Discussion:
Enid Blyton's 50th death anniversary today
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l***@yahoo.com
2018-11-28 15:53:52 UTC
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I have to say that I never read much of her work, as a kid, since she was never that popular in the US. However, one 1940s anthology in my school had two of her stories that I enjoyed somewhat - "Lost – A Very Good Temper" and "The Yellow Wishing-Cap." Read more about that anthology here - it has multiple authors, including Kipling, Barrie, Lear, and Lewis Carroll. There's also a story about the fictional UK female WWII pilot, Worrals.

http://www.loganberrybooks.com/solved-c.html
(Scroll down to "Children's Gift Book" - about half-way.)


https://www.enidblyton.co.uk/

https://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/chronology.php

https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/enid-blyton-books-best-series-famous-five-secret-seven-faraway-tree-stories-a8642836.html

First paragraphs:

Joe Sommerlad, Nov. 27th, 2018

Enid Blyton, the popular children’s writer, died 50 years ago this week.

Astonishingly prolific, the author composed some 700 books between 1922, when she published her poetry collection Child Whispers, and her death in Hampstead on 28 November 1968, often rattling out 6,000 words a day at the typewriter.

She has sold more than 600 million books, which have never gone out of print, been translated into 90 languages and enjoyed a loyal following among young readers for generations, her characters from the Famous Five to Noddy capturing the imagination and inspiring a taste for adventure.

But Blyton has also been heavily criticised. The BBC refused to dramatise her output during her lifetime on the grounds she was a “second-rater”, while she has been derided for the patriarchal assumptions, snobbery and xenophobia evident in her novels and mocked as a conservative relic of a Britain that no longer exists.

And yet she endures. Her tales of youthful pluck and outdoor picnics with lashings of ginger beer might have seemed comically outmoded by the Swinging Sixties but are now read in a spirit of enormous nostalgia for mid-century Britain, the values of friendship, fairness and freedom she espoused appealing to audiences anew in more self-centred times.

Her memory has also been coloured somewhat by A Childhood at Green Hedges, the scathing memoir her daughter Imogen Smallwood wrote in 1989 in which she states: “The truth is, Enid Blyton was arrogant, insecure, pretentious, very skilled at putting difficult or unpleasant things out of her mind, and without a trace of maternal instinct. As a child, I viewed her as a rather strict authority. As an adult, I did not hate her. I pitied her.”

Imogen's daughter Sophie, Enid's granddaughter, offered a kinder assessment of Blyton’s work in 2009, telling The Guardian: “Her writing is that of an intelligent 12-year-old. In my view that’s why adults find it difficult to relate to her because she doesn’t quite have the depth; it has that childlike quality.”

Former Children’s Laureate Anne Fine has also defended her, telling BBC Radio 4 in 2008: “In times of falling reading levels and limitless other distractions, we grasp at any author who has that turn-the-page quality. And for reasons that may remain entirely mysterious to reading adults, she certainly has that.”...


https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/enid-blyton-50-years-anniversary-death-legacy-childrens-books-author-a8648281.html

By Ceri Radford, Nov. 27th

"Enid Blyton 50 years on: Let’s be more critical about books venerated in the past"

Excerpts:

...While golliwogs – a racial caricature of a toy – were dropped from a 1980s BBC adaptation of Noddy, and two of the Famous Five, Fanny and Dick, have been astutely renamed, what is harder to eradicate is a general sense of smug judgement. Blyton’s books take a snide tone towards anyone who isn’t part of the jolly-hockey-sticks, stiff-upper-lip club. Take this early scene from First Term at Malory Towers, when a much-praised boarding school teacher meets an upset new girl: “Miss Potts looked at Gwendoline. She had already sized her up and knew her to be a spoiled only child, selfish and difficult to handle at first.”

You can’t blame Blyton for capturing a zeitgeist long before the existence of emotional support peacocks, but you can wonder at the enduring popularity of a writer who apparently set such little stock in empathy, the real cornerstone of imagination.

Blyton remains a bestselling author, raising the question: who buys them? Is it all Jacob Rees-Mogg having a laugh, feverishly dragging them into his shopping cart and cackling as he gets one over on golliwog-shunning millennial snowflakes?

While Blyton has an undeniable knack for crafting a tale, so do many writers...

(snip)


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/11/28/enid-blyton-taught-female-friendship/

"What Enid Blyton taught me about female friendship" by Gwen Smith

(you have to subscribe)

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6074615/The-inside-story-best-seling-childrens-author-Enid-Blyton.html

(about her life - I don't know how close to accurate it is)



Lenona.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-11-28 17:57:29 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
I have to say that I never read much of her work, as a kid, since she
was never that popular in the US. However, one 1940s anthology in my
school had two of her stories that I enjoyed somewhat - "Lost – A Very
Good Temper" and "The Yellow Wishing-Cap." Read more about that
anthology here - it has multiple authors, including Kipling, Barrie,
Lear, and Lewis Carroll. There's also a story about the fictional UK
female WWII pilot, Worrals.
http://www.loganberrybooks.com/solved-c.html
(Scroll down to "Children's Gift Book" - about half-way.)
https://www.enidblyton.co.uk/
https://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/chronology.php
https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/enid-blyton-books-best-series-famous-five-secret-seven-faraway-tree-stories-a8642836.html
Joe Sommerlad, Nov. 27th, 2018
Enid Blyton, the popular children’s writer, died 50 years ago this week.
Astonishingly prolific, the author composed some 700 books between 1922,
when she published her poetry collection Child Whispers, and her death
in Hampstead on 28 November 1968, often rattling out 6,000 words a day
at the typewriter.
She has sold more than 600 million books, which have never gone out of
print, been translated into 90 languages and enjoyed a loyal following
among young readers for generations, her characters from the Famous Five
to Noddy capturing the imagination and inspiring a taste for adventure.
But Blyton has also been heavily criticised. The BBC refused to
dramatise her output during her lifetime on the grounds she was a
“second-rater”, while she has been derided for the patriarchal
assumptions, snobbery and xenophobia evident in her novels and mocked as
a conservative relic of a Britain that no longer exists.
And yet she endures. Her tales of youthful pluck and outdoor picnics
with lashings of ginger beer might have seemed comically outmoded by the
Swinging Sixties but are now read in a spirit of enormous nostalgia for
mid-century Britain, the values of friendship, fairness and freedom she
espoused appealing to audiences anew in more self-centred times.
Her memory has also been coloured somewhat by A Childhood at Green
Hedges, the scathing memoir her daughter Imogen Smallwood wrote in 1989
in which she states: “The truth is, Enid Blyton was arrogant,
insecure, pretentious, very skilled at putting difficult or unpleasant
things out of her mind, and without a trace of maternal instinct. As a
child, I viewed her as a rather strict authority. As an adult, I did not
hate her. I pitied her.”
Imogen's daughter Sophie, Enid's granddaughter, offered a kinder
assessment of Blyton’s work in 2009, telling The Guardian: “Her
writing is that of an intelligent 12-year-old. In my view that’s why
adults find it difficult to relate to her because she doesn’t quite
have the depth; it has that childlike quality.”
Former Children’s Laureate Anne Fine has also defended her, telling
BBC Radio 4 in 2008: “In times of falling reading levels and limitless
other distractions, we grasp at any author who has that turn-the-page
quality. And for reasons that may remain entirely mysterious to reading
adults, she certainly has that.”...
https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/enid-blyton-50-years-anniversary-death-legacy-childrens-books-author-a8648281.html
By Ceri Radford, Nov. 27th
"Enid Blyton 50 years on: Let’s be more critical about books venerated
in the past"
...While golliwogs – a racial caricature of a toy – were dropped
from a 1980s BBC adaptation of Noddy, and two of the Famous Five, Fanny
and Dick, have been astutely renamed, what is harder to eradicate is a
general sense of smug judgement. Blyton’s books take a snide tone
towards anyone who isn’t part of the jolly-hockey-sticks,
stiff-upper-lip club. Take this early scene from First Term at Malory
Towers, when a much-praised boarding school teacher meets an upset new
girl: “Miss Potts looked at Gwendoline. She had already sized her up
and knew her to be a spoiled only child, selfish and difficult to handle
at first.”
You can’t blame Blyton for capturing a zeitgeist long before the
existence of emotional support peacocks, but you can wonder at the
enduring popularity of a writer who apparently set such little stock in
empathy, the real cornerstone of imagination.
Blyton remains a bestselling author, raising the question: who buys
them? Is it all Jacob Rees-Mogg having a laugh, feverishly dragging them
into his shopping cart and cackling as he gets one over on
golliwog-shunning millennial snowflakes?
While Blyton has an undeniable knack for crafting a tale, so do many writers...
(snip)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/11/28/enid-blyton-taught-female-friendship/
"What Enid Blyton taught me about female friendship" by Gwen Smith
(you have to subscribe)
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6074615/The-inside-story-best-seling-childrens-author-Enid-Blyton.html
(about her life - I don't know how close to accurate it is)
Lenona.
We had a "Noddy" book, which my father hated, so I would always make him
read it to me.

Later when my sister's first child was young, I got her a "Noddy" book
and was amazed at how really bad it was. My father was absolutely right.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Michael R N Dolbear
2018-11-30 00:44:47 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
We had a "Noddy" book, which my father hated, so I would always make him
read it to me.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Later when my sister's first child was young, I got her a "Noddy" book
and was amazed at how really bad it was. My father was absolutely right

I still remember Noddy and Big Ears building a house by putting the roof on
first.

In case it rained?
--
Mike D
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