Discussion:
RI April 2021
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-05-10 04:21:12 UTC
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Well, I had only one book in last month's tranche because it took me
an entire month to get through these six books; it's quite a long
series, but a worthwhile one. As usual, Amazon would like me to say
the link below is an affiliate link which could potentially earn me
some money if you end up buying something after clicking on it.

====

The Buried Goddess Saga: The Complete Series: (An Epic Fantasy Boxed Set:
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu

Book 1: Web of Eyes
Book 2: Winds of War
Book 3: Will of Fire
Book 4: Way of Gods
Book 5: War of Men
Book 6: Word of Truth

Liam the conqueror is dying. The king who subdued most of Pantego
in the god Iam's name is beset with a wasting illness that has
sapped both his body and mind. It can't be kept a secret any longer,
and the vultures are starting to circle. Perhaps if he had a ready
heir, things wouldn't be so fraught, but his son is years away from
majority, and his queen is foreign born, disliked and casually
cruel: half the Kingdom of Glass already thinks she has poisoned
him. The elites in the capitol of Yarrington know the situation
is dire.

Far away from the febrile atmosphere of the Throne, the populace
is not so worried, and life goes on. In particular, the little
Glass farming village of Troborough hardly notes the turmoil. The
crops must be tended, and the local tavern still offers drinks and
bards to the weary farmers between toil and bed. It's a bucolic
place, and one whose dirt Whitney Fierstown, who now styles himself
Pantego's greatest thief, was glad to scrape from his boots when
he escaped the farming life years ago. He's not sure what lark has
brought him back to the old place now; perhaps some desire to prove
he has made good, though his always fragile ego is bruised as nobody
seems to remember him in the first place. Perhaps it was a desire
to rub things in his unloved father's face, though circumstances
find both his parents dead of the plague. Perhaps it was the feeling
of one big thing left undone, one connection not made. At any rate,
it hardly matters why he's getting drunk in the local tavern when
an argument with a dwarf mercenary escalates into a brag that, of
course the greatest thief on Pantego could steal the Glass Crown
right from the king's head -- and with that drunken boast, the die is cast.

Torsten Unger is a knight, one of Liam's elite, and a pious and
stiff-necked scion of Iam. Born of foreign parents in the slums
of Yarrington, he was elevated to the nobility by Liam after, mostly
by accident, foiling an assassination attempt. Now, with the king
he idolized newly in the grave, he is chosen by the Queen regent
as the new Wearer of The White -- the Kingdom of the Glass's head
of military, she having sent his mentor and predecessor in that
office on a fatal quest to retrieve a doll that she, according to
the barbarian beliefs of her Drav Cra people, thinks contains part
of the soul of her son. Stolen by her scheming and still foreign
brother, she believes it contains the key to returning her son, the
young king, to sanity, the lack of which can not much longer be
concealed. Devoted to the late king as he was, and as enamored of
the Queen regent as he is, Torsten is still a good man, and there
are things he won't do, things the not doing of which see him
stripped of his rank, and decided upon the notion that even if the
idea is heathen, the doll quest must be undertaken if there is any
chance of saving the young king before his mother ruins the kingdom.
It's a quest whose completion will likely take a thief..

Sora is a Panpingese war orphan. Many such, their families lost
to Liam's endless wars of conquest, are scattered across the Glass
Kingdom, their succor secured by royal decree, but nothing can
secure their acceptance, and as very visibly different from the
common Glassian ethnicity, Sora has heard the epithet "knife-ear"
many times too often growing up. It certainly doesn't help matters
that she was taken in by a man the local villagers consider half-crazy
even if he does seem to know something of the healing arts, and it
would get her killed if they knew Sora has found the proscribed and
contra-Iam power of Blood Magic alive in her veins.

Why Iam would care about such is not entirely clear. Everybody
agrees that ages ago, there was a God Feud, that Iam won, though
he has not been much in evidence since, that Bliss remained also
on Pantego if changed and banished, that many minor gods were sent
to the nether realm of Elsewhere, and that Nesilia was buried but
not extinguished. Beyond that, the details are hazy, even, apparently,
to the gods themselves. Certainly the different churches have their
own spin, and the Drav Cra votaries of the Buried Goddess would say
that Iam's evil won, but that Nesilia will return. The dwarves
have their own god who was evidently not much involved as do the
Shesaitju. The Glintish don't worry much about such things at all
and take their pleasure in the world as it is and as it comes.

Whatever happened, it seems odd that the quest of three chance
matched companions for a possibly cursed doll could set in motion
things so as to make all of Pantego care about such events of the
dead past again, but then, as the Drav Cra say: "Buried, not dead."

This was a very enjoyable series, and I recommend it to you without
reservation. If you've read much fantasy, you can certainly see
echos of many other books in it, probably most strongly Martin's
"Game Of Thrones" and Tolkien's "The Hobbit" and even a bit of "Lord
Of The Rings". It is certainly not as grim as the former, nor as
richly imagined as the later, but it stands on its own two feet and
moves right along. The viewpoint characters are engaging, and
largely (if not entirely) likable even when at odds with each other.
They are also real enough that you often want to grab and shake
some sense into one or the other. There are enough surprising turns
as well to keep you on your feet. I admit there were several things
I absolutely expected to go another way, and after settling down a
bit I've decided the books were better for it.

Is this a perfect series? No. Some of the terms, like the slang
for excrement never really become natural, others like "Nigh'jel"
were a bit too facile. There are a few things that got a build-up
without a follow-through, and one character who should have been
there at the end for dramatic closure. At other times a character
will have an attitude that seems a bit too "modern". Also, for
whatever reason, perhaps because it was the scene they wrote first
and they were loath to change the initial impetus for the whole
series, the prequel which sets the stage is rather wooden and
plodding. As I had bought the omnibus 6 volume edition, I was
rather concerned that I had six books of such uninspired prose
ahead, and was seriously considering if I wanted to get into it.
Luckily I continued to the start of the action and things improved
like night & day.

Is this a very good series? Yes, and I recommend it without reservation.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-10 19:40:50 UTC
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Permalink
I find myself wondering what a "web of eyes" is. Or a "will of fire".

Where does a "web of lies" come from?
Perhaps from Sir Walter Scott?
<https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Marmion/Canto_Sixth>

"O, what a tangled web we weave,
When first we practise to deceive!"

I'm unclear what's going on there, and will
remain so, but my impression is that the speaker
has told different stories to different people,
and is anxious now that they don't compare notes.

This doesn't seem to relate to your books, though.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-05-10 21:12:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
I find myself wondering what a "web of eyes" is. Or a "will of fire".
Ah, it's very literal in the first case!

I didn't realize they all started with 'w' until I laid it out that way.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Titus G
2021-05-27 05:40:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/05/21 4:21 pm, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
some snippage for brevity
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
Book 2: Winds of War
Book 3: Will of Fire
Book 4: Way of Gods
Book 5: War of Men
Book 6: Word of Truth
Liam the conqueror is dying. The king who subdued most of Pantego
in the god Iam's name is beset with a wasting illness that has
sapped both his body and mind. It can't be kept a secret any longer,
and the vultures are starting to circle. Perhaps if he had a ready
heir, things wouldn't be so fraught, but his son is years away from
majority, and his queen is foreign born, disliked and casually
cruel: half the Kingdom of Glass already thinks she has poisoned
him. The elites in the capitol of Yarrington know the situation
is dire.
Far away from the febrile atmosphere of the Throne, the populace
is not so worried, and life goes on. In particular, the little
Glass farming village of Troborough hardly notes the turmoil. The
crops must be tended, and the local tavern still offers drinks and
bards to the weary farmers between toil and bed. It's a bucolic
place, and one whose dirt Whitney Fierstown, who now styles himself
Pantego's greatest thief, was glad to scrape from his boots when
he escaped the farming life years ago. He's not sure what lark has
brought him back to the old place now; perhaps some desire to prove
he has made good, though his always fragile ego is bruised as nobody
seems to remember him in the first place. Perhaps it was a desire
to rub things in his unloved father's face, though circumstances
find both his parents dead of the plague. Perhaps it was the feeling
of one big thing left undone, one connection not made. At any rate,
it hardly matters why he's getting drunk in the local tavern when
an argument with a dwarf mercenary escalates into a brag that, of
course the greatest thief on Pantego could steal the Glass Crown
right from the king's head -- and with that drunken boast, the die is cast.
Torsten Unger is a knight, one of Liam's elite, and a pious and
stiff-necked scion of Iam. Born of foreign parents in the slums
of Yarrington, he was elevated to the nobility by Liam after, mostly
by accident, foiling an assassination attempt. Now, with the king
he idolized newly in the grave, he is chosen by the Queen regent
as the new Wearer of The White -- the Kingdom of the Glass's head
of military, she having sent his mentor and predecessor in that
office on a fatal quest to retrieve a doll that she, according to
the barbarian beliefs of her Drav Cra people, thinks contains part
of the soul of her son. Stolen by her scheming and still foreign
brother, she believes it contains the key to returning her son, the
young king, to sanity, the lack of which can not much longer be
concealed. Devoted to the late king as he was, and as enamored of
the Queen regent as he is, Torsten is still a good man, and there
are things he won't do, things the not doing of which see him
stripped of his rank, and decided upon the notion that even if the
idea is heathen, the doll quest must be undertaken if there is any
chance of saving the young king before his mother ruins the kingdom.
It's a quest whose completion will likely take a thief..
snip
Whatever happened, it seems odd that the quest of three chance
matched companions for a possibly cursed doll could set in motion
things so as to make all of Pantego care about such events of the
dead past again, but then, as the Drav Cra say: "Buried, not dead."
This was a very enjoyable series, and I recommend it to you without
reservation. If you've read much fantasy, you can certainly see
echos of many other books in it, probably most strongly Martin's
"Game Of Thrones" and Tolkien's "The Hobbit" and even a bit of "Lord
Of The Rings". It is certainly not as grim as the former, nor as
richly imagined as the later, but it stands on its own two feet and
moves right along. The viewpoint characters are engaging, and
largely (if not entirely) likable even when at odds with each other.
They are also real enough that you often want to grab and shake
some sense into one or the other. There are enough surprising turns
as well to keep you on your feet. I admit there were several things
I absolutely expected to go another way, and after settling down a
bit I've decided the books were better for it.
Is this a perfect series? No. Some of the terms, like the slang
for excrement never really become natural, others like "Nigh'jel"
were a bit too facile. There are a few things that got a build-up
without a follow-through, and one character who should have been
there at the end for dramatic closure. At other times a character
will have an attitude that seems a bit too "modern". Also, for
whatever reason, perhaps because it was the scene they wrote first
and they were loath to change the initial impetus for the whole
series, the prequel which sets the stage is rather wooden and
plodding. As I had bought the omnibus 6 volume edition, I was
rather concerned that I had six books of such uninspired prose
ahead, and was seriously considering if I wanted to get into it.
Luckily I continued to the start of the action and things improved
like night & day.
Is this a very good series? Yes, and I recommend it without reservation.
I read the first book and did not enjoy it and am wondering if your use
of "prequel" above referred to the whole book?
I did not enjoy the authorial voice finding the writing often clumsy and
confusing.
Whitney on horseback at high speed has one hand on the King's Crown
which he is attempting to wrest off a dwarf riding on a wagon. Ignoring
any possibility of probability in favour of plot, the metal crown breaks
in half and Whitney loses his balance. It gets worse.
"Whitney slammed into the side of Liora Dodson’s pig farm, the roof
already alight. The smell of pork greeted his nostrils, confusing his
stomach."
I presume farm means barn.
Live pigs don't smell like pork.
Stomachs becoming confused?

They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)

Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
"The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.

And much more.

I agree with your judgement regarding the jarring of the excrement slang
and further comment that they seem to suffer from scatology. I thought
Whitney totally unbelievable, almost comedic but my main complaint was
the writing style and limited vocabulary.
(An aside. As well as in this one, a couple of other fantasy books read
recently, low status characters have had easy access to very high status
characters. Despite these being primitive societies, I find that
implausible as well.)
Ted Nolan
2021-05-27 06:26:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
some snippage for brevity
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
Book 2: Winds of War
Book 3: Will of Fire
Book 4: Way of Gods
Book 5: War of Men
Book 6: Word of Truth
Liam the conqueror is dying. The king who subdued most of Pantego
in the god Iam's name is beset with a wasting illness that has
sapped both his body and mind. It can't be kept a secret any longer,
and the vultures are starting to circle. Perhaps if he had a ready
heir, things wouldn't be so fraught, but his son is years away from
majority, and his queen is foreign born, disliked and casually
cruel: half the Kingdom of Glass already thinks she has poisoned
him. The elites in the capitol of Yarrington know the situation
is dire.
Far away from the febrile atmosphere of the Throne, the populace
is not so worried, and life goes on. In particular, the little
Glass farming village of Troborough hardly notes the turmoil. The
crops must be tended, and the local tavern still offers drinks and
bards to the weary farmers between toil and bed. It's a bucolic
place, and one whose dirt Whitney Fierstown, who now styles himself
Pantego's greatest thief, was glad to scrape from his boots when
he escaped the farming life years ago. He's not sure what lark has
brought him back to the old place now; perhaps some desire to prove
he has made good, though his always fragile ego is bruised as nobody
seems to remember him in the first place. Perhaps it was a desire
to rub things in his unloved father's face, though circumstances
find both his parents dead of the plague. Perhaps it was the feeling
of one big thing left undone, one connection not made. At any rate,
it hardly matters why he's getting drunk in the local tavern when
an argument with a dwarf mercenary escalates into a brag that, of
course the greatest thief on Pantego could steal the Glass Crown
right from the king's head -- and with that drunken boast, the die is cast.
Torsten Unger is a knight, one of Liam's elite, and a pious and
stiff-necked scion of Iam. Born of foreign parents in the slums
of Yarrington, he was elevated to the nobility by Liam after, mostly
by accident, foiling an assassination attempt. Now, with the king
he idolized newly in the grave, he is chosen by the Queen regent
as the new Wearer of The White -- the Kingdom of the Glass's head
of military, she having sent his mentor and predecessor in that
office on a fatal quest to retrieve a doll that she, according to
the barbarian beliefs of her Drav Cra people, thinks contains part
of the soul of her son. Stolen by her scheming and still foreign
brother, she believes it contains the key to returning her son, the
young king, to sanity, the lack of which can not much longer be
concealed. Devoted to the late king as he was, and as enamored of
the Queen regent as he is, Torsten is still a good man, and there
are things he won't do, things the not doing of which see him
stripped of his rank, and decided upon the notion that even if the
idea is heathen, the doll quest must be undertaken if there is any
chance of saving the young king before his mother ruins the kingdom.
It's a quest whose completion will likely take a thief..
snip
Whatever happened, it seems odd that the quest of three chance
matched companions for a possibly cursed doll could set in motion
things so as to make all of Pantego care about such events of the
dead past again, but then, as the Drav Cra say: "Buried, not dead."
This was a very enjoyable series, and I recommend it to you without
reservation. If you've read much fantasy, you can certainly see
echos of many other books in it, probably most strongly Martin's
"Game Of Thrones" and Tolkien's "The Hobbit" and even a bit of "Lord
Of The Rings". It is certainly not as grim as the former, nor as
richly imagined as the later, but it stands on its own two feet and
moves right along. The viewpoint characters are engaging, and
largely (if not entirely) likable even when at odds with each other.
They are also real enough that you often want to grab and shake
some sense into one or the other. There are enough surprising turns
as well to keep you on your feet. I admit there were several things
I absolutely expected to go another way, and after settling down a
bit I've decided the books were better for it.
Is this a perfect series? No. Some of the terms, like the slang
for excrement never really become natural, others like "Nigh'jel"
were a bit too facile. There are a few things that got a build-up
without a follow-through, and one character who should have been
there at the end for dramatic closure. At other times a character
will have an attitude that seems a bit too "modern". Also, for
whatever reason, perhaps because it was the scene they wrote first
and they were loath to change the initial impetus for the whole
series, the prequel which sets the stage is rather wooden and
plodding. As I had bought the omnibus 6 volume edition, I was
rather concerned that I had six books of such uninspired prose
ahead, and was seriously considering if I wanted to get into it.
Luckily I continued to the start of the action and things improved
like night & day.
Is this a very good series? Yes, and I recommend it without reservation.
I read the first book and did not enjoy it and am wondering if your use
of "prequel" above referred to the whole book?
I meant the prolog (which looking again I see is tagged as such)
"An ill King brings circling wolves" featuring Sir Uriah Davies
before his untimely demise. As I said, I found that part rather leaden.
Post by Titus G
I did not enjoy the authorial voice finding the writing often clumsy and
confusing.
Whitney on horseback at high speed has one hand on the King's Crown
which he is attempting to wrest off a dwarf riding on a wagon. Ignoring
any possibility of probability in favour of plot, the metal crown breaks
in half and Whitney loses his balance. It gets worse.
"Whitney slammed into the side of Liora Dodson’s pig farm, the roof
already alight. The smell of pork greeted his nostrils, confusing his
stomach."
I presume farm means barn.
Yes, probably.
Post by Titus G
Live pigs don't smell like pork.
I don't think they are all live at this point.
Post by Titus G
Stomachs becoming confused?
I don't have a problem with that.
Post by Titus G
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
I'm sure you're right, but the incontinuity didn't bother me. I
tend to race over descriptions, I suppose.
Post by Titus G
"The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
Post by Titus G
And much more.
I agree with your judgement regarding the jarring of the excrement slang
and further comment that they seem to suffer from scatology. I thought
Whitney totally unbelievable, almost comedic but my main complaint was
the writing style and limited vocabulary.
Whitney *is* comedic, among other things.
Post by Titus G
(An aside. As well as in this one, a couple of other fantasy books read
recently, low status characters have had easy access to very high status
characters. Despite these being primitive societies, I find that
implausible as well.)
Ah well. de gustibus I suppose.

If you didn't like book one after the prolog, you'll not like books two
through six either in my opinion.
Titus G
2021-05-27 06:52:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
much snippage for brevity
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.

My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
Post by Ted Nolan
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Post by Ted Nolan
Ah well. de gustibus I suppose.
Yes.
Post by Ted Nolan
If you didn't like book one after the prolog, you'll not like books two
through six either in my opinion.
Thank you.
Titus G
2021-05-30 01:00:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-30 13:10:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Or tall tales... all I can say is that this --> happens
a lot with dwarfs (and even more often without them):
<https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TotemPoleTrench>

So presumably someone thought the tall guy was
a number of shorter ones piled up?
Titus G
2021-05-30 20:13:45 UTC
Reply
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On 31/05/21 1:10 am, Robert Carnegie wrote:
snip
Post by Robert Carnegie
Or tall tales... all I can say is that this --> happens
<https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TotemPoleTrench>
So presumably someone thought the tall guy was
a number of shorter ones piled up?
Aaaarrrgghhh. Are you playing games with me?
No tall tales, not a fricken dwarf in sight.

My interpretation is that the authors were as careless with action
descriptions as well as continuity as they were with their vocabulary.
Paul S Person
2021-05-30 16:01:10 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Well, of course they were.

Apparently, however, they failed to suspend your disbelief.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-30 17:34:20 UTC
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Post by Paul S Person
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The Buried Goddess Saga: The Complete Series: (An Epic Fantasy
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable’s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Well, of course they were.
Apparently, however, they failed to suspend your disbelief.
Mystery (and soft-porn) writer Lawrence Block used to write
how-to-fiction articles for _Writer's Digest,_ which were later
collected in book form under the title _Telling Lies for Fun and
Profit._

The unreliable narrator, on the other hand, has a venerable track
record. Both Dante and Chaucer represented themselves as lovable
nitwits who took everything at face value.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2021-05-30 20:05:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The Buried Goddess Saga: The Complete Series: (An Epic Fantasy
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable�s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Well, of course they were.
Apparently, however, they failed to suspend your disbelief.
That was an attempt at humour. The next time you invent an anti-gravity
device in your garage, you should wear protection such as a motorcycle
helmet.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Mystery (and soft-porn) writer Lawrence Block used to write
how-to-fiction articles for _Writer's Digest,_ which were later
collected in book form under the title _Telling Lies for Fun and
Profit._
The unreliable narrator, on the other hand, has a venerable track
record. Both Dante and Chaucer represented themselves as lovable
nitwits who took everything at face value.
Paul S Person
2021-05-31 15:47:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
much snippage for brevity
Post by Titus G
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The Buried Goddess Saga: The Complete Series: (An Epic Fantasy
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
They are trapped in dog cages "intended to hold a dwarf" and in regard
to the thief, the smaller of the two, "If he laid down and stretched his
hands, every limb would be sticking through the bars." P 140.
Later, the giant of the two, the warrior, "stood, lowered his shoulder
and rammed into the gate as hard as he could." P 168.
(The DOOR has changed into a gate?)
The door of the cage is incorrectly renamed a gate.
My next moan was a separate issue which unfortunately also included
gates. Sorry.
Post by Titus G
Pressed his face between the bars of the tall gates. P139.
snip>> "The horse hurdled the constable?s wall" P 231.
What's the problem there? I believe 'hurdled' is the verb for a horse
jumping over something.
The problem is the horse being able to jump so high.
Upon checking, I find that hurdle (noun) is used for
a horse obstacle as well as for human running, but
I feel that hurdle (verb) refers to human running and
jumping in a particular style. I may be wrong.
Does the human high jump count as hurdling?
No.
Record horse jumps with rider are well over two metres
and the horse may be not able to see over or through
this obstacle. They jump when they trust and/or obey
the rider. Without a rider, they probably can go higher,
but whether they will is a different question. If they're
running at a wall then jumping is probably better than
not jumping.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_(horse)#World_records>
Despite being the same warrior who was able to stand up in a dog cage
built for a dwarf, the warrior pressing his face between the bars of the
TALL gates was 2 metres high so the walls would have been higher.
If you had read the book, you would have remembered that rather than a
lifetime of training, the horse had been borrowed seconds before,
(so not long to build trust), and that there were two people on it.
When magic was employed, it was always announced and explained. This was
not a magic horse. Neither did it have wings.
Ted Nolan enjoyed the plot and speed of events and I did as well but
whilst reading this fantasy, I couldn't shake the feeling that the
authors were making stuff up and telling me lies.
Well, of course they were.
Apparently, however, they failed to suspend your disbelief.
That was an attempt at humour. The next time you invent an anti-gravity
device in your garage, you should wear protection such as a motorcycle
helmet.
Now, that /was/ humor.

The first was, indeed, only an attempt.

This reminds me of my last manager (before I retired), who once told
us that it was only when her husband got sick that they found out why
doctors are only said to /practice/ medicine.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-28 10:33:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Whitney on horseback at high speed has one hand on the King's Crown
which he is attempting to wrest off a dwarf riding on a wagon. Ignoring
any possibility of probability in favour of plot, the metal crown breaks
in half and Whitney loses his balance. It gets worse.
I haven't read the book but didn't someone mention a
glass crown? Then again, king bling made from precious
metal is liable to be lightweight, to save money and also
considering that someone important is going to have to
west it, maybe for long sessions. Queen Elizabeth II
is troubled by crown ache. I think she sends the crown to
some events on its own and she stays home. Maybe not.
<https://britishheritage.com/royals/queen-elizabeths-advice-wearing-crown>
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
"Whitney slammed into the side of Liora Dodson’s pig farm, the roof
already alight. The smell of pork greeted his nostrils, confusing his
stomach."
I presume farm means barn.
Yes, probably.
Strictly a barn is primarily a food storage space,
grain and hay and such. You can put animals in too.
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Live pigs don't smell like pork.
I don't think they are all live at this point.
I think this in the sense of pork, er, cooking.
I've read that we smell good cooked too. :-|
Pigs are pork however, and there usually is
plenty of smell, but mainly because they are
kept penned up and can't go to the bathroom
in an actual bathroom.
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Stomachs becoming confused?
I don't have a problem with that.
Yeah, his stomach thinks it is dinner time.
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-28 10:46:06 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Whitney on horseback at high speed has one hand on the King's Crown
which he is attempting to wrest off a dwarf riding on a wagon. Ignoring
any possibility of probability in favour of plot, the metal crown breaks
in half and Whitney loses his balance. It gets worse.
I haven't read the book but didn't someone mention a
glass crown? Then again, king bling made from precious
metal is liable to be lightweight, to save money and also
considering that someone important is going to have to
west it,
!? wear it!
Post by Robert Carnegie
maybe for long sessions. Queen Elizabeth II
is troubled by crown ache. I think she sends the crown to
some events on its own and she stays home. Maybe not.
<https://britishheritage.com/royals/queen-elizabeths-advice-wearing-crown>
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
"Whitney slammed into the side of Liora Dodson’s pig farm, the roof
already alight. The smell of pork greeted his nostrils, confusing his
stomach."
I presume farm means barn.
Yes, probably.
Strictly a barn is primarily a food storage space,
grain and hay and such. You can put animals in too.
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Live pigs don't smell like pork.
I don't think they are all live at this point.
I think this in the sense of pork, er, cooking.
I've read that we smell good cooked too. :-|
Pigs are pork however, and there usually is
plenty of smell, but mainly because they are
kept penned up and can't go to the bathroom
in an actual bathroom.
Post by Ted Nolan
Post by Titus G
Stomachs becoming confused?
I don't have a problem with that.
Yeah, his stomach thinks it is dinner time.
Titus G
2021-05-27 06:40:33 UTC
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On 10/05/21 4:21 pm, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
much snippage
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Books 1-6)
by Rhett C. Bruno & Jaime Castle
https://amzn.to/2RGb8Xu
Book 1: Web of Eyes
I have only read book 1. I forgot to say in my previous post on this
topic that your introductory summary read a lot better than the first
book itself. I enjoy your writing and humour but our tastes in fantasy
seem very different despite agreement on Sherwood and Smith's science
fiction.
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