Discussion:
OT: How is Coronavirus affecting you?
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J. Clarke
2020-03-23 06:18:30 UTC
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I'll start out.

I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.

I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.

So, anybody else want to go?
m***@sky.com
2020-03-23 06:29:21 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Working from home. This is irritating because of lack of communication - ideally, everybody is supposed to be in earshot - but should be doable. I don't think I'm about to lose my job, but this is not the first source of change and uncertainty this year. Normally about half of my grocery shop is storeable food, for convenience and because I only shop once a week. This week I couldn't buy that half, which is annoying in the short term and worrying if it continues - I'm not in any of the favoured classes, but I still need to eat.
Ahasuerus
2020-03-23 19:55:48 UTC
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Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 21:03:55 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2020-03-24 03:43:36 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 04:09:36 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Wellll, if you had somebody else to teach you the multiplication
table and, in good time, improper fractions, then you didn't need
grandparents, did you? My mother was the youngest of her
parents' several children, and by the time I knew they they were
extremely old and, in my grandfather's case, just slightly ga-ga.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2020-03-24 06:18:20 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Wellll, if you had somebody else to teach you the multiplication
table and, in good time, improper fractions, then you didn't need
grandparents, did you? My mother was the youngest of her
parents' several children, and by the time I knew they they were
extremely old and, in my grandfather's case, just slightly ga-ga.
Just joking, Dorothy. My primary school teachers were authoritarians and
I was the school champion at arithmetic after years of chanted rote
learning.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 14:40:17 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Wellll, if you had somebody else to teach you the multiplication
table and, in good time, improper fractions, then you didn't need
grandparents, did you? My mother was the youngest of her
parents' several children, and by the time I knew they they were
extremely old and, in my grandfather's case, just slightly ga-ga.
Just joking, Dorothy. My primary school teachers were authoritarians and
I was the school champion at arithmetic after years of chanted rote
learning.
Good for you.

Mathematical talent apparently is not genetically determined. I
had to finish my 7th-grade arithmetic workbook by looking up the
answers in the back. Hal took math classes at the local junior
college, his senior year in high school, because his high school
had run out of math classes. Our daughter Meg won a statewide
math championship, *her* senior year in high school. Her son
thinks an adequate answer to any math question is "I don't know."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2020-03-24 17:00:32 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Wellll, if you had somebody else to teach you the multiplication
table and, in good time, improper fractions, then you didn't need
grandparents, did you? My mother was the youngest of her
parents' several children, and by the time I knew they they were
extremely old and, in my grandfather's case, just slightly ga-ga.
Just joking, Dorothy. My primary school teachers were authoritarians and
I was the school champion at arithmetic after years of chanted rote
learning.
Good for you.
Mathematical talent apparently is not genetically determined. I
had to finish my 7th-grade arithmetic workbook by looking up the
answers in the back. Hal took math classes at the local junior
college, his senior year in high school, because his high school
had run out of math classes. Our daughter Meg won a statewide
math championship, *her* senior year in high school. Her son
thinks an adequate answer to any math question is "I don't know."
So, he takes after you then.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 19:02:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Wellll, if you had somebody else to teach you the multiplication
table and, in good time, improper fractions, then you didn't need
grandparents, did you? My mother was the youngest of her
parents' several children, and by the time I knew they they were
extremely old and, in my grandfather's case, just slightly ga-ga.
Just joking, Dorothy. My primary school teachers were authoritarians and
I was the school champion at arithmetic after years of chanted rote
learning.
Good for you.
Mathematical talent apparently is not genetically determined. I
had to finish my 7th-grade arithmetic workbook by looking up the
answers in the back. Hal took math classes at the local junior
college, his senior year in high school, because his high school
had run out of math classes. Our daughter Meg won a statewide
math championship, *her* senior year in high school. Her son
thinks an adequate answer to any math question is "I don't know."
So, he takes after you then.
Yes, unfortunately.

But I got drilled till I knew the tables, and so shall he be.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 19:21:36 UTC
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Permalink
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.

Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
from home) and was told the following:

Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.

Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.

She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.

She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?

Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.

*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.

Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2020-03-25 17:33:52 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.
Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.
Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.
She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.
She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?
Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.
*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.
Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.

I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.

And I got my postcard yesterday detailing Trump's instructions. Well,
his instructions as of last week, anyway.

Will we get another the week after Easter telling us all to go back to
work and get the economy moving again? Who can say.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-25 20:18:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.
Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.
Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.
She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.
She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?
Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.
*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.
Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.
I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.
Well, Hal checked out the local Safeway today and said it wasn't
particularly crowded. He did note that when he brought out his
fabric grocery bags (which I had just laundered the hell out of),
the checker said, no, she couldn't bag anything in them, she had
to use plastic.

Hal said, no problem, he bagged them himself, and told me he was
going to get their plastic bags from now on and recycle them; but
he can still use the fabric bags for Costco (because they don't
bag anything, just load it back in the shopping cart).
Post by Paul S Person
And I got my postcard yesterday detailing Trump's instructions. Well,
his instructions as of last week, anyway.
CDC's instructions, which in a fit of sanity (maybe) he allowed
his name to appear on. Even so, it's good advice.
Post by Paul S Person
Will we get another the week after Easter telling us all to go back to
work and get the economy moving again? Who can say.
If he says that, I'll ignore him. Several notable Republican
nitwits (I realize that's a redundancy) are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*

In other news, Meg's boss's son and son's girlfriend have tested
negative, so that's good news, and Meg goes back to work
tomorrow...
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2020-03-25 21:28:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.
Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.
Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.
She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.
She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?
Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.
*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.
Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.
I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.
Well, Hal checked out the local Safeway today and said it wasn't
particularly crowded. He did note that when he brought out his
fabric grocery bags (which I had just laundered the hell out of),
the checker said, no, she couldn't bag anything in them, she had
to use plastic.
That's not an option here. Our illustrious governor and his cronies
banned grocery bags a few months back, presumably to save the turtles
or some such.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Hal said, no problem, he bagged them himself, and told me he was
going to get their plastic bags from now on and recycle them; but
he can still use the fabric bags for Costco (because they don't
bag anything, just load it back in the shopping cart).
Post by Paul S Person
And I got my postcard yesterday detailing Trump's instructions. Well,
his instructions as of last week, anyway.
CDC's instructions, which in a fit of sanity (maybe) he allowed
his name to appear on. Even so, it's good advice.
Post by Paul S Person
Will we get another the week after Easter telling us all to go back to
work and get the economy moving again? Who can say.
If he says that, I'll ignore him. Several notable Republican
nitwits (I realize that's a redundancy) are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*
In other news, Meg's boss's son and son's girlfriend have tested
negative, so that's good news, and Meg goes back to work
tomorrow...
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-25 22:22:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, Hal checked out the local Safeway today and said it wasn't
particularly crowded. He did note that when he brought out his
fabric grocery bags (which I had just laundered the hell out of),
the checker said, no, she couldn't bag anything in them, she had
to use plastic.
That's not an option here. Our illustrious governor and his cronies
banned grocery bags a few months back, presumably to save the turtles
or some such.
Yes, there's a county-by-county plastic-bag ban in California;
Alameda County (where we used to live) has banned them, but
Solano county, where we live now, still uses them.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2020-03-25 23:52:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.
Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.
Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.
She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.
She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?
Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.
*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.
Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.
I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.
Well, Hal checked out the local Safeway today and said it wasn't
particularly crowded. He did note that when he brought out his
fabric grocery bags (which I had just laundered the hell out of),
the checker said, no, she couldn't bag anything in them, she had
to use plastic.
That's not an option here. Our illustrious governor and his cronies
banned grocery bags a few months back, presumably to save the turtles
or some such.
ShopRite just emailed that they are packing all online orders
only in plastic bags.

They probably don't trust that most folks launder the reusable
bags, which I would say is a dair bet.

Kevin R
Paul S Person
2020-03-26 17:15:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, it's like this. Hal and I are sheltering-in-place (except
that he occasionally hits the grocery store*), I haven't left the
house in weeks, the grandson is home from school, son-in-law is
working from home, and daughter Meg, who works for a lawyer, was
going to work as usual.
Until this morning, when she walked in the door (her boss works
Her son, who ordinarily lives and works in Quebec City, was
visiting her a few weeks ago, and when he tried to get back to
Canada, was turned away at the border. So he was living with his
girlfriend and her [immunocompromised] mother, until last night
when girlfriend developed a fever and a cough. Frantic call to
his mother at 2 AM, visit to the ER where son and girlfriend got
tested (girlfriend's mother refused to go), and now they're
living with his mom the lawyer at least till they get their test
results back.
Meg is annoyed that her boss didn't send her mail about all this
*before* she got to work.
She came home, sending instructions ahead of her (thank $DEITY
for email), and her husband, the ex-USAF sergeant, who has
handled decontamination procedures before, had things ready for
her to dump all her clothes in the wash, jump into the shower and
scrub thoroughly, while he disinfected everything she might have
touched, including doorknobs.
She's going to be home today and tomorrow, and maybe longer
depending on how the tests come out. She is annoyed, did I
mention that?
Her job cannot be done online, because it involves real
signatures on pieces of paper which have to be transported to
various courthouses... but the courthouses in most of the Bay
Area counties have closed their doors till further notice.
*In other news, Hal went to Costco mid-morning and discovered that
they are now limiting the number of shoppers in the store at any
one time [good], and the line was stretching from the door to the
automotive area [not so good]. Not wishing to stand out in the
open for two hours, he came back again, after ascertaining that
the Costco is instituting seniors-only early-morning hours [good]
on Tuesdays and Thursdays [not so good, because it was already 11
AM Tuesday]. He's making plans to get up early Thursday and hit
the Costco, and then come back for breakfast.
Life, as the agony aunt on Slate keeps saying, is a rich
tapestry.
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.
I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.
Well, Hal checked out the local Safeway today and said it wasn't
particularly crowded. He did note that when he brought out his
fabric grocery bags (which I had just laundered the hell out of),
the checker said, no, she couldn't bag anything in them, she had
to use plastic.
That's not an option here. Our illustrious governor and his cronies
banned grocery bags a few months back, presumably to save the turtles
or some such.
ShopRite just emailed that they are packing all online orders
only in plastic bags.
They probably don't trust that most folks launder the reusable
bags, which I would say is a dair bet.
Why, exactly, would you launder something that never touches food
(only packaging) and that only you interact with?

Aren't the checkers/baggers wearing plastic gloves?

And sanitizing their work area between each customer?
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Kevrob
2020-03-26 17:50:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Kevrob
ShopRite just emailed that they are packing all online orders
only in plastic bags.
They probably don't trust that most folks launder the reusable
bags, which I would say is a dair bet.
Why, exactly, would you launder something that never touches food
(only packaging) and that only you interact with?
Some food packaging leaks. Ever buy meat where the juices
bleed out of the wrapping? Dairy where the container hasn't
been compromised, but the one next to it in the cooler was,
and there's a bit of splash on the outside?

Who knows what people shove in those totes at home:
dirty dishes brought home from taking lunch with you
to work or school, dirty laundry, impromptu "airsickness"
bag?
Post by Paul S Person
Aren't the checkers/baggers wearing plastic gloves?
And sanitizing their work area between each customer?
Maybe not that frequently.

Local store are putting up plexiglass sneezeguards
on the customer side of the checkouts.

I have to put laudry in the dryer. Yes, I have
cloth totebags in that load! I have a couple of
plasticized ones that need a wipedown with cleaner
that has bleach in it.

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310

o***@gmail.com
2020-03-26 02:05:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Several.... are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*
If you have time, in your isolation, could you provide verification for those quotes.

(and...don't bother with the TX lt.gov.....that was an intentional misquote for ratings.....)
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-26 04:04:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Several.... are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*
If you have time, in your isolation, could you provide verification for those quotes.
(and...don't bother with the TX lt.gov.....that was an intentional misquote for ratings.....)
Here's one:

https://www.salon.com/2020/03/25/glenn-beck-tells-older-americans-to-get-back-to-work-id-rather-die-than-kill-the-country/

And there was one other, but I can find at atm. I'll keep
looking.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2020-03-26 04:46:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 26/03/20 5:04 pm, Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
snip
And there was one other, but I can find at atm. snip
Is that
(a) at at the moment
or
(b) at automatic teller machine?

If (a), why are you stuttering. Do you have something to hide?
If (b), are you suggesting a bribe?

As this is my first post in my new unemployment at HomeLand Security
Isolation, I do not have to apologise for being rude and aggressive
because worse is to come. Thank you. Ooops, I shouldn't have said that.
Our Texas agents have your house surrounded and if forced to enter we
will not be responsible for fracked oil stains from their boots on you
or your belongings. Thank you. Ooops, I shouldn't have said that.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-26 05:26:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
snip
And there was one other, but I can find at atm. snip
Is that
(a) at at the moment
or
(b) at automatic teller machine?
If (a), why are you stuttering. Do you have something to hide?
If (b), are you suggesting a bribe?
Nope, just rebellious fingers.
Post by Titus G
As this is my first post in my new unemployment at HomeLand Security
Isolation, I do not have to apologise for being rude and aggressive
because worse is to come. Thank you. Ooops, I shouldn't have said that.
Our Texas agents have your house surrounded and if forced to enter we
will not be responsible for fracked oil stains from their boots on you
or your belongings. Thank you. Ooops, I shouldn't have said that.
Your Texas agents will have a long hike if they're coming to my
door.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2020-03-26 04:31:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Several.... are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*
If you have time, in your isolation, could you provide verification for those quotes.
(and...don't bother with the TX lt.gov.....that was an intentional misquote for ratings.....)
Things just got more interesting. I haven't seen any followup stories.
Paul S Person
2020-03-26 17:19:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by o***@gmail.com
Several.... are saying that *those
over 60 and at risk should go back to work and boost up the
economy for their grandchildren's sake.*
If you have time, in your isolation, could you provide verification for those quotes.
(and...don't bother with the TX lt.gov.....that was an intentional misquote for ratings.....)
Things just got more interesting. I haven't seen any followup stories.
The story I saw reporting it also reported that the /decision/ was up
to the Governor, not the Lt, and the Gov believes that people come
first.

Or maybe he was the Gov (several have wayed in in response to Trump)
who pointed out that, without people, there won't /be/ an economy to
restart.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-25 21:47:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Evidently this card?, with commentary by Michael Hiltzik.
<https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-03-24/trump-guidelines-for-america>

Some of it superseded if local government won't
let you out of the house anyway.

Perhaps it's best to resist temptation to parody
it with text from Presidential tweets.

But if someone wants to organise a coach trip
of mildly infected doctors and nurses for an
impromptu summit at Mar-a-Lago, then sure.

As for closing food retail, people have to eat -
eventually - and the food bank / pantry approach
has similar drawbacks. The United Kingdom is
basically on the same rules as France now:
I can go out to buy food but I'm not sure if
I can visit a laundry or magazine store too.
Finding them under one roof might be a get-out.
So to speak.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-25 22:24:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Evidently this card?, with commentary by Michael Hiltzik.
<https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-03-24/trump-guidelines-for-america>
Some of it superseded if local government won't
let you out of the house anyway.
Perhaps it's best to resist temptation to parody
it with text from Presidential tweets.
But if someone wants to organise a coach trip
of mildly infected doctors and nurses for an
impromptu summit at Mar-a-Lago, then sure.
As for closing food retail, people have to eat -
eventually - and the food bank / pantry approach
has similar drawbacks. The United Kingdom is
I can go out to buy food but I'm not sure if
I can visit a laundry or magazine store too.
Assuming they're open at all.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Finding them under one roof might be a get-out.
So to speak.
Groceries and pharmacies are among the places allowed to be open,
and so are legal services ... which is why Meg goes back to work
tomorrow.

(But the courthouses are still closed, so she has a lot less
driving to do.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2020-03-26 04:31:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Evidently this card?, with commentary by Michael Hiltzik.
<https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-03-24/trump-guidelines-for-america>
Some of it superseded if local government won't let you out of the
house anyway.
Perhaps it's best to resist temptation to parody it with text from
Presidential tweets.
But if someone wants to organise a coach trip of mildly infected
doctors and nurses for an impromptu summit at Mar-a-Lago, then sure.
As for closing food retail, people have to eat - eventually - and the
food bank / pantry approach has similar drawbacks. The United
Kingdom is basically on the same rules as France now: I can go out to
buy food but I'm not sure if I can visit a laundry or magazine store
too. Finding them under one roof might be a get-out. So to speak.
Laundries are regarded as essential in NZ but there are rules about
number of people allowed in at one time and keeping at least two metres
apart. Corner dairies, (small convenience stores), are open for one
customer at a time. All food takeaway shops are closed.
Our rules require isolation but we are not restricted to our own
property so am able to walk the dog, ride the trike and drive the car
for pleasure as long as I am alone or with those who live in the same
house and two metres away from all others. Driving has been discouraged
but by whom I do not know. There is a rumour that it should be for
essential services only. Old people are discouraged from supermarket
shopping and my immediate neighbour has volunteered to do mine.
Titus G
2020-03-26 06:54:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 26/03/20 5:31 pm, Titus G wrote:
Driving has been discouraged
Post by Titus G
but by whom I do not know. There is a rumour that it should be for
essential services only.
I have just read a newspaper article in which the Police said that
driving should only be for essential services such as going to work,
part of work or such things as supermarket shopping.
Garrett Wollman
2020-03-25 22:51:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Those-in-charge are twigging to the fact that, now that pretty much
every /other/ place where people used to gather is closed, grocery
stores are the center of the spread of the virus. Drug stores next, I
suppose.
I await with keen anticipation whatever bizarreness I find at the
grocery store tomorrow.
I went to a Whole Foods earlier this week and they were metering
customers at the door, one out one in. I declined to stand in line,
freezing, six feet apart, behind a dozen people, and went to another
supermarket that was not so limited. (Unfortunately, I had to buy
crappy sandwich bread as a result, but I was on my lunch break and
couldn't spend another half an hour standing outside.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Paul S Person
2020-03-24 16:59:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Fixer, the robot that we use to help us keep the ISFDB database up to
date, has been unbearably smug and schadenfreude-ly lately -- humans
finally get to experience how big a deal virus transmission can be!
Hal would sympathize with you entirely-- he's just installed a
new system on the new DunDraCon Pis, and they aren't talking to
him. But he can't right now, because he's busy trying to teach
our grandson about improper fractions. I have already spent my
half-hour or so making him learn the multiplication table: he
knows the twos and bogs down in the middle of the threes.
I never knew my grandparents and have previously thought that was a
negative.
Oh, I don't know.

If she gives him a cookie for each right answer, it might be quite the
positive experience!
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-23 09:26:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.

Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 15:14:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.
Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
Hal and I are retired anyway, so staying in the house all day is
what we're used to. Being 77 and having CFS and chronic bronchitis,
I haven't left the house since the self-isolate order went out, and
I don't plan to until/unless we get the "all clear." I don't
even go to Mass any more, per bishop's instructions.

On the other hand, I live in a house with four other people.

Hal is 70 and still does some shopping; I don't know if the locak
Costco or Safeway is instituting early-hours-for-seniors-only or
limiting how many customers can be in the store at a time, or
anything. He plans to hit Costco today, so maybe we'll find out.

I work, not only from home, but from bed (chronic fatigue makes
one physically weak over time). I've sent out _The Golden Road_
to some beta readers and I'm beginning to plot a story about St.
Virgil Magus. And I play Lord of the Rings Online a lot.

And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.

Our son-in-law is working from home; Hal set up a collection of
hardware for him in their living room [reminder, we live in the
basement of their house]. At first he said he was delighted to
work away from the top-heavy collection of managers managing
managers, none of them with the sense God gave a goat. Now he
says he didn't realize how stressful working from home is.

Our daughter is still going out to work; she works for a lawyer
(and legal services are listed as exempt) and *can't* work from
home; there are documents to be physically signed from time to
time. However, all the courthouses in the Bay Area (AFAIK) are
closed for the duration, so she doesn't have to drive to them to
file papers (she has had to drive everywhere from Santa Rosa to
Redwood City, a range of about seventy miles, from an office in El
Cerrito). She still shops, and brings us fish&chips from Berkeley
on her way home. One of her other duties is to run errands for
one of the lawyer's client, an 80-year-old in an assisted-living
facility *to which she is now denied entry.* So she has to be
his IT consultant over the phone.

Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
James Nicoll
2020-03-23 16:25:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
My theatres have shut down, which is personally inconvenient but the right decision (ask
me about the Great Norwalk Outbreak of 2019!). Book reviewing, otoh, is ideal work for
home.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
m***@sky.com
2020-03-23 19:03:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.
Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
Hal and I are retired anyway, so staying in the house all day is
what we're used to. Being 77 and having CFS and chronic bronchitis,
I haven't left the house since the self-isolate order went out, and
I don't plan to until/unless we get the "all clear." I don't
even go to Mass any more, per bishop's instructions.
On the other hand, I live in a house with four other people.
Hal is 70 and still does some shopping; I don't know if the locak
Costco or Safeway is instituting early-hours-for-seniors-only or
limiting how many customers can be in the store at a time, or
anything. He plans to hit Costco today, so maybe we'll find out.
I work, not only from home, but from bed (chronic fatigue makes
one physically weak over time). I've sent out _The Golden Road_
to some beta readers and I'm beginning to plot a story about St.
Virgil Magus. And I play Lord of the Rings Online a lot.
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
Our son-in-law is working from home; Hal set up a collection of
hardware for him in their living room [reminder, we live in the
basement of their house]. At first he said he was delighted to
work away from the top-heavy collection of managers managing
managers, none of them with the sense God gave a goat. Now he
says he didn't realize how stressful working from home is.
Our daughter is still going out to work; she works for a lawyer
(and legal services are listed as exempt) and *can't* work from
home; there are documents to be physically signed from time to
time. However, all the courthouses in the Bay Area (AFAIK) are
closed for the duration, so she doesn't have to drive to them to
file papers (she has had to drive everywhere from Santa Rosa to
Redwood City, a range of about seventy miles, from an office in El
Cerrito). She still shops, and brings us fish&chips from Berkeley
on her way home. One of her other duties is to run errands for
one of the lawyer's client, an 80-year-old in an assisted-living
facility *to which she is now denied entry.* So she has to be
his IT consultant over the phone.
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread from people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be very careful about hygiene within a multi-person house. My impression is that people are worrying more about asymptomatic spread than they were - the official advice at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/transmission.html just says "Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads." but the document that scared the UK government into a tighter clampdown assumes at least pre-symptomatic spread "Infectiousness is assumed to occur from 12 hours prior to the onset of symptoms for those that are symptomatic and from 4.6 days after infection in those that are asymptomatic with an infectiousness profile over time that results in a 6.5-day mean generation time." from Report 9 at https://www.imperial.ac.uk/mrc-global-infectious-disease-analysis/news--wuhan-coronavirus/

I haven't seen the official NHS advice to vulnerable UK, but I believe that it amounts to suggesting individual self-isolation within a house. In Scotland, they are specifically advising aginst grandparents child-minding grand-children. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-51974969 ""To older people - we are asking you to stay away from your grandkids, from the people you love," she said. "That's hard. "
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-23 20:46:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.
Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
Hal and I are retired anyway, so staying in the house all day is
what we're used to. Being 77 and having CFS and chronic bronchitis,
I haven't left the house since the self-isolate order went out, and
I don't plan to until/unless we get the "all clear." I don't
even go to Mass any more, per bishop's instructions.
On the other hand, I live in a house with four other people.
Hal is 70 and still does some shopping; I don't know if the locak
Costco or Safeway is instituting early-hours-for-seniors-only or
limiting how many customers can be in the store at a time, or
anything. He plans to hit Costco today, so maybe we'll find out.
I work, not only from home, but from bed (chronic fatigue makes
one physically weak over time). I've sent out _The Golden Road_
to some beta readers and I'm beginning to plot a story about St.
Virgil Magus. And I play Lord of the Rings Online a lot.
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
This being science fiction, is that in the twenty-first
century before, after, or around now??
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Our son-in-law is working from home; Hal set up a collection of
hardware for him in their living room [reminder, we live in the
basement of their house]. At first he said he was delighted to
work away from the top-heavy collection of managers managing
managers, none of them with the sense God gave a goat. Now he
says he didn't realize how stressful working from home is.
Our daughter is still going out to work; she works for a lawyer
(and legal services are listed as exempt) and *can't* work from
home; there are documents to be physically signed from time to
time. However, all the courthouses in the Bay Area (AFAIK) are
closed for the duration, so she doesn't have to drive to them to
file papers (she has had to drive everywhere from Santa Rosa to
Redwood City, a range of about seventy miles, from an office in El
Cerrito). She still shops, and brings us fish&chips from Berkeley
on her way home. One of her other duties is to run errands for
one of the lawyer's client, an 80-year-old in an assisted-living
facility *to which she is now denied entry.* So she has to be
his IT consultant over the phone.
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
You stop? ;-)
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread from people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be very careful about hygiene within a multi-person house.
And about breathing.

Hand hygiene matters when you touch your face,
your food, your stuff, other people's stuff, or
other people. The virus (and also flu and other
inconveniences) doesn't infect through skin,
it is when it's transferred from skin to an entry
point that it gets you. Or, when someone breathes
it out near to you, and you breathe it in.

And first of all it has to get into your house...
riding on or inside a human being, usually.
Not animals, in this case (perhaps excluding bats),
but animals can deliver other germs. And they're
pretty lax about washing /their/ hands.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 21:15:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
This being science fiction, is that in the twenty-first
century before, after, or around now??
After. The Pandemic was at least several decades before the time
of the drop to the fourteenth century; there are old people who
were young adults at the time. A later book in the same series
is set in 2060.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
You stop? ;-)
*I* don't watch much television--we don't even have a TV
downstairs, but we have a bunch of DVDs that can be played on the
computer. But mostly we have kdfc.com streaming nonstop
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.

But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.

But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-23 22:04:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
This being science fiction, is that in the twenty-first
century before, after, or around now??
After. The Pandemic was at least several decades before the time
of the drop to the fourteenth century; there are old people who
were young adults at the time. A later book in the same series
is set in 2060.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
You stop? ;-)
*I* don't watch much television--we don't even have a TV
downstairs, but we have a bunch of DVDs that can be played on the
computer. But mostly we have kdfc.com streaming nonstop
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
Well, it's just adding up.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Bonus round:

Add the digits of each number in the table.
If that's more than nine, add again.
Pretty patterns (mostly).
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 23:22:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
Well, it's just adding up.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Add the digits of each number in the table.
If that's more than nine, add again.
Pretty patterns (mostly).
Well, I have pointed out to him that the digits of any multiple
of nine add up to nine; but since he hasn't got anywhere *near*
the nines yet, I don't think it sank in. Never mind; we have
time.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Woodward
2020-03-24 05:18:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Re: Dorothy J Heydt teaching grandson the multiplication table
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Ratios? Just what grade is he in? And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first? You can't divide without multiplication. I
don't remember which grade I was taught the multiplication tables
(perhaps 3rd, but not later, IIRC).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 14:42:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Re: Dorothy J Heydt teaching grandson the multiplication table
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Post by Robert Woodward
I
don't remember which grade I was taught the multiplication tables
(perhaps 3rd, but not later, IIRC).
I think 3rd for me too. Early on, anyway,
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Scott Lurndal
2020-03-24 16:39:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 16:56:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.

ObSF: Martin Padway's third career, teaching basic arithmetic in
sixth-century Rome.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Scott Lurndal
2020-03-24 18:04:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
Alan Baker
2020-03-24 18:09:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
I believe Dorothy is referring to the actual CONCEPT of multiplication...

...and perhaps the use of long multiplication to multiply numbers larger
than one's personally memorized multiplication tables.

It is of course utter nonsense to believe (if if one did read it in an
"article way back in [one's] childhood") that no one thought of this
until the the 1700s.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 18:43:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if
time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
I believe Dorothy is referring to the actual CONCEPT of multiplication...
...and perhaps the use of long multiplication to multiply numbers larger
than one's personally memorized multiplication tables.
It is of course utter nonsense to believe (if if one did read it in an
"article way back in [one's] childhood") that no one thought of this
until the the 1700s.
Multiplication - of integers, fractions, or decimals -
really is just addition of x instances of quantity y.
I think that adding 8 fives is easier than 5 eights,
but the basic reason for doing it is that there
are, say, 5 donuts in a box, and you have eight boxes
of donuts, and you need to know how many people you
should invite to an awful staff meeting. (With this
many people, it will be awful, even with donuts.)

In other words, how many donuts are in eight boxes.
When you add them up. Well, practically, you either
memorise all the answers, because it is handy to have
them in your brain, or you notice that 8 is 2 * 2 * 2,
so do 5 * 2 * 2 * 2. Or convert the numbers to binary
and so you only have zeroes and ones, i.e. 101 (five)
times 1000 (eight). Depending on how you come at that,
it's either 100000 plus 1000, or just put 000 on the
end of 101.
Paul S Person
2020-03-25 17:19:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
I believe Dorothy is referring to the actual CONCEPT of multiplication...
...and perhaps the use of long multiplication to multiply numbers larger
than one's personally memorized multiplication tables.
It is of course utter nonsense to believe (if if one did read it in an
"article way back in [one's] childhood") that no one thought of this
until the the 1700s.
Indeed.

As a perusal of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiplication_table
will show.

"The oldest known multiplication tables were used by the Babylonians
about 4000 years ago. However, they used a base of 60. The oldest
known tables using a base of 10 are the Chinese decimal multiplication
table on bamboo strips dating to about 305 BC, during China's Warring
States period.

As to the Western Tradition of DWEMs:

"The multiplication table is sometimes attributed to the ancient Greek
mathematician Pythagoras (570–495 BC). It is also called the Table of
Pythagoras in many languages (for example French, Italian and
Russian), sometimes in English. The Greco-Roman mathematician
Nichomachus (60–120 AD), a follower of Neopythagoreanism, included a
multiplication table in his Introduction to Arithmetic, whereas the
oldest surviving Greek multiplication table is on a wax tablet dated
to the 1st century AD and currently housed in the British Museum."

Of course, the vaguely-remembered assertion /may/ have been about a
specific form of the table; who can say?
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-25 20:19:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if
time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
I believe Dorothy is referring to the actual CONCEPT of multiplication...
...and perhaps the use of long multiplication to multiply numbers larger
than one's personally memorized multiplication tables.
It is of course utter nonsense to believe (if if one did read it in an
"article way back in [one's] childhood") that no one thought of this
until the the 1700s.
Indeed.
As a perusal of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiplication_table
will show.
"The oldest known multiplication tables were used by the Babylonians
about 4000 years ago. However, they used a base of 60. The oldest
known tables using a base of 10 are the Chinese decimal multiplication
table on bamboo strips dating to about 305 BC, during China's Warring
States period.
And Archimedes discovered *the concept of* positional notation,
only he was talking about base myriad (that's 10,000). I don't
think anyone ever took him up on it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
m***@sky.com
2020-03-24 19:41:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
The mechanical calculators so prevelent during the first four or
five decades of the 20th century could, for the most part, only
add and subtract. However, an instruction manual was provided
that described methods of performing multiplication (either by
pressing the repeat key and pulling the handle X times or using
an add and shift algorithm) and division (using 9s complement
addition, IIRC; it was fairly complex).
Some of them have a means for doing a multiply-by-ten left shift, which makes multiplication by additions more practical - see the instructions at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/brunsviga.html for multiplying 567 by 32 by cranking the handle twice for 2, shifting left, and then cranking three times for 30.
m***@sky.com
2020-03-24 20:15:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
ObSF: Martin Padway's third career, teaching basic arithmetic in
sixth-century Rome.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Should you wish to recreate a medieval counting house, there is a description in passing of a medieval counting board at http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/download/9477/9444/ which it appears might be summarised as an abacus on a table without strings, and I suspect dates back to Roman times. The article suggests that multiplication be performed by the method of 'duplation and mediation' which I presume is some variant of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_multiplication which I encountered under the name of "Russian Peasant Multiplication"
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 21:29:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
ObSF: Martin Padway's third career, teaching basic arithmetic in
sixth-century Rome.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Should you wish to recreate a medieval counting house, there is a
description in passing of a medieval counting board at
http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/download/9477/9444/
which it appears might be summarised as an abacus on a table without
strings, and I suspect dates back to Roman times. The article suggests
that multiplication be performed by the method of 'duplation and
mediation' which I presume is some variant of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_multiplication which I
encountered under the name of "Russian Peasant Multiplication"
Thanks; bookmarked. You never know what may come in handy.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-25 00:26:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Ratios? Just what grade is he in?
Sixth.
Post by Robert Woodward
And why didn't they teach the
multiplication table first?
Gods-be-feathered if I know.
Post by Robert Woodward
You can't divide without multiplication.
True.
Actually, it's straightforward to divide using simple subtraction, if time consuming.
True. ISTR reading an article way back in my childhood, so don't
trust this too far ... but it claimed that multiplication was
invented in the eighteenth century or thereabouts, and if you
wanted to find out what 5 x 8 came to, you had to add five
eights, one by one.
ObSF: Martin Padway's third career, teaching basic arithmetic in
sixth-century Rome.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Should you wish to recreate a medieval counting house, there is a description in passing of a medieval counting board at http://journals.socantscot.org/index.php/psas/article/download/9477/9444/ which it appears might be summarised as an abacus on a table without strings, and I suspect dates back to Roman times. The article suggests that multiplication be performed by the method of 'duplation and mediation' which I presume is some variant of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_multiplication which I encountered under the name of "Russian Peasant Multiplication"
So it was literally a multiplication table.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Paul S Person
2020-03-24 17:10:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 21:15:48 GMT, ***@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
Heydt) wrote:

<snip-a-bit>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
You probably already know this, but geometry uses ratios, and knows
nothing of multiplication tables.

But the school is probably using some New Math nightmare I would
recognize if I saw, but which I have never seen.

Somewhat closer to on topic, perhaps: the /Incredibles II/ movie
worked for me at the point where Mr Incredible mans up and starts to
actually be a parent, beginning by mastering the New Math so he can
help his son.

But then, I've always been a sucker for that sort of thing. /Dead
Again/ went from "well done" to "really good" about 3/4 of the way
through, when a fact was revealed that caused the entire movie to
rotate 45 degrees and march off in an entirely unexpected direction.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Well, good.

Nothing like keeping an honored tradition alive.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
William Hyde
2020-03-24 18:53:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
A friend was teaching mathematics at a junior college in the US five years ago. The subject was calculus, and the course outline stated that anyone who passed would be qualified to take second year calculus at a university. Nobody got in without high school mathematics.

He was more than a little shocked in a tutorial session to find that a student didn't know what 7X9 was. After all, he'd been teaching there over twenty years and never had that problem. When he mentioned this (naming no names) to someone else, he got the reply "About sixty, right?".
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Sounds like he'll be ahead of the curve.

William Hyde
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 19:04:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
A friend was teaching mathematics at a junior college in the US five
years ago. The subject was calculus, and the course outline stated that
anyone who passed would be qualified to take second year calculus at a
university. Nobody got in without high school mathematics.
He was more than a little shocked in a tutorial session to find that a
student didn't know what 7X9 was. After all, he'd been teaching there
over twenty years and never had that problem. When he mentioned this
(naming no names) to someone else, he got the reply "About sixty,
right?".
Well, it he planned to be an engineer, for whom pi can = 3 for
many purposes.....
Post by William Hyde
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
Sounds like he'll be ahead of the curve.
That would be nice.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Magewolf
2020-03-24 19:19:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
This being science fiction, is that in the twenty-first
century before, after, or around now??
After. The Pandemic was at least several decades before the time
of the drop to the fourteenth century; there are old people who
were young adults at the time. A later book in the same series
is set in 2060.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
You stop? ;-)
*I* don't watch much television--we don't even have a TV
downstairs, but we have a bunch of DVDs that can be played on the
computer. But mostly we have kdfc.com streaming nonstop
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Well, I learned them at the age of eight (IIRC), and that was in
1950. I'm cool on the eights, there are one or two sevens I
still have to stop and think about.
But the school Vincent attends is trying to teach him ratios, and
HE DOESN'T KNOW THE MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
But if this bug lasts as long as everybody is saying it will, he
WILL know it before he goes back to school.
"New" math seems to involve very little actual math.
Kevrob
2020-03-23 22:09:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens.
This can lead to gross miscalculation. :)
Post by Robert Carnegie
Not the last that I heard. It's a lot to remember
anyway and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Post by m***@sky.com
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread
from people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be
very careful about hygiene within a multi-person house.
And about breathing.
Hand hygiene matters when you touch your face,
your food, your stuff, other people's stuff, or
other people. The virus (and also flu and other
inconveniences) doesn't infect through skin,
it is when it's transferred from skin to an entry
point that it gets you. Or, when someone breathes
it out near to you, and you breathe it in.
I picked up some Clorox spay cleaner from the dollar
store. One formulation is for the kitchen, the other
for the bathroom. Both contain bleach. They are probably
the same stuff with different labeling! I've talked to
my housemates about spraying down surfaces, and leaving
dishes "until later" is being frowned upon. I've even
adopted the practice of cleaning up the pots, pans and
dishes used in prep before the dinner has finished. Some-
times you need to do that because you don't have duplicate
utensils. The local TV station I watch for news streams
those live broadcasts to an app on my phone, so I can clean up
and "watch the news" (listen, really) at the same time.
Post by Robert Carnegie
And first of all it has to get into your house...
riding on or inside a human being, usually.
Not animals, in this case (perhaps excluding bats),
but animals can deliver other germs. And they're
pretty lax about washing /their/ hands.
No pets, here, but one of the guys has his child visit, a
crumbcruncher of about 5?...7?... and those are notorious
conduits for bugs of all sorts. Maybe not so much if they
aren't going to school, daycare, etc......?

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 23:25:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens.
This can lead to gross miscalculation. :)
Well, we're in the US and I'm going to make him learn up to the
twelves. Whether he needs to or not ... Hal is handicapped by
*really* wanting him to be able to multiply and divide several-
digit numbers. But that will have to wait.
Post by Kevrob
No pets, here, but one of the guys has his child visit, a
crumbcruncher of about 5?...7?... and those are notorious
conduits for bugs of all sorts. Maybe not so much if they
aren't going to school, daycare, etc......?
Maybe ...

Vincent is twelve, and he isn't in school anyway, which is why we
have to keep running him through the numbers.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2020-03-24 00:52:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens.
This can lead to gross miscalculation. :)
Well, we're in the US and I'm going to make him learn up to the
twelves. Whether he needs to or not ... Hal is handicapped by
*really* wanting him to be able to multiply and divide several-
digit numbers. But that will have to wait.
Post by Kevrob
No pets, here, but one of the guys has his child visit, a
crumbcruncher of about 5?...7?... and those are notorious
conduits for bugs of all sorts. Maybe not so much if they
aren't going to school, daycare, etc......?
Maybe ...
Vincent is twelve, and he isn't in school anyway, which is why we
have to keep running him through the numbers.
The sisters and lay teachers like Mrs Cerro (2nd grade phonics)
drummed things like multiplication and division into us. They
also taught us short cuts. When I did some retail buying for
the bookstore chain I used to work for, I drove at least one
co-worker nuts when I told them to not worry about adding or
subtracting when figuring net prices of stock. You only needed
to do one calculation on your calculator, And for simple price
points ($10.00, $20.00) you shouldn't even need a calculator.
[Multiply list price by 1 - 0.XX re-expressing the XX% discount. ]

Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*

* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 02:45:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*
It's 54. Why should I be careful about 54?
Post by Kevrob
* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."
I un-rotted that and I still don't get it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2020-03-24 03:07:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*
It's 54. Why should I be careful about 54?
Post by Kevrob
* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."
I un-rotted that and I still don't get it.
The ultimate answer is "42."
42(sub 13) is....?

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 04:11:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*
It's 54. Why should I be careful about 54?
Post by Kevrob
* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."
I un-rotted that and I still don't get it.
The ultimate answer is "42."
42(sub 13) is....?
Sorry, that just went in one eye and out the other, I do not do
math in bases other than ten.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Scott Lurndal
2020-03-24 16:34:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*
It's 54. Why should I be careful about 54?
Post by Kevrob
* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."
I un-rotted that and I still don't get it.
The ultimate answer is "42."
42(sub 13) is....?
Sorry, that just went in one eye and out the other, I do not do
math in bases other than ten.
I think he's trying to make a Hitchhikers reference.
Kevrob
2020-03-24 00:52:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens.
This can lead to gross miscalculation. :)
Well, we're in the US and I'm going to make him learn up to the
twelves. Whether he needs to or not ... Hal is handicapped by
*really* wanting him to be able to multiply and divide several-
digit numbers. But that will have to wait.
Post by Kevrob
No pets, here, but one of the guys has his child visit, a
crumbcruncher of about 5?...7?... and those are notorious
conduits for bugs of all sorts. Maybe not so much if they
aren't going to school, daycare, etc......?
Maybe ...
Vincent is twelve, and he isn't in school anyway, which is why we
have to keep running him through the numbers.
The sisters and lay teachers like Mrs Cerro (2nd grade phonics)
drummed things like multiplication and division into us. They
also taught us short cuts. When I did some retail buying for
the bookstore chain I used to work for, I drove at least one
co-worker nuts when I told them to not worry about adding or
subtracting when figuring net prices of stock. You only needed
to do one calculation on your calculator, And for simple price
points ($10.00, $20.00) you shouldn't even need a calculator.
[Multiply list price by 1 - 0.XX re-expressing the XX% discount. ]

Be careful teaching Vincent what 6 times 9 is.*

* "V qba'g," ur [Qbhtynf Nqnzf] rkcynvaf va gur fcrpvny
srngherf bs gur OOP frevrf QIQ, "Znxr wbxrf va onfr guvegrra."

Kevin R
Paul S Person
2020-03-24 17:15:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens.
This can lead to gross miscalculation. :)
Post by Robert Carnegie
Not the last that I heard. It's a lot to remember
anyway and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Post by m***@sky.com
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread
from people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be
very careful about hygiene within a multi-person house.
And about breathing.
Hand hygiene matters when you touch your face,
your food, your stuff, other people's stuff, or
other people. The virus (and also flu and other
inconveniences) doesn't infect through skin,
it is when it's transferred from skin to an entry
point that it gets you. Or, when someone breathes
it out near to you, and you breathe it in.
I picked up some Clorox spay cleaner from the dollar
store. One formulation is for the kitchen, the other
for the bathroom. Both contain bleach. They are probably
the same stuff with different labeling! I've talked to
my housemates about spraying down surfaces, and leaving
dishes "until later" is being frowned upon. I've even
adopted the practice of cleaning up the pots, pans and
dishes used in prep before the dinner has finished. Some-
times you need to do that because you don't have duplicate
utensils. The local TV station I watch for news streams
those live broadcasts to an app on my phone, so I can clean up
and "watch the news" (listen, really) at the same time.
IIRC, the Army had a relevant slogan:

"Clean as you go, the mess you make will never show"

Strange to find it relevant after all these years.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
And first of all it has to get into your house...
riding on or inside a human being, usually.
Not animals, in this case (perhaps excluding bats),
but animals can deliver other germs. And they're
pretty lax about washing /their/ hands.
No pets, here, but one of the guys has his child visit, a
crumbcruncher of about 5?...7?... and those are notorious
conduits for bugs of all sorts. Maybe not so much if they
aren't going to school, daycare, etc......?
IIRC, at one time, I was told (or I read) that all the cold viruses in
the world hide in the noses of small children.

Just waiting to escape and infect adults, no doubt.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 21:59:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.
Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
Hal and I are retired anyway, so staying in the house all day is
what we're used to. Being 77 and having CFS and chronic bronchitis,
I haven't left the house since the self-isolate order went out, and
I don't plan to until/unless we get the "all clear." I don't
even go to Mass any more, per bishop's instructions.
On the other hand, I live in a house with four other people.
Hal is 70 and still does some shopping; I don't know if the locak
Costco or Safeway is instituting early-hours-for-seniors-only or
limiting how many customers can be in the store at a time, or
anything. He plans to hit Costco today, so maybe we'll find out.
I work, not only from home, but from bed (chronic fatigue makes
one physically weak over time). I've sent out _The Golden Road_
to some beta readers and I'm beginning to plot a story about St.
Virgil Magus. And I play Lord of the Rings Online a lot.
And I re-read Willis's _Doomsday Book_, which as you know, Bob,
is set partly in the fourteenth century during the Black Death,
and partly in the twenty-first with an influenza epidemic that
gets the city of Oxford quarantined, pretty damn efficiently--
but they had a pandemic (written with a capital P) within living
memory.
This being science fiction, is that in the twenty-first
century before, after, or around now??
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Our son-in-law is working from home; Hal set up a collection of
hardware for him in their living room [reminder, we live in the
basement of their house]. At first he said he was delighted to
work away from the top-heavy collection of managers managing
managers, none of them with the sense God gave a goat. Now he
says he didn't realize how stressful working from home is.
Our daughter is still going out to work; she works for a lawyer
(and legal services are listed as exempt) and *can't* work from
home; there are documents to be physically signed from time to
time. However, all the courthouses in the Bay Area (AFAIK) are
closed for the duration, so she doesn't have to drive to them to
file papers (she has had to drive everywhere from Santa Rosa to
Redwood City, a range of about seventy miles, from an office in El
Cerrito). She still shops, and brings us fish&chips from Berkeley
on her way home. One of her other duties is to run errands for
one of the lawyer's client, an 80-year-old in an assisted-living
facility *to which she is now denied entry.* So she has to be
his IT consultant over the phone.
Our grandson's school is closed, and we're supposed to teach him
at home, and he has, in theory, an email account at the school;
but I can't get the damn thing to log in. Hal is still
semi-conscious (it's only 7:45) so I'll get him to investigate
later. Meanwhile, I'm making him read a book (Heinlein, _Space
Cadet_) and I intend to buckle down and make him learn the
multiplication table, which he should've learned in third grade,
but they don't teach it any more. I am not looking forward to
this. What he WANTS to be doing is watching television nonstop,
You stop? ;-)
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
but, ha-ha, he can't while his father is working in the living room.
I imagine the multiplication tables still come up,
but since Britain theoretically is metric, I think
they could leave off at ten tens. Not the last
that I heard. It's a lot to remember anyway
and I'm still shaky on the sevens and eights...
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread from
people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be very careful
about hygiene within a multi-person house.
And about breathing.
Hand hygiene matters when you touch your face,
your food, your stuff, other people's stuff, or
other people. The virus (and also flu and other
inconveniences) doesn't infect through skin,
it is when it's transferred from skin to an entry
point that it gets you. Or, when someone breathes
it out near to you, and you breathe it in.
And first of all it has to get into your house...
riding on or inside a human being, usually.
Not animals, in this case (perhaps excluding bats),
but animals can deliver other germs. And they're
pretty lax about washing /their/ hands.
The only nonhuman animals in the house are two cats, who are
indoor cats and have never gone out of the house since they came
into it five years ago.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Garrett Wollman
2020-03-23 21:04:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread from
people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be very careful
about hygiene within a multi-person house. My impression is that people
are worrying more about asymptomatic spread than they were - the
official advice at
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/transmission.html just
says "Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there
have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this
is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads."
Our lab had a virtual lecture from Prof. Michael Lin (he of the famous
coronavirus slide deck that has been circulating online); he seems to
think that as much as 50% of the infected population may be
asymptomatic at a given time. You can download the lecture video here
<https://www.csail.mit.edu/news/hot-topics-computing-coronaviruses-and-covid-19-basic-biology-behind-epidemic>
(someone is working on getting it uploaded to YouTube but I don't have
that link).

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 21:07:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Hal and I are retired anyway, so staying in the house all day is
what we're used to. Being 77 and having CFS and chronic bronchitis,
I haven't left the house since the self-isolate order went out, and
I don't plan to until/unless we get the "all clear." I don't
even go to Mass any more, per bishop's instructions.
On the other hand, I live in a house with four other people.
Be warned that people are now saying that the virus can spread from
people not showing any symptoms, so you might want to be very careful
about hygiene within a multi-person house.
I haven't seen the official NHS advice to vulnerable UK, but I believe
that it amounts to suggesting individual self-isolation within a house.
Can't.
Post by m***@sky.com
In Scotland, they are specifically advising aginst grandparents
child-minding grand-children.
Can't; we're all he's got. His father is working full-time upstairs,
and his mother is going out to work in El Cerrito.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-23 22:00:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
I have a 3 miles bus ride to work, but I may cycle
when my pass runs out or the service does - it's just
slightly reduced at the moment. I may receive
alternative instructions. Almost everyone else
from the office is working from/at home, where possible,
as directed by our government. I'm also checking my
temperature before I go out; in the event of symptoms
I should self isolate.
Yesterday I went shopping, and did cycle, because
another instruction is that public transport is to
be used only for necessary journeys. My shopping
wasn't "necessary" yet, but I wanted to not miss
a weekly magazine. I'd better consider a subscription.
And I got quite an amount of groceries.
...and going to work tomorrow is doubtful:
the country has more or less gone to "REMAIN INDOORS."
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52012432>
<https://thatmitchellandwebb.fandom.com/wiki/The_Quiz_Broadcast>
Alan Baker
2020-03-23 16:58:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Your concern for losing your favourite restaurants is touching. I'm sure
it's for the people who'll lose their jobs and NOT for losing your
favourite dishes.

But consider that if (say) 60 people lose their jobs...

...might that not be a better outcome than 60 people losing their lives...

...or perhaps even a great many MORE than 60?
Paul S Person
2020-03-23 17:46:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 02:18:30 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
My life, as such, hasn't changed much, because I basically stay at
home and go out only to the grocery store, the drug store, the bank,
the barbershop, Subway, and a laundromat. So I'm neither stir-crazy
nor devoting time to cleanup, although I /am/ trying (as is normal
this time of year) to get myself back into the habit of occasional
yard work.

But there have been some effects:

* When I went to the laundromat yesterday, I found myself standing
outside while my clothes were in the machines (washing and drying). I
was standing because I don't have a car to sit in. This is fine in
March, when there is no rain, but next November, when it is dark,
cold, and wet will be another story.

* The grocery store is now confining all entry/exit to one door (I
wonder what the Fire Marshall thinks of that?) and using "sanitize"
and "wipe" (often in combination) as frequently as possible. They have
also stop putting purchases in re-usable bags, using paper instead. No
charge for the paper, however; I wonder what the City (which mandated
a 5-cents-per-bag fee some time ago) thinks of that.

*OTOH, for the things I buy, selection is not much affected. The main
exception is my preferred breakfast cereal -- but they run out of that
once or twice a year anyway. And the 0% milk was gone, forcing me to
drink milk fat (1%) for the first time since ... 1983. Logically least
but morale-wise the worst: the individual donuts are now available
only pre-boxed, in larger quantities than I wish to buy (I buy 'em, I
eat 'em -- the magic phrase is "portion control") and, of course,
boxed as /they/ wish not as /I/ would like.

* What next for the grocery store? Will they only allow so many of us
in at one time? Will they insist we "wait in our cars" while their
clerks pick out what we want to buy? Perhaps they will have us dress
in Moon Suits to do our shopping. Or convert to 100% pickup/delivery.

* I tested my electronic thermometer "just in case", diagnosed a dead
battery, and tried to find one to buy. The drug store does sell them,
and had a rack for them, but there weren't any there. Typical. Still,
unlike Barbasol shave cream and Trac II blades, at least there is a
/rack/ for the battery, should they ever get a supply in. They seem to
be a bit less fanatical than the grocery store, all things considered.

* My safe deposit box is unavailable because, although the bank is
open in the sense that it's ATM is well-stocked and it's Depository is
emptied. The lobby, however, is closed. This must cut down on their
mortgage business, which is a pity as the buying of houses (and so the
seeking of mortgages) continues.

But these are all minor problems, although I expect to find more and
more of them as time goes on.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
David Johnston
2020-03-23 18:06:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem.
You know toilet paper works for anything you need Kleenex for. Actually
better because it's less irritating for your nose.

I'm
Post by J. Clarke
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping. That coleslaw dressing in my fridge isn't
getting any younger people! Actually today I noticed to my alarm that
my 18 kilo bag of rice was nearly empty and I'd actually been watching
with amusement as a panic shopper zoomed past me with three bags of rice
on his cart. Then I remembered, "Oh right, I bought a second bag two
months ago because it was on sale. And I've got two more smaller bags
in my cupboard that I never got around to using."

Actually I'm a little worried. The virus is such a good excuse not to
leave the house even though there's no real problem here. I'm a little
too comfortable staying home. I've got to make myself go out today.
Garrett Wollman
2020-03-23 18:39:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.
Panic or St. Patrick's Day?

(Corned-beef-and-cabbage isn't actually Irish, they say, but it's
certainly an Irish-American tradition.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Kevrob
2020-03-23 21:55:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by David Johnston
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.
Panic or St. Patrick's Day?
(Corned-beef-and-cabbage isn't actually Irish, they say,
but it's certainly an Irish-American tradition.)
Boiled bacon (ham to us USIans) & cabbage w/praties is. CB&C
is a transatlantic modification. I put a bit of corned beef
in the crockpot yesterday, and have plenty of potatoes.
I may have a plate of that tonight. I am roasting a large
chicken, more spuds and carrots. I'll use a lot of that
bird to make soup.

I filed for unemployment electronically today. It may be at
least a week to hear that the benefits are coming. I set up
direct deposit. I am seriously considering looking for a job
with one of the retailers hiring. Even if I can't get a wonderful
job, just having somewhere to go will be a relief. I might try
work from home if it is offered. I've got decades of retail
experience in bookselling, and over the last decade in customer
service for a firm with clients doing web-retailing, catalog retailers
and direct mail /s/h/y/s/t/e/r/s/ marketers. If nobody wants to
hire someone who is 3 years away from Full Retirement Age,* I may
have to put in for my retirement benefits and take the hit. I'd
rather work past FRA to pump up my benefits when, I hope, I make it
to 70.

Kevin R

* That's supposed to be illegal, of course, but don't we all know
older workers who can't even get an interview?
J. Clarke
2020-03-23 22:29:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by David Johnston
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.
Panic or St. Patrick's Day?
(Corned-beef-and-cabbage isn't actually Irish, they say,
but it's certainly an Irish-American tradition.)
Boiled bacon (ham to us USIans) & cabbage w/praties is. CB&C
is a transatlantic modification. I put a bit of corned beef
in the crockpot yesterday, and have plenty of potatoes.
I may have a plate of that tonight. I am roasting a large
chicken, more spuds and carrots. I'll use a lot of that
bird to make soup.
I filed for unemployment electronically today. It may be at
least a week to hear that the benefits are coming. I set up
direct deposit. I am seriously considering looking for a job
with one of the retailers hiring. Even if I can't get a wonderful
job, just having somewhere to go will be a relief. I might try
work from home if it is offered. I've got decades of retail
experience in bookselling, and over the last decade in customer
service for a firm with clients doing web-retailing, catalog retailers
and direct mail /s/h/y/s/t/e/r/s/ marketers. If nobody wants to
hire someone who is 3 years away from Full Retirement Age,* I may
have to put in for my retirement benefits and take the hit. I'd
rather work past FRA to pump up my benefits when, I hope, I make it
to 70.
Kevin R
* That's supposed to be illegal, of course, but don't we all know
older workers who can't even get an interview?
Just an aside, but one of the things that SCSEP taught me was how to
write a resume that doesn't reveal your age. It worked. Google
"functional resume".
Kevrob
2020-03-23 22:39:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
............................................. If nobody wants to
hire someone who is 3 years away from Full Retirement Age,* I may
have to put in for my retirement benefits and take the hit. I'd
rather work past FRA to pump up my benefits when, I hope, I make it
to 70.
* That's supposed to be illegal, of course, but don't we all know
older workers who can't even get an interview?
Just an aside, but one of the things that SCSEP taught me was how to
write a resume that doesn't reveal your age. It worked. Google
"functional resume".
I've heard of those. Thanks for the tip.

Kevin R
David Johnston
2020-03-24 05:26:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by David Johnston
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.
Panic or St. Patrick's Day?
(Corned-beef-and-cabbage isn't actually Irish, they say, but it's
certainly an Irish-American tradition.)
-GAWollman
We're not exactly overflowing with offspring of Eire. Our immigrants
were Ukrainians. Mind you it's not like cabbage doesn't play a role in
Ukrainian cuisine.
o***@gmail.com
2020-03-24 19:34:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by David Johnston
It denied me cabbage! The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.
Panic or St. Patrick's Day?
(Corned-beef-and-cabbage isn't actually Irish, they say, but it's
certainly an Irish-American tradition.)
-GAWollman
We're not exactly overflowing with offspring of Eire. Our immigrants
were Ukrainians. Mind you it's not like cabbage doesn't play a role in
Ukrainian cuisine.
While in the Peace Corps in Micronesia, many of my neighbors were Filipino and SE Asian. I found that, with just three ingredients -- cabbage, soya, and peanut butter -- there are hundreds of recipies.
Titus G
2020-03-24 03:45:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It denied me cabbage!  The panic buyers cleaned out all the cabbage the
last time I went shopping.  That coleslaw dressing in my fridge isn't
getting any younger people!
There are still two massive green and three medium red waiting patiently
in the garden with a ton of silver beet, courgettes and tomato.
I cut a cabbage this morning and will cook probably half of it later
with cumin seeds, ginger, paprika, coriander and fish sauce.
( centercutcook.com ).
There have been reports of supermarket shortages here but I have not
seen any empty shelves.
Actually I'm a little worried.  The virus is such a good excuse not to
leave the house even though there's no real problem here.  I'm a little
too comfortable staying home.  I've got to make myself go out today.
I have spent the last two weeks with an infected scratch on a foot
requiring iv antibiotics and rest so already have cabin fever and now
the visits from friends has ceased. I have a dog to walk, tons of
provisions of all sorts and no concerns other than loneliness.
o***@gmail.com
2020-03-23 18:32:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
So, anybody else want to go?
We are retired.

I am a LAZY old guy, so I notice no difference.

Wife is a social person, so is JUMPY, is cleaning and rearranging EVERYTHING, on the phone constantly..... (I have hidden the knives)

We are well stocked with "stuff", including single malt.

Got a bazzillion books, both in dead tree and digital format, DISH, ROKU, and kinda OK internet speed.

My only problem is I can't go play with my runny nosed grand kids and great grand kids.
o***@gmail.com
2020-03-23 19:34:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Post by J. Clarke
So, anybody else want to go?
We are retired.
I am a LAZY old guy, so I notice no difference.
Wife is a social person, so is JUMPY, is cleaning and rearranging EVERYTHING, on the phone constantly..... (I have hidden the knives)
We are well stocked with "stuff", including single malt.
Got a bazzillion books, both in dead tree and digital format, DISH, ROKU, and kinda OK internet speed.
My only problem is I can't go play with my runny nosed grand kids and great grand kids.
We have no fuzzy, four-footed parasites to bother with.

Prescriptions come in the mail.

All bills are auto-pay.

But we did do pick-up at our favorite local restaurant Friday evening....these folks need support to keep them afloat.

(....wife going nuts, missing her hair appointments....)
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 21:17:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Post by J. Clarke
So, anybody else want to go?
We are retired.
I am a LAZY old guy, so I notice no difference.
Wife is a social person, so is JUMPY, is cleaning and rearranging
EVERYTHING, on the phone constantly..... (I have hidden the knives)
We are well stocked with "stuff", including single malt.
Got a bazzillion books, both in dead tree and digital format, DISH,
ROKU, and kinda OK internet speed.
My only problem is I can't go play with my runny nosed grand kids and great grand kids.
Right. Hal and I are confined with our one grandson (we have
another, but he lives in New York), so we have to cope.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Garrett Wollman
2020-03-23 18:35:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
It's been very weird.

I was on vacation last week. Originally, I was to be going to
Montreal to attend the World Figure Skating Championships all week.
However, that event was canceled (somewhat to my relief by the time
they finally got around to making the decision); I still needed to get
away from work for a while so I stayed on vacation, got up after noon
every day, and entirely failed to accomplish any of the numerous
things I probably should have been doing at home.

Even before my trip was canceled, the university had given the orders
for all undergraduates to go home (which mostly doesn't affect me;
research labs don't have a lot of undergrads). The directives have
gradually become more stringent, and last week they told all principal
investigators to submit plans to wind down their on-campus research
for the duration. Today, His Excellency the Governor ordered all
businesses in the Commonwealth to be shut unless deemed "essential".
Since I run the network for a major research lab that supports several
data centers and a hundred faculty who are definitely leading remote
learning for the rest of the term, I'm excluded from the governor's
order, but the Institute is asking everyone to stay home unless
absolutely necessary.

It has been a challenging few weeks for what is normally a residential
university to suddenly ramp up online instruction for classes that
were never designed for it, and the entire spring semester has been
designated pass-fail. I'm not sure what the Institute has done for
required laboratory classes that inherently require in-person access
to specialized facilities; it's been a big challenge for many of our
people (on the research side) to figure out how they are going to do
their research without access to their robots and 3D printers, but
many other people are just doing pure computation and only need their
GPUs and storage servers to stay online.

Meanwhile, I spent an hour today looking for paper towels (finally
found some crappy ones at CVS) and I'm now concerned about possibly
running out of toilet paper in a couple weeks.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
William Hyde
2020-03-23 19:16:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
I've had recent practice at this.

Last winter I had a persistent respiratory infection. I remained indoors from Jan 12 to March 12, with three brief trips out to get groceries.

Then I did the same from late June to mid August.

Now I am healthy (at least as far as I know) but stuck here again. I haven't left the house for nine days.

I need to get prescription cat food, and (in a few days) renew my own prescriptions. Phone calls today showed the vet to be open, the pharmacy closed. However, I can change pharmacies, but not vets, so actually that's all right.

William Hyde
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-23 20:32:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
I've had recent practice at this.
Last winter I had a persistent respiratory infection. I remained indoors from Jan 12 to March 12, with three brief trips out to get groceries.
Then I did the same from late June to mid August.
Now I am healthy (at least as far as I know) but stuck here again. I haven't left the house for nine days.
I need to get prescription cat food, and (in a few days) renew my own prescriptions. Phone calls today showed the vet to be open, the pharmacy closed. However, I can change pharmacies, but not vets, so actually that's all right.
William Hyde
In Scotland it's been suggested that prescriptions
(human) may take longer to fill in the circumstances,
so, submit them early, and with minimal human contact.

One of the stories on "Not Always Right" recently -
I think, but I can't find it again - was about
a veterinarian prescribing an animal's medicine
that had to be dispensed by a human pharmacist
(IYSWIM) - and the animal owner was quite confused
that their human health insurance (IYSWIM) wasn't
paying for it.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-23 22:08:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by William Hyde
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
I've had recent practice at this.
Last winter I had a persistent respiratory infection. I remained
indoors from Jan 12 to March 12, with three brief trips out to get
groceries.
Post by William Hyde
Then I did the same from late June to mid August.
Now I am healthy (at least as far as I know) but stuck here again. I
haven't left the house for nine days.
Post by William Hyde
I need to get prescription cat food, and (in a few days) renew my own
prescriptions. Phone calls today showed the vet to be open, the
pharmacy closed. However, I can change pharmacies, but not vets, so
actually that's all right.
Post by William Hyde
William Hyde
In Scotland it's been suggested that prescriptions
(human) may take longer to fill in the circumstances,
so, submit them early, and with minimal human contact.
One of the stories on "Not Always Right" recently -
I think, but I can't find it again - was about
a veterinarian prescribing an animal's medicine
that had to be dispensed by a human pharmacist
I've been there. I once had a cat with epilepsy, who had to be
dosed with phenobarbitol, which the vet could supply, and
potassium bromide, which the vet didn't stock. So I had to go to
a compounding pharmacy a bus ride away and have it specially made
up in capsules. They had a copy of a magazine article on their
front desk, about the time an elephant in the San Francisco Zoo
had been diagnosed with tuberculosis. There were antibiotics
that would deal with it, but apparently there's no way you can
persuade an elephant to swallow a pill. So this pharmacy where I
was getting Sebastian's potassium bromide made a mold (a pair of
molds, actually) for an elephant-sized suppository, which they
cast in cocoa butter, filled with the antibiotic, and turned over
to the zoo and let them figure out how to persuade an elephant to
accept a suppository.
Post by William Hyde
(IYSWIM) - and the animal owner was quite confused
that their human health insurance (IYSWIM) wasn't
paying for it.
Well, no. The animal wasn't on the list of persons covered by
the insurance.

I don't even remember if I *had* health insurance back when I was
dosing Sebastian. But if I had had, it would not have surprised
me that I still had to pay out-of-pocket.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-23 21:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
I am glad that I have plenty of TP at the house and the office. Having
people flush Kleenex into my septic tank systems at either could be a
disaster of smelly and nasty proportions.

Lynn
Moriarty
2020-03-23 23:33:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.

What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?

On a brighter note, I've just read an article on the importance of sex for couples in lockdown. I've helpfully sent it on to my wife in case she hadn't seen it.

-Moriarty
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-23 23:38:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
On a brighter note, I've just read an article on the importance of sex for couples in lockdown. I've helpfully sent it on to my wife in case she hadn't seen it.
-Moriarty
Be sure to let us know the results of that.

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-24 01:08:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Moriarty
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
On a brighter note, I've just read an article on the importance of sex for couples in lockdown. I've helpfully sent it on to my wife in case she hadn't seen it.
-Moriarty
Be sure to let us know the results of that.
Lynn
"Zz-zz-zz-zz..."
Kevrob
2020-03-24 00:08:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
I hope you realise there are British spellings. Then run spill
chuck to `Murricanise/-ize it!:)

I had too many "Pepsi Syndrome"* incidents with my laptop
keyboard. I bought a USB keyboard. I like the layout
better, anyway.

* https://snltranscripts.jt.org/78/78ppepsi.phtml

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
h***@gmail.com
2020-03-24 02:36:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
can you get a usb keyboard from somewhere and use it?
Post by Moriarty
On a brighter note, I've just read an article on the importance of sex for couples in lockdown. I've helpfully sent it on to my wife in case she hadn't seen it.
How's the couch?
Paul S Person
2020-03-24 17:31:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 16:33:40 -0700 (PDT), Moriarty
<***@ivillage.com> wrote:

<snippo>
Post by Moriarty
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
If the key top can be detached, you might be able to pop it off, clean
the gunk out and so restore it.

Then again, it could just plain be broken.
Post by Moriarty
On a brighter note, I've just read an article on the importance of sex for couples in lockdown. I've helpfully sent it on to my wife in case she hadn't seen it.
On a remote military base in the early 70s, the Army TV station went
out. Generator problems or something like that.

A lot of the married couples found an alternative form of
entertainment.

Nine months later we had a baby boom!
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Alan Baker
2020-03-24 17:47:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 16:33:40 -0700 (PDT), Moriarty
<snippo>
Post by Moriarty
Much the same as yourself. It's really weird which grocery items get cleaned out. The other day we couldn't get soda water! Which means we have drink our gin with tonic.
What's even weirder is that the laptop I'm working on has a non-functioning 'z' key. (I copied and pasted that one!) How am I going to work from home for months on end avoiding writing words with a 'z'?
If the key top can be detached, you might be able to pop it off, clean
the gunk out and so restore it.
Then again, it could just plain be broken.
You could also remap the keyboard to make some seldom-used key into "z"
Do you ever type "\" for instance, or if you're a Mac user, "«"
("LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK") is option-\.
Chrysi Cat
2020-03-24 07:47:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
*Me*, not much. I was a champion of social isolation _before_ this
month, who hadn't held down a job since 2006 and hadn't held down a job
for more than 2 weeks since 2004, with a failed second attempt at
college between those dates (basically, there are few jobs for an
autistic person who also needs intellectual stimulation. And then after
2009, I didn't offer a strong back even if someone _wanted_ to force me
to work menial jobs that would drive me insane during the workweek) and
had all of _one_ person she interacted with offline who was _my_ friend
rather than being a friend of my parents or my sister. The longest I was
spending in greater proximity than 4 feet _before_ this was when I was
in for dental work or various issues with my GP.

Now on the other hand, I live with my parents due to everyone involved
knowing that even were I to somehow manage to start drawing disability
_under Trump,_ I'm incapable of keeping house on my own for more than
about the 2 weeks that their vacations have maxed out at. And _they_ are
both going to turn 71 before May, with Dad additionally having worked
his way through college in a brake factory (though Mom and I don't know
any more about his health than that as he's notoriously private about it).

_He_ had been spending extended periods of time at our vacation condo at
the foot of one of the now-closed ski areas, and the original plan had
been, just before the governor asked that people stay the eff out of
Summit County, for him to return there for the following couple of
weeks. So he's getting stir-crazy.

Mom and I, meantime, had been in the habit of dining out once a week,
usually without Dad in tow, on a night other than Friday or Saturday
(though the last month before the closures, he came with us 3 out of 4
times). She's so insistent on that that two nights before the state
closed restaurants, we were eating at Outback (I _usually_ check in on
Swarm if for no other reason than to see if there's a member special
going on; for reasons related to "that auto-posts to Twitter", I skipped
that step that night). I have no illusions whatsoever that she'll pass
on going into restaurants again the second the no-dining-in order is
lifted, because she values the whole experience, not just the "eating
foods we can't cook ourselves" part, and is even largely passing on
takeout for that reason so far.

She prepares taxes; client contact is still done only in person and both
she and her associates-who-aren't-quite-employers are very clear that no
one in that discussion wants to set up her work computer so that she can
telnet in and basically use her home machine as a dumb terminal [and of
course, actually having _live data_ on the home machine would be even
less acceptable). I don't know what her response will be if the state
tries to stop her going into the office, since it has individual rooms
set off as offices rather than a 'modern' open-office plan and she'll
protest that means she's properly distanced.

We didn't do an emergency stock-up of _any_ sort, not least because all
of us are somewhat dependent upon being able to grocery shop at least 2
days a week if not more (though Dad is now ruling out Costco for the
duration as it's the only one keeping all its lines outside the store
for now, and he won't stand in line for three hours just to get in).
Softsoap is starting to hang around on the shelves for a short time, but
only the individual bottles and usually not in our chosen scents; it
looks like another week for refills. We have plenty of paper towels, in
part because I bought the last 8-roll pack of Bounty from Lowe's a week
ago Sunday, but we're down to just over a week of toilet paper and no
one realised that pasta and ketchup would be thin on the ground for a
while, so we have one box of the former and probably about a week's
worth of the latter (which means we're on the lookout for both). Our
bread situation will probably get us to past when it's no longer being
snapped up; there's nearly a whole loaf of Oroweat Oatnut in the bread
box and another in the freezer, along with the loaf of Oroweat Whole
Wheat that Mom had to settle for because as I was at the local
Kroger-affiliate snagging the last two Oatnuts, it was all that was on
the shelf at the Safeway by where she works (which would still have been
more than at the Safeway by where we live!). We have plenty of Minute
Rice, but very little in the way of Rice-a-Roni, Pasta Roni, or instant
mashed potatoes, and none of us are all that good at making white rice
palatable without a full preparation of a gravy or similar sauce that
pretty much requires a main dish. We haven't had _fresh_ potatoes in the
house in weeks and buy as few as possible, and pretty much plan to buy
fresh veggies every couple days at all times (we can_not_ grow them; the
deer problem in the entire subdivision is severe enough that a garden
would basically require a greenhouse.) We also didn't stock up on enough
frozen vegetables _yet,_ so we're hoping that a full lockdown doesn't
happen until after frozen-veggie supplies recover.

I'm semi-dependent upon pseudoephedrine, not so much to breathe properly
as so that mucus doesn't build up at the top of my throat and then core
my larynx down to layers that make it hurt to speak. I've been taking
two Mucinex a day, at least one with 12-hour pseudoephedrine, since
before I was fired from the call-centre job in 2004 (get an actual cold,
it goes up to two to keep the sinuses clear enough to not make me wish I
only had a migraine!). However, my _lower_ respiratory system last threw
flags sometime in the early twokays, with asthma that somehow eventually
cleared up entirely--I was even able to _jog_ part of the route between
Safeway and Wal-Mart on Sunday, which is at least 3/4 mile each way, and
while there was some "getting winded" more of the reason I called it off
is that my back absorbs shocks _very_ badly and I really need to get
into more high-energy _dancing_ than running or even jogging (blame the
congenital stenosis).

Pseudoephedrine is…a bit of an issue sometimes under normal
circumstances thanks to the Feds' obsession about not permitting anyone
to amass the raw materials for meth-cooking, It's _more_ of one when you
might at any point be forbidden to step out of the house for 15 days,
and there's a 17-day countdown between when one purchases one 20-pack of
pseudoephedrine and when they're next permitted to purchase one
(especially combined with _literally_ having to present one's photo ID
in person to buy, so you can't order it in). Thankfully, I have 9 left
from last month's, and purchased a new 20 on Sunday afternoon.

So outside of a lockdown commencing between 13 and 16 days from now, I
should be able to speak painlessly into May.

Of course, at this point, said lockdown would have to come from the
_state_ level, since Trump's going to order on a Federal level the
country _back to business_ on Monday instead.

I don't know what happens if any of us contract the virus either; I
should _survive,_ but I can't cook; I personally rate Dad's chances of
survival worse than Mom does, and if _she_ passes, I'm in dire straits
whether or not Dad does (she's the only buffer keeping him from likely
either throwing me out or worse, so him surviving without her is bad; I
also can't _cook_--I rely on frozen meals and deli salads when they're
out of town-- and the two of them are moderately more able to, so losing
them both would be even worse).

And did I mention that the website encouraging draconian measures says
that without at least a three-month-long shelter-in-place, the state
will be 70 percent infected even _if_ it practices social distancing,
and have no free hospital beds for a month?
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-25 03:03:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Me, my family, and my business are now in lockdown due to our chicken
little County Judge who is probably trying to earn some street cred with
his fellow dumbocrats here in Texas.
https://fbcoem.org/press-release-3-24-2020/

However, we meet the definition of "Essential Business" since we support
our customers who keep the energy infrastructure of the USA running. So
we are headed down that route.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2020-03-25 03:19:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 22:03:28 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Me, my family, and my business are now in lockdown due to our chicken
little County Judge who is probably trying to earn some street cred with
his fellow dumbocrats here in Texas.
https://fbcoem.org/press-release-3-24-2020/
However, we meet the definition of "Essential Business" since we support
our customers who keep the energy infrastructure of the USA running. So
we are headed down that route.
Welcome to idiocracy.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Alan Baker
2020-03-25 03:35:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 22:03:28 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Me, my family, and my business are now in lockdown due to our chicken
little County Judge who is probably trying to earn some street cred with
his fellow dumbocrats here in Texas.
https://fbcoem.org/press-release-3-24-2020/
However, we meet the definition of "Essential Business" since we support
our customers who keep the energy infrastructure of the USA running. So
we are headed down that route.
Welcome to idiocracy.
What would you do?

Would you just let everyone back to work?
Paul S Person
2020-03-25 17:24:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 22:03:28 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Me, my family, and my business are now in lockdown due to our chicken
little County Judge who is probably trying to earn some street cred with
his fellow dumbocrats here in Texas.
https://fbcoem.org/press-release-3-24-2020/
However, we meet the definition of "Essential Business" since we support
our customers who keep the energy infrastructure of the USA running. So
we are headed down that route.
Welcome to idiocracy.
What would you do?
Would you just let everyone back to work?
Trump (unless something has changed since yesterday) would.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-25 20:12:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Alan Baker
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 22:03:28 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
Me, my family, and my business are now in lockdown due to our chicken
little County Judge who is probably trying to earn some street cred with
his fellow dumbocrats here in Texas.
https://fbcoem.org/press-release-3-24-2020/
However, we meet the definition of "Essential Business" since we support
our customers who keep the energy infrastructure of the USA running. So
we are headed down that route.
Welcome to idiocracy.
What would you do?
Would you just let everyone back to work?
Trump (unless something has changed since yesterday) would.
As long as social distancing is practiced. It is better than chicken
fights on the beaches.

Lynn
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-26 02:51:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I'll start out.
I consider myself to be rather fortunate in that I have a job that I
can do as well from my living room couch as from my cubicle at work.
I'm also fortunate to work for a company that has rather deep pockets
so there shouldn't be any immediate layoffs. And that they are set up
to support working from anywhere for most employees. And that the
local governor seems to have decided that we are "essential" so the
government isn't going to shut us down. And I have enough toilet
paper and paper towels to last until some are delivered in early April
(confirmed in stock). Kleenex on the other hand may be a problem. I'm
a senior so I can use the early hours when the shelves haven't been
stripped by the hoarders. It's surprising how many seniors get out at
6 am to go grocery shopping.
I'm annoyed because I suspect that several of my favorite restaurants
will have folded by the time the governor decides to take his boot off
our necks, if he ever does, and I've done a lot of cleaning that I had
been putting off and I'm going a little bit stir crazy.
So, anybody else want to go?
In Minnesota, gyms have been closed for a week. Today I got one those pairs
of lifting straps at Home Depot that are sold as The Forearm Forklift(TM),
(as advertised on television!), and a nine pound "body bar" at one of the
Johnson's Fitness and Wellness stores. The bar seems to be solid steel
with a surface of resilient plastic or rubber. These are made in weights
up to twenty pounds and more, and people work out by swinging and lifting
them, often in group exercise classes.

By using the two straps to suspend the bar from the crossbeam of a swing set
at a neighborhood park, it is at suitable height for a pull-up bar. The
resilient surface gives a good grip (pull-up bars at a gym are often wound
with hockey grip tape). Sixty dollars total.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
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