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The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
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Titus G
2021-05-27 05:40:33 UTC
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The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.

The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-28 10:10:25 UTC
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Post by Titus G
The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Hmm, yes. The writer doesn't consider consequences
for other version of characters, but we do.

But maybe the characters in the other lives are only
story book fictional versions, after all. (Which is actually
the case, of course.) Like hologram versions of people
you know - usually a bad idea by the way. Bad for you.
But this protagonist already died, so...
Titus G
2021-05-30 01:24:35 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Hmm, yes. The writer doesn't consider consequences
for other version of characters, but we do.
But maybe the characters in the other lives are only
story book fictional versions, after all. (Which is actually
the case, of course.) Like hologram versions of people
you know - usually a bad idea by the way. Bad for you.
But this protagonist already died, so...
Sorry if I did not explain properly but it appears you have
misunderstood the basic ideas. In interest of brevity, I did not mention
that the "LIBRARY" only applied to this title's protagonist. If she had
been a chef, the title would have been The Midnight Smorgasbord with an
infinite number of recipes with no fictional vegetables.
Each alternate lifeline is as valid as her own previous existence.
(Which has just ended.)
She can test and choose any of an infinite number of alternate lifelines.
(In which she can live again.)
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-30 13:16:31 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Hmm, yes. The writer doesn't consider consequences
for other version of characters, but we do.
But maybe the characters in the other lives are only
story book fictional versions, after all. (Which is actually
the case, of course.) Like hologram versions of people
you know - usually a bad idea by the way. Bad for you.
But this protagonist already died, so...
Sorry if I did not explain properly but it appears you have
misunderstood the basic ideas. In interest of brevity, I did not mention
that the "LIBRARY" only applied to this title's protagonist. If she had
been a chef, the title would have been The Midnight Smorgasbord with an
infinite number of recipes with no fictional vegetables.
Each alternate lifeline is as valid as her own previous existence.
(Which has just ended.)
She can test and choose any of an infinite number of alternate lifelines.
(In which she can live again.)
So... is it explicit then that you would make potentially
an infinite number of meals, from one original order
of vegetables? So to speak.

That is, while the heroine lives a different life instead,
and remembers, people around her also have their
original life cancelled and replaced, and they don't
remember?
Titus G
2021-05-30 20:42:08 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Hmm, yes. The writer doesn't consider consequences
for other version of characters, but we do.
But maybe the characters in the other lives are only
story book fictional versions, after all. (Which is actually
the case, of course.) Like hologram versions of people
you know - usually a bad idea by the way. Bad for you.
But this protagonist already died, so...
Sorry if I did not explain properly but it appears you have
misunderstood the basic ideas. In interest of brevity, I did not mention
that the "LIBRARY" only applied to this title's protagonist. If she had
been a chef, the title would have been The Midnight Smorgasbord with an
infinite number of recipes with no fictional vegetables.
Each alternate lifeline is as valid as her own previous existence.
(Which has just ended.)
She can test and choose any of an infinite number of alternate lifelines.
(In which she can live again.)
So... is it explicit then that you would make potentially
an infinite number of meals, from one original order
of vegetables? So to speak.
There are an infinite number of physical universes with a new one being
created whenever someone makes a decision.
When you die in one, time for you stops at midnight whilst you sample
any or all of these alternate universes with the option of continuing
your life in one of these other universes.
Post by Robert Carnegie
That is, while the heroine lives a different life instead,
and remembers, people around her also have their
original life cancelled and replaced, and they don't
remember?
No. There are an infinite number of universes. The "heroine" replaces
her alternate self in the universe she chooses.
One of the problems I originally mentioned was that there was " no
serious consideration of the effects of this >>>> on the alternate when
the corpse chooses to leave" that universe. I think the concept has not
been considered very much but just used as a framework
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-30 23:42:39 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
The Midnight Library. Martin Haig.
The only SF involved is the idea that when dying, time stops at midnight
and your infinite life options are presented based on each decision ever
made. So it is mainly a series of Cinderella stories with unexpected
outcomes.
I enjoyed it as a pleasant pot boiler but it had more of a Maeve Binchey
atmosphere than innovative SF. A major interest was the outcome of
subsidiary characters as well as that of the corpse.
Because the dead character replaced her alternate in each other timeline
with no knowledge of this alternate's history, there were a lot of fish
out of water moments and no serious consideration of the effects of this
on the alternate when the corpse chooses to leave so I wouldn't
recommend it from an SF perspective. More of a NY Times pot boiler,
oops, best seller.
Hmm, yes. The writer doesn't consider consequences
for other version of characters, but we do.
But maybe the characters in the other lives are only
story book fictional versions, after all. (Which is actually
the case, of course.) Like hologram versions of people
you know - usually a bad idea by the way. Bad for you.
But this protagonist already died, so...
Sorry if I did not explain properly but it appears you have
misunderstood the basic ideas. In interest of brevity, I did not mention
that the "LIBRARY" only applied to this title's protagonist. If she had
been a chef, the title would have been The Midnight Smorgasbord with an
infinite number of recipes with no fictional vegetables.
Each alternate lifeline is as valid as her own previous existence.
(Which has just ended.)
She can test and choose any of an infinite number of alternate lifelines.
(In which she can live again.)
So... is it explicit then that you would make potentially
an infinite number of meals, from one original order
of vegetables? So to speak.
There are an infinite number of physical universes with a new one being
created whenever someone makes a decision.
When you die in one, time for you stops at midnight whilst you sample
any or all of these alternate universes with the option of continuing
your life in one of these other universes.
That is, while the heroine lives a different life instead,
and remembers, people around her also have their
original life cancelled and replaced, and they don't
remember?
No. There are an infinite number of universes. The "heroine" replaces
her alternate self in the universe she chooses.
One of the problems I originally mentioned was that there was " no
serious consideration of the effects of this >>>> on the alternate when
the corpse chooses to leave" that universe. I think the concept has not
been considered very much but just used as a framework
TV show _Quantum Leap_ had a similar effect.
A time travel experiment gone wrong had someone
in the recent past each week possessed
by Dr Sam Beckett. We saw Scott Bakula, in the
past, except when he looked in a mirror. When he
fixed some problem in that person's neighbourhood,
he was whisked away to possess someone else.
How the possessed person experienced this was
rarely explored. Apparently they possessed
Sam Beckett's body in "The Waiting Room"
!in the future. In an episode "Killing Time", Sam is
swapped with a serial killer who escapes into Sam's
strange future world... 1999.

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