Discussion:
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:03:45 UTC
Permalink
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams

I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.

In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.

Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..

Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.

The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.

While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 10:10:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-24 12:13:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Nowdays I often use kindle text-to-speech into the aux jack of my car stero.
However for either format of book, I do a lot of reading at restaurants
during lunch & dinner, and I never eat at home if I can help it.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
D B Davis
2020-04-22 02:47:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Nowdays I often use kindle text-to-speech into the aux jack of my car stero.
However for either format of book, I do a lot of reading at restaurants
during lunch & dinner, and I never eat at home if I can help it.
Please don't gouge out your eyes whatever you do! It's best to move on
to better stories and simply forget all about "a tale. Told by an idiot,
full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing."

Watching _Columbo_ episodes for the very first time is a new tradition
in my household. Its creators grew up on _Ellory Queen_.
When my wife requested an audiobook to while away some time
"The Monogram Murders" popped up. [1] It seemed a safe bet given how
much my wife enjoys _Columbo_, so the audiobook was duly loaded onto an
mp3 player.

The relatively warm weather for the past week enabled my bicycle ride
with a dash of _Perry Rhodan_ to begin in earnest once more. Endorphins
and Ackerman allow me to time travel back to my Golden Age, at least
psychologically.
Before this afternoon's ride, your comments about listening to
audiobooks came to mind. "Why not listen to an audiobook during my spin
instead of music?" my mind asked itself.
It was a smashing success!

Note.

[1] https://archive.org/details/TheMonogramMurders-HerculePoirot



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-22 03:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Nowdays I often use kindle text-to-speech into the aux jack of my car stero.
However for either format of book, I do a lot of reading at restaurants
during lunch & dinner, and I never eat at home if I can help it.
Please don't gouge out your eyes whatever you do! It's best to move on
to better stories and simply forget all about "a tale. Told by an idiot,
full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing."
Watching _Columbo_ episodes for the very first time is a new tradition
in my household. Its creators grew up on _Ellory Queen_.
When my wife requested an audiobook to while away some time
"The Monogram Murders" popped up. [1] It seemed a safe bet given how
much my wife enjoys _Columbo_, so the audiobook was duly loaded onto an
mp3 player.
The relatively warm weather for the past week enabled my bicycle ride
with a dash of _Perry Rhodan_ to begin in earnest once more. Endorphins
and Ackerman allow me to time travel back to my Golden Age, at least
psychologically.
Before this afternoon's ride, your comments about listening to
audiobooks came to mind. "Why not listen to an audiobook during my spin
instead of music?" my mind asked itself.
It was a smashing success!
Note.
[1] https://archive.org/details/TheMonogramMurders-HerculePoirot
☮
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.

The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.

I have read some of the early "fair play" Ellery Queen mysteries, and enjoyed
them, though I admit I did not figure them out despite, as Queen explictly
points out, having all the clues. I should probably read some more.

"Colombo" was always a favorite of mine. Perhaps it's time for a reboot
as it's been a decent interval since Falk's passing now. Hard to imagine
anyone else doing the shtick though.

With the current hiatus, I have done very little long distance driving
to listen to books, and without restaurants, I am reading less in general.
I should probably make an effort to step away from the computer and pick up
the kindle.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jay E. Morris
2020-04-22 03:12:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-22 03:20:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Paul S Person
2020-04-22 16:45:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-22 17:33:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
Oh yeah: Hey, colors!
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jay E. Morris
2020-04-22 22:14:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
Oh yeah: Hey, colors!
And the stars came back!
Paul S Person
2020-04-23 16:21:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
Oh yeah: Hey, colors!
Ever wonder why old people tend to develop a less-than-optimistic view
of things?

Could it be the result of looking at the world through a yellow
screen?
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2020-04-23 19:17:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
Oh yeah: Hey, colors!
Ever wonder why old people tend to develop a less-than-optimistic view
of things?
Could it be the result of looking at the world through a yellow
screen?
Could be... but I would imagine that you don't notice it
until it changes. Even when it makes your vision quite poor.

My late mother had cataract surgery and reported that the
world was considerably clearer afterwards, sharper - like
higher resolution, though she didn't say that.

And of course that sort of thing is the point of the surgery.
Paul S Person
2020-04-24 16:37:48 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:17:31 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Actually I had my eyes gouged out late last year.
The lenses, at least. I'm quite happy with the result: You don't really
realize how bad the cataracts are until they are gone.
Little over a month ago. Damn, things are bright.
Yep, all those 200 watt bulbs are suddenly a bit much. And, man being able
to see driving at night again!
The first thing I noticed was that the world looked a lot less yellow.
--
Oh yeah: Hey, colors!
Ever wonder why old people tend to develop a less-than-optimistic view
of things?
Could it be the result of looking at the world through a yellow
screen?
Could be... but I would imagine that you don't notice it
until it changes. Even when it makes your vision quite poor.
Not consciously ... but it might affect your attitude. Things just
don't look as bright and cheerful as they did when you were younger.
Post by Robert Carnegie
My late mother had cataract surgery and reported that the
world was considerably clearer afterwards, sharper - like
higher resolution, though she didn't say that.
I had a friend whose grandmother had her house pointed /before/ the
cataract surgery (some years before, IIRC). She thought that she had
picked a nice, tame off-white color.

When she got back home after the cataract surgery she was shocked to
see that she had, in fact, chosen a white so bright it almost made her
eyes bleed. if you catch my gist.
Post by Robert Carnegie
And of course that sort of thing is the point of the surgery.
Indeed it is.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
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