Discussion:
YASID and a couple of funny names
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Lee Gleason
2021-07-29 15:49:48 UTC
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I'm trying to recall the name of a short story. I read it in a
collection of stories in the mid 60s. It was about a chess playing AI
that had improved to the point that it looked like it was going to be
unbeatable by human players (this was back when it was in question
whether that could ever happen). The story mostly covers a big game
between the current human chess champion and the AI.

The plot point I remember, was during a series of games, the human
player's supporters realize that the AI's openings are all based on book
openings from one specific book of openings. They get to work on the
resource in question, and find a misprint that, when followed is a
blunder, that allows the human player to win.


Also trying to remember which SF stories contained the funny names
"Banjo Freeko" and "Wilhelm Stuzzicadenti". Two different stories. I
think they were funny stories - Harrison? Laumer? Don't recall anything
else...

--
Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
Control-G Consultants
***@comcast.net
Robert Woodward
2021-07-29 16:54:34 UTC
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Post by Lee Gleason
I'm trying to recall the name of a short story. I read it in a
collection of stories in the mid 60s. It was about a chess playing AI
that had improved to the point that it looked like it was going to be
unbeatable by human players (this was back when it was in question
whether that could ever happen). The story mostly covers a big game
between the current human chess champion and the AI.
The plot point I remember, was during a series of games, the human
player's supporters realize that the AI's openings are all based on book
openings from one specific book of openings. They get to work on the
resource in question, and find a misprint that, when followed is a
blunder, that allows the human player to win.
This could be "The 64-Square Madhouse" by Fritz Leiber, but, IIRC, the
chess playing AI was in a regular tournament (BTW, the other contestants
were barely disguised early 60s grandmasters - the player, whose team
found the data error described above, was a renamed Bobby Fisher).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Martin
2021-07-29 19:29:21 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lee Gleason
I'm trying to recall the name of a short story. I read it in a
collection of stories in the mid 60s. It was about a chess playing AI
that had improved to the point that it looked like it was going to be
unbeatable by human players (this was back when it was in question
whether that could ever happen). The story mostly covers a big game
between the current human chess champion and the AI.
The plot point I remember, was during a series of games, the human
player's supporters realize that the AI's openings are all based on book
openings from one specific book of openings. They get to work on the
resource in question, and find a misprint that, when followed is a
blunder, that allows the human player to win.
This could be "The 64-Square Madhouse" by Fritz Leiber, but, IIRC, the
chess playing AI was in a regular tournament (BTW, the other contestants
were barely disguised early 60s grandmasters - the player, whose team
found the data error described above, was a renamed Bobby Fisher).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
It's undoubtedly "The 64-Square Madhouse". As you noted, the tournament included thinly disguised RL grandmasters plus the AI.

Fritz Leiber was an excellent chess player, I believe holding an Expert rating (for non-fans, that's the USCF rating just below Master) and wrote several other fine chess stories. His "Midnight by the Morphy Watch" is one of the best ever.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2021-07-29 22:22:36 UTC
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Post by Lee Gleason
Also trying to remember which SF stories contained the
funny names
"Banjo Freeko"
Google is your friend. (And you spelled both right, even.)
https://www.tor.com/2020/03/12/the-lensman-series-explodes-into-
action-galactic-patrol-by-e-e-doc-smith/
https://tinyurl.com/3k9nx2ah
"Randall Garrett parodied Galactic Patrol in 1949. He claimed
that Doc Smith loved it. It was Smith who suggested renaming
the Dauntless the Dentless.
"“On Leanonabar,” Ginnison continued, “I got a line
through Banjo Freeko, the planetary dictator, but only after I
blew up the mining industry on his planet and killed a few
thousand innocent people—regretfully, of course. But I do
that all the time. It revolts me, but I do it.” “What boots
it?” Woozle asked. “You got your line, didn’t you? You
humans are so squeamish.”"
This sounds a lot more like a parody of _Second Stage Lensman_
(specifically the events of Chapter 9, "Cartiff the Fence") than
it does _Galactic Patrol_.
I only report what I find. I don't have enough of a memory of
either to speculate.
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
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