorcist is posessed by a cat-demon.
No ulterior motive whatever need be suspected.
It doesn't mean "cat" in Japanese. What it actually means depends on
the character used to write it. It does mean "cat" in Chinese...once
again depending on the character used to write it. It could be a
bilingual pun.

Michael F. Stemper
2021-08-16 18:46:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by James Nicoll
Mao, volume 1 by Rumiko Takahashi
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/one-step-closer
--
Why use the name "Mao?" I understand this is a Japanese
name, and I have no idea how, if at all, it relates to the infamous
Chinese one?
[sarc]
Were "Hitler" and "Stalin" taken?
[/sarc]
[nitpick]
"Hitler" was "Hiedler" back in the days of Adolf's grandfather.
And "Stalin" is an ekename, meaning "man of steel," applied to a
Georgian whose name at birth was Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili.
[/nitpick]
This was one of the reasons that the "higher critic" rejected a history
of the twentieth century in "Letter from a Higher Critic". The name
"Stalin" was just too appropriate, so it must have been made up by the
soi-disant historian.

<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?45523>
--
Michael F. Stemper
You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him talk like Mr. Ed
by rubbing peanut butter on his gums.
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