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"Infographic: United States of Oil"
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Lynn McGuire
2019-11-21 21:39:25 UTC
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"Infographic: United States of Oil"

https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil

"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."

"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."

"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."

"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"

I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.

Lynn
Kevrob
2019-11-21 22:12:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Ayn Rand had an oil shale magnate in Colorado in
"Atlas Shrugged" - Ellis Wyatt.

His tech reminds one more of fracking for natural gas, though.

http://thepolitic.org/hydrofracking-picking-up-steam/

Kevin R
Robert Carnegie
2019-11-21 23:01:10 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
Juho Julkunen
2019-11-21 23:12:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn?t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states?Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico?together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That?s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation?s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado?s oil production surpassed California?s starting in 2018. As
?fracking? continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
_Subspace Explorers_?
--
Juho Julkunen
Robert Woodward
2019-11-22 05:58:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of
-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn?t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states?Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico?together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That?s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation?s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado?s oil production surpassed California?s starting in 2018. As
?fracking? continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
_Subspace Explorers_?
I believe so (I consider that to be a worse book than _The Galactic
Primes_).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Juho Julkunen
2019-11-22 13:14:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Carnegie
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
_Subspace Explorers_?
I believe so (I consider that to be a worse book than _The Galactic
Primes_).
Wow, shots fired. I really don't think he has a worse book than _The
Galaxy Primes_, but it's been a while since I read _Subspace
Explorers_.
--
Juho Julkunen
Robert Woodward
2019-11-23 05:57:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Carnegie
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
_Subspace Explorers_?
I believe so (I consider that to be a worse book than _The Galactic
Primes_).
Wow, shots fired. I really don't think he has a worse book than _The
Galaxy Primes_, but it's been a while since I read _Subspace
Explorers_.
YMMV of course. I will freely admit that _The Galactic Primes_ wasn't
good; but I view _Subspace Explorers_ as an inferior copy of _First
Lensman_ (and that wasn't very good to begin with).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Robert Carnegie
2019-11-23 09:16:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Carnegie
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
_Subspace Explorers_?
I believe so (I consider that to be a worse book than _The Galactic
Primes_).
Wow, shots fired. I really don't think he has a worse book than _The
Galaxy Primes_, but it's been a while since I read _Subspace
Explorers_.
YMMV of course. I will freely admit that _The Galactic Primes_ wasn't
good; but I view _Subspace Explorers_ as an inferior copy of _First
Lensman_ (and that wasn't very good to begin with).
I believe I remember enjoying each, at quite a young age.
Perhaps I wouldn't now. But, there was sex, and nudity.
The latter quite early in _Subspace Explorers_, due to
decontamination from a space radiation incident.
I remember that...
Lynn McGuire
2019-11-22 00:23:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
Wow, that sounds ... inefficient.

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2019-11-22 15:20:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
Wow, that sounds ... inefficient.
Really? Just compress and freeze portions of Titan's hydrocarbons and
sling them towards earth orbit like big frozen ice cubes. Catch them as they approach.
Lynn McGuire
2019-11-23 03:16:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Right now I've forgotten which of E. E. "Doc" Smith's
novels had - I think - oil imported to Earth from
other planets.
Wow, that sounds ... inefficient.
Really? Just compress and freeze portions of Titan's hydrocarbons and
sling them towards earth orbit like big frozen ice cubes. Catch them as they approach.
HEADS UP ! ! ! INCOMING FIREBALL ! ! ! !

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2019-11-21 23:25:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/americas-great-shale-oil-boom-is-nearly-over/2019/10/13/31650cde-ed87-11e9-a329-7378fbfa1b63_story.html
Lynn McGuire
2019-11-22 00:21:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/americas-great-shale-oil-boom-is-nearly-over/2019/10/13/31650cde-ed87-11e9-a329-7378fbfa1b63_story.html
Yup, the wildcatters are going bust. Exxon and Shell are buying the
pieces in the firesales. Sadly, this has happened many times before and
will happen again.

The big problem now is getting the natural gas to the markets from the
wells. We are adding new pipelines as fast as the regulators allow them
to proceed. About half of the natural gas in the USA is being flared
since no demand or no ability to get it to market.

Lynn
Kevrob
2019-11-22 10:11:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/americas-great-shale-oil-boom-is-nearly-over/2019/10/13/31650cde-ed87-11e9-a329-7378fbfa1b63_story.html
Yup, the wildcatters are going bust. Exxon and Shell are buying the
pieces in the firesales. Sadly, this has happened many times before and
will happen again.
The big problem now is getting the natural gas to the markets from the
wells. We are adding new pipelines as fast as the regulators allow them
to proceed. About half of the natural gas in the USA is being flared
since no demand or no ability to get it to market.
TL:DR version?

When prices drop, producers with higher costs get hurt more
than low cost producers do.

https://outline.com/fB5StH

Kevin R
Scott Lurndal
2019-11-21 23:25:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
and https://www.npr.org/2019/11/20/780879474/as-oil-prices-drop-and-money-dries-up-is-the-u-s-shale-boom-going-bust
William Hyde
2019-11-22 20:46:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in this group in the mid-1990s. Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.

William Hyde
Lynn McGuire
2019-11-23 03:17:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in this group in the mid-1990s. Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved. In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.

Lynn
Gary R. Schmidt
2019-11-23 09:46:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
When men talk to their friends, they insult each other.
They don't really mean it.
When women talk to their friends, they compliment each other.
They don't mean it either.
James Nicoll
2019-11-23 13:26:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Dimensional Traveler
2019-11-23 17:59:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
I think we can limit the damage to just Texas. That way no one would
notice the difference.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Paul S Person
2019-11-23 18:34:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“frackingâ€? continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
The film /Slaughterhouse Rulez/ explores the cost.

Warning: if you see it, you may never look at fracking the same way
again.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2019-11-23 21:28:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
Like you, I live elsewhere.

British satire magazine _Private Eye_ seems to consider
its audience hypocritical for objecting to domestic
fracking trials whose effects started with small-ish
earthquakes and looked like ending with the ground
beneath our feet evaporating, but accepting fuel
imported from performing this process in America
instead. Sometimes I just don't see what they are
getting at.
James Nicoll
2019-11-24 00:54:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July
2019, some 78
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in
2018.  As
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
Like you, I live elsewhere.
British satire magazine _Private Eye_ seems to consider
its audience hypocritical for objecting to domestic
fracking trials whose effects started with small-ish
earthquakes and looked like ending with the ground
beneath our feet evaporating, but accepting fuel
imported from performing this process in America
instead. Sometimes I just don't see what they are
getting at.
If the oceans rise significantly a lot of the UK will
be underwater so why not use what we can of it now?
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
William Hyde
2019-11-24 19:58:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July
2019, some 78
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in
2018.  As
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.
People used to talk about "when the shale oil problem is solved" in
this group in the mid-1990s.  Terry, in serious mode, was one of them.
William Hyde
Well, the shale oil problem has been solved.  In many ways as fracking
is an art, not a science.
More of a total fucking disaster than either, really.
If the cost of cheap energy is rendering vast swaths of the US
uninhabitable, I am comfortable paying it. In fact, I'd go so far
as to permit a certain level of radioactivity as long as it didn't
end up in the fuel. Prosperity demands sacrifices.
Like you, I live elsewhere.
British satire magazine _Private Eye_ seems to consider
its audience hypocritical for objecting to domestic
fracking trials whose effects started with small-ish
earthquakes and looked like ending with the ground
beneath our feet evaporating, but accepting fuel
imported from performing this process in America
instead. Sometimes I just don't see what they are
getting at.
If the oceans rise significantly a lot of the UK will
be underwater so why not use what we can of it now?
Because once the sea rises, England will no longer need to be jealous of Scotland's offshore oil.

Peace and Harmony will reign.

William Hyde
p***@hotmail.com
2019-11-25 04:04:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000. But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights. According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however. Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total. That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years. In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018. As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this. I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA. We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA. We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA. These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
James Blish described something very much like fracking in his _Cities in Flight_ stories.
From the 1953 novelette version of _Earthman Come Home_:

“Sink two more shafts,” Amalfi said. “We'll pressure jellied gasoline into it and split it.
Ride along a Number Eleven gravel to hold the seam open. You’ve got an oil-bearing till
down there, anyhow. If there’s no dome we’ll boil the oil out.”

Peter Wezeman
Anti-social Darwinist
Lynn McGuire
2019-11-25 21:02:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Infographic: United States of Oil"
https://www.asme.org/topics-resources/content/infographic-united-states-of-oil
"Petroleum production in the U.S. has skyrocketed since 2000.  But just
six states account for more than three-quarters of that oil."
"Some revolutions come in with a roar, while others are whisper quiet.
But you would be excused if you didn’t realize that the U.S. oil
industry had soared to never-before-seen heights.  According to the U.S.
Department of Energy, which keeps track of petroleum production, more
than 12 million barrels of oil per day were produced in the United
States from April through June 2019."
"Not every state can take credit for that record, however.  Six
states—Texas, Alaska, California, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New
Mexico—together produced 9.2 million barrels a day in July 2019, some 78
percent of the national total.  That’s been a consistent trend for
decades, as those six states cumulatively produced 73 percent of the
nation’s oil since January 2000."
"While North Dakota, Oklahoma, and New Mexico are newly booming thanks
to hydraulic fracturing technology, and Texas is a world of its own (it
produces more than 40 percent of the national total), Alaska and
California have declined considerably in the past 20 years.  In fact,
Colorado’s oil production surpassed California’s starting in 2018.  As
“fracking” continues to revolutionize the petroleum industry, more
states may rise toward the top of the oil charts"
I do not know of a single futurist or science fiction writer who
predicted this.  I have been totally shocked at the amount of energy
available for the present and the future in the USA.  We basically have
about 200 years of crude oil reserves in the USA.  We have about 1,000
years of natural gas reserves in the USA.  These are based on the two
technologies of directional drilling and fracking which came about in
the late 1990s.
Lynn
Bummer, no one disputed my contention. Of course, futurists and science
fiction writers tend to be a rather gloomy lot.

Lynn

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