Discussion:
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:03:45 UTC
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039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams

I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.

In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.

Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..

Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.

The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.

While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 10:10:33 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-24 12:13:15 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
039 Demon Song (The Blood Singer Novels) by Cat Adams
I nearly checked out of this series after finding book one marginal
for my tastes, but a poster on RASFW talked me into trying book
two, and indeed it was bettter than book one. Unfortunately, "Demon
Song" seems back at book one quality.
In this book, bodyguard turned half-vampire Celia Graves stumbles
from one ramdom incident ("magic wine!", "drug mules!") to another
with anything resembling a coherent plot only gelling in the last
quarter of the book, and even that is beset by incoherent digressions
(the whole land purchase, Atlantean heritage thing), and a totally
arbitrary (and not well justified) "sacrifice" by two very minor
characters.
Perhaps the worst random incident is Celia deciding to take on a
vampire pack, on a whim when she heard about them menacing the
Mexican restaurant where she had gone for dinner. Hello, she's
supposed to be a pro. First of all, it's not her job. This setting
has magic using cops. Calling them should be the obvious first
step. *If* for some reason they can't handle the problem and Celia
wants to help out her aquaintances (they don't seem to be actual
friends with whom she hangs out), making a real plan would be the
next step..
Along the way in this book, Celia's world starts making even less
sense with the fact that Atlantis existed in historical times simply
dropped on top of all the other unlikely history. Atlantis existed
and Atlantean survivors settled in England and colonized America?
And we never heard of this before and the US seems to exist with
basically the same history and structure as in our world? Really?
I just couldn't believe in it at all any more.
The constant theme of therapy got old very quickly even in book
one. By now it is eye-gougingly annoying. Yes, in real life,
people to whom traumatic events happen have trouble dealing with
it. That doesn't mean it works as a major element in an action,
adventure story.
While I was struggling through this book, which seemed to take
forever, the next Ilona Andrews "Edge" book arrived from Amazon.
Somehow it ended up in my car instead of this book when I needed a
book to kill some time. It was so much better, and so much easier
to read, that I really had to force myself to put it down when I
got home and finish this one. In retrospect I should not have.
I seem to have not asked you last time (if I was here)
about how you read while driving... and actually
find your way home.
Nowdays I often use kindle text-to-speech into the aux jack of my car stero.
However for either format of book, I do a lot of reading at restaurants
during lunch & dinner, and I never eat at home if I can help it.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
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