Discussion:
Why Science Fiction aliens should be afraid of Humans, not the other way around
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Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-01 01:23:40 UTC
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Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.

"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.

So this lists our first three reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans:
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree

What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Quadibloc
2018-12-01 03:35:38 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
If science-fiction aliens were genre savvy, they'd know the story they're in is
being written by a human. If John W. Campbell were the editor, things would go
even worse for them.

John Savard
m***@sky.com
2018-12-01 05:47:17 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
1) Humans evolved as persistence hunters - and some societies still are.
2) This gives me an excuse to explain my "Space Arian" solution to the Fermi paradox, which I have never yet seen refuted :-). The first council of Nicaea was held under the authority of, and with the direct participation of, Constantine the Great, and so could be considered as the expression of the dominant human culture of the time. At this council "The bishops first pronounced Arius' teachings to be anathema, formulating the creed as a statement of correct doctrine. When Arius and two followers refused to agree, the bishops pronounced clerical judgement by excommunicating them from the Church. Respecting the clerical decision, and seeing the threat of continued unrest, Constantine also pronounced civil judgement, banishing them into exile." So little green men have never declared themselves, because (unless they are orthodox trinitarians) we told them to get lost at a time when we had an organisation capable of making an authoritative statement, and we have never yet convincingly retracted this statement. (FWIW I am happy to speak with others regardless of their views on the trinity or their skin colour).
s***@yahoo.com
2018-12-01 14:14:36 UTC
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There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.

Nils K. Hammer
Cryptoengineer
2018-12-01 18:45:10 UTC
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).

pt
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-01 19:01:18 UTC
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Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Juho Julkunen
2018-12-01 20:37:19 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@loft.tnolan.com
says...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
On Marvel side Earth developed a reputation for repeatedly sending
Galactus packing. (And other things.)

Haven't read it myself, but I was reminded of a related incident I was
told about.

*Fantastic Four is menaced by an alien army*
Reed: "Wait, maybe I can talk to them with the Universal Translator."
*Army runs away*
Ben: "What in blazes did you say to them?"
"Reed: "I don't know, I only got as far as 'We are Fantastic Four of
Earth...'"
--
Juho Julkunen
Kevrob
2018-12-01 22:04:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
On Marvel side Earth developed a reputation for repeatedly sending
Galactus packing. (And other things.)
Haven't read it myself, but I was reminded of a related incident I was
told about.
*Fantastic Four is menaced by an alien army*
Reed: "Wait, maybe I can talk to them with the Universal Translator."
*Army runs away*
Ben: "What in blazes did you say to them?"
"Reed: "I don't know, I only got as far as 'We are Fantastic Four of
Earth...'"
Shi'ar starship bridge conversation from THE UNCANNY X-MEN back
in 1977:

"Our on-planet agent reports multiple instances of Kree, Skrull, Badoon,
even Celestial activity! Nothing for us to worry about -- Wait!
There's something more! Captain! This planet has faced Galactus four times
in its immediate planetary history -- and beaten him back!"

They flee.

http://www.supermegamonkey.net/chronocomic/entries/uncanny_xmen_104105.shtml

Kevin R
Quadibloc
2018-12-02 02:33:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
On Marvel side Earth developed a reputation for repeatedly sending
Galactus packing. (And other things.)
Haven't read it myself, but I was reminded of a related incident I was
told about.
*Fantastic Four is menaced by an alien army*
Reed: "Wait, maybe I can talk to them with the Universal Translator."
*Army runs away*
Ben: "What in blazes did you say to them?"
"Reed: "I don't know, I only got as far as 'We are Fantastic Four of
Earth...'"
Shi'ar starship bridge conversation from THE UNCANNY X-MEN back
"Our on-planet agent reports multiple instances of Kree, Skrull, Badoon,
even Celestial activity! Nothing for us to worry about -- Wait!
There's something more! Captain! This planet has faced Galactus four times
in its immediate planetary history -- and beaten him back!"
They flee.
http://www.supermegamonkey.net/chronocomic/entries/uncanny_xmen_104105.shtml
I could not find the panel you refer to on this page. However, a Google search enabled me to find this page, which indeed does contain it:

http://peerlesspower.blogspot.com/2016/10/where-goes-galactus-prime-directive-is.html

John Savard
Cryptoengineer
2018-12-02 04:19:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost
in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries
to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized
stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he
realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi
movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans
always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in
terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail
(eventually) and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever
becoming a member planet of anything). They never clarified *what*
the *something* was, but the big players knew it was there.
On Marvel side Earth developed a reputation for repeatedly sending
Galactus packing. (And other things.)
Haven't read it myself, but I was reminded of a related incident I
was told about.
*Fantastic Four is menaced by an alien army*
Reed: "Wait, maybe I can talk to them with the Universal Translator."
*Army runs away*
Ben: "What in blazes did you say to them?"
"Reed: "I don't know, I only got as far as 'We are Fantastic Four of
Earth...'"
Shi'ar starship bridge conversation from THE UNCANNY X-MEN back
"Our on-planet agent reports multiple instances of Kree, Skrull,
Badoon, even Celestial activity! Nothing for us to worry about --
Wait! There's something more! Captain! This planet has faced Galactus
four times in its immediate planetary history -- and beaten him back!"
They flee.
http://www.supermegamonkey.net/chronocomic/entries/uncanny_xmen_104105.
shtml
Kevin R
Not canon, but I liked this one....

klingons: okay we don’t get it

vulcan science academy: get what

klingons: you vulcans are a bunch of stuffy prisses but you’re also
tougher, stronger, and smarter than humans in every single way

klingons: why do you let them run your federation

vulcan science academy: look

vulcan science academy: this is a species where if you give them two warp
cores they don’t do experiments on one and save the other for if the
first one blows up

vulcan science academy: this is a species where if you give them two warp
cores, they will ask for a third one, immediately plug all three into
each other, punch a hole into an alternate universe where humans
subscribe to an even more destructive ideological system, fight everyone
in it because they’re offended by that, steal their warp cores, plug
those together, punch their way back here, then try to turn a nearby sun
into a torus because that was what their initial scientific experiment
was for and they didn’t want to waste a trip.

vulcan science academy: they did that last week. we have the write-up
right here. it’s getting published in about six hundred scientific
journals across two hundred different disciplines because of how many
established theories their ridiculous little expedition has just called
into question. also, they did turn that sun into a torus, and no one
actually knows how.

vulcan science academy: this is why we let them do whatever the hell they
want.

klingons: …. can we be a part of your federation?
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-12-02 14:54:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Kevrob
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost
in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries
to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized
stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he
realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi
movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans
always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in
terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail
(eventually) and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever
becoming a member planet of anything). They never clarified *what*
the *something* was, but the big players knew it was there.
On Marvel side Earth developed a reputation for repeatedly sending
Galactus packing. (And other things.)
Haven't read it myself, but I was reminded of a related incident I
was told about.
*Fantastic Four is menaced by an alien army*
Reed: "Wait, maybe I can talk to them with the Universal Translator."
*Army runs away*
Ben: "What in blazes did you say to them?"
"Reed: "I don't know, I only got as far as 'We are Fantastic Four of
Earth...'"
Shi'ar starship bridge conversation from THE UNCANNY X-MEN back
"Our on-planet agent reports multiple instances of Kree, Skrull,
Badoon, even Celestial activity! Nothing for us to worry about --
Wait! There's something more! Captain! This planet has faced Galactus
four times in its immediate planetary history -- and beaten him back!"
They flee.
http://www.supermegamonkey.net/chronocomic/entries/uncanny_xmen_104105.
shtml
Kevin R
Not canon, but I liked this one....
klingons: okay we don’t get it
vulcan science academy: get what
klingons: you vulcans are a bunch of stuffy prisses but you’re also
tougher, stronger, and smarter than humans in every single way
klingons: why do you let them run your federation
vulcan science academy: look
vulcan science academy: this is a species where if you give them two warp
cores they don’t do experiments on one and save the other for if the
first one blows up
vulcan science academy: this is a species where if you give them two warp
cores, they will ask for a third one, immediately plug all three into
each other, punch a hole into an alternate universe where humans
subscribe to an even more destructive ideological system, fight everyone
in it because they’re offended by that, steal their warp cores, plug
those together, punch their way back here, then try to turn a nearby sun
into a torus because that was what their initial scientific experiment
was for and they didn’t want to waste a trip.
vulcan science academy: they did that last week. we have the write-up
right here. it’s getting published in about six hundred scientific
journals across two hundred different disciplines because of how many
established theories their ridiculous little expedition has just called
into question. also, they did turn that sun into a torus, and no one
actually knows how.
vulcan science academy: this is why we let them do whatever the hell they
want.
klingons: …. can we be a part of your federation?
Heh. Saved to disk.

I was watching a batch of Doctor Who DVDs yesterday, and now the
answer is obvious: Earth is protected by the Doctor, and all
alien invasions will ultimately fail (he has documentation on
this), though it may take an hour. Or two.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-12-02 15:32:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
pt
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
And in the Marvelverse, too. The Sha'ir pursuing Lilandra, for instance.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
David DeLaney
2018-12-05 13:37:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
At one point the Dominators, who are exactly as nasty an alien race as their
name indicates (and who show intra-race status by the size of the red circle on
their forehead, conveniently) decided to come and test-to-destruction a random
sampling of these puny hu-mans. They knew about the propensity of Earthlings to
occasionally get superpowers for fairly random reasons, so kidnapped a group of
50, including Snapper Carr the old JLA "mascot" guy, and turned them loose in
a field of la-sers.

They expected maybe a 50% chance that one would survive by empowerment ... they
actually got _seven_. Each with a different survival method, of course.
"Snapper" got the power to teleport by snapping his fingers; one guy turned
into a crystalline version of a King from a deck of cards, while one of the
children got the power to become a living tornado of some sort. Etc.

(The in-world explanation was that much of humanity had a "meta-gene" that acted
a lot like the Wild Card Takhisian virus, minus the 99% propensity for sudden
strange death or jokerdom, in certain varieties of stress.)

Dave, mayhem ensued, exit the Dominators, metaphorical tails between legs,
suitably chastened for their hubris
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
David Johnston
2018-12-05 18:19:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I don't know if it's still in the current continuity, but at one
point DC comics had come to the point where aliens recognized there
was *something* going on with Earth. Yes, it's low-tech planet of
a minor sun in the backwaters of the galaxy, but for some reason
it has truckloads of super-beings, invasions always fail (eventually)
and sometimes it saves the galaxy (without ever becoming a member
planet of anything). They never clarified *what* the *something*
was, but the big players knew it was there.
At one point the Dominators, who are exactly as nasty an alien race as their
name indicates (and who show intra-race status by the size of the red circle on
their forehead, conveniently) decided to come and test-to-destruction a random
sampling of these puny hu-mans. They knew about the propensity of Earthlings to
occasionally get superpowers for fairly random reasons, so kidnapped a group of
50, including Snapper Carr the old JLA "mascot" guy, and turned them loose in
a field of la-sers.
They expected maybe a 50% chance that one would survive by empowerment ... they
actually got _seven_. Each with a different survival method, of course.
"Snapper" got the power to teleport by snapping his fingers; one guy turned
into a crystalline version of a King from a deck of cards, while one of the
children got the power to become a living tornado of some sort. Etc.
(The in-world explanation was that much of humanity had a "meta-gene" that acted
a lot like the Wild Card Takhisian virus, minus the 99% propensity for sudden
strange death or jokerdom, in certain varieties of stress.)
Well a fair number of people do become jokers. The Joker for example.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-12-01 20:33:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
There is, of course, this:

http://teal-deer.tumblr.com/post/57910877901/siderealsandman-friendlytroll-astrakiseki?utm_content=bufferb15db&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer

which used to be a fairly simple site till it got reformatted and
is now rather hard to read. Amusing, though. It mentions, e.g.
our history of pursuit predation.

"Humans can detect you even at night by tracking vibrations
through the atmosphere."

Of course, that talent can be used against us: vide Virgil Samms'
first trip in a Rigellian taxi.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-12-01 22:32:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
http://teal-deer.tumblr.com/post/57910877901/siderealsandman-friendlytroll-astrakiseki?utm_content=bufferb15db&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer
I hit the "consent to cookies and targeted ads, or spend half an hour
saying no to each one of our 1000 advertising partners" page, which
is "Something" I Do Not Need Right Now. So, thanks anyway. Really.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
which used to be a fairly simple site till it got reformatted and
is now rather hard to read. Amusing, though. It mentions, e.g.
our history of pursuit predation.
"Humans can detect you even at night by tracking vibrations
through the atmosphere."
Of course, that talent can be used against us: vide Virgil Samms'
first trip in a Rigellian taxi.
David DeLaney
2018-12-05 13:42:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
http://teal-deer.tumblr.com/post/57910877901/siderealsandman-friendlytroll
-astrakiseki?tm_content=bufferb15db&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter
&utm_campaign=Buffer

(which is the first hit on Google for 57910877901, by the way)
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
which used to be a fairly simple site till it got reformatted and
is now rather hard to read. Amusing, though. It mentions, e.g.
our history of pursuit predation.
"Humans can detect you even at night by tracking vibrations
through the atmosphere."
Of course, that talent can be used against us: vide Virgil Samms'
first trip in a Rigellian taxi.
"YOU GUYS I HEARD A HUMAN ONCE ATE AN AIRPLANE."

Dave, gods forbid aliens ever hear about Chuck Norris facts
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Greg Goss
2018-12-02 10:08:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
Beat me to it.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Robert Carnegie
2018-12-03 01:23:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
Fantastic Four #2 (1962) is similar.
<http://marvel.wikia.com/wiki/Skrull_Cows_%28Earth-616%29>
<http://marvel.wikia.com/wiki/Fantastic_Four_Vol_1_2>
Reed Richards uses /comics/ to persuade rather gullible aliens that
"the planet was too fortified by giant monsters for an invasion".

Not much later, it's revealed that the Fantastic Four collect
a fee for having their adventures retold in Marvel Comics,
and Mister Fantastic regularly visits Marvel's office to
pass on the latest news. So those monster comics may have
been samples.

Wait, though - if the _Fantastic Four_ comic is a non-fiction
documentary, maybe the others are, too.
Kevrob
2018-12-03 04:31:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the
greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a
giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He
laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no
comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
He'd viewed the "historical documents" :-).
Fantastic Four #2 (1962) is similar.
<http://marvel.wikia.com/wiki/Skrull_Cows_%28Earth-616%29>
<http://marvel.wikia.com/wiki/Fantastic_Four_Vol_1_2>
Reed Richards uses /comics/ to persuade rather gullible aliens that
"the planet was too fortified by giant monsters for an invasion".
Not much later, it's revealed that the Fantastic Four collect
a fee for having their adventures retold in Marvel Comics,
and Mister Fantastic regularly visits Marvel's office to
pass on the latest news. So those monster comics may have
been samples.
Wait, though - if the _Fantastic Four_ comic is a non-fiction
documentary, maybe the others are, too.
On Earth-616, but not here on Earth-Prime.

Kevin R
Lynn McGuire
2018-12-05 23:00:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of aliens
showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their cause. The humans
say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens release the bonds and
the humans follow them using the Earth as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/0345323904/

""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was strangely
muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they said they would."
Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if such it still could be
called—and joined the others who were now occupied at the fore port.
Below, great masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one.
In the middle of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible masses of
thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from the waters.
Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep
inner fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the
flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of coruscating
radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their moon along
also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an engineer. "A
moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of the Code, I
almost feel sorry for the Yops!""

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-05 23:14:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost
in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries
to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized
stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he
realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi
movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans
always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in
terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth as
a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/0345
323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they
said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if
such it still could be called—and joined the others who were
now occupied at the fore port. Below, great masses of puffy
white clouds. Brown and green land masses, unchanged. Blue
oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle of the planet's
second ocean, great, impossible masses of thick columnar
crystals began to leap upward from the waters. Translucent at
first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep inner
fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround
the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of
coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of the
Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship was
run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.

But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books. Maybe
they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-06 00:20:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans, lost
in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as mercenaries
to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with his moon-sized
stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on his ship until he
realizes they are from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi
movies but does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans
always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in
terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth as
a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/0345
323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they
said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if
such it still could be called—and joined the others who were
now occupied at the fore port. Below, great masses of puffy
white clouds. Brown and green land masses, unchanged. Blue
oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle of the planet's
second ocean, great, impossible masses of thick columnar
crystals began to leap upward from the waters. Translucent at
first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep inner
fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround
the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of
coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of the
Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship was
run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books. Maybe
they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became City Manager
and was executed off-screen by the time of another book get executed because
he bought a non-working invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which
later ironically turned out to work after all).
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-05 23:28:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with
his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on
his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen
all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the concept
of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible reason_.
The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/03
45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they
said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if
such it still could be called—and joined the others who were
now occupied at the fore port. Below, great masses of puffy
white clouds. Brown and green land masses, unchanged. Blue
oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle of the planet's
second ocean, great, impossible masses of thick columnar
crystals began to leap upward from the waters. Translucent at
first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep inner
fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to
surround the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in
blankets of coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of another
book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet, but
this appear to be the relevant passage:

"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call all
the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but deFord had
been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for engineering an
egregious violation of the city’s contract with a planet called
Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s police record which
the cops still had not forgotten. "

http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight

No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-06 01:43:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I have confirmed that this is the relevant passage from Earthman,
Come Home.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with
his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on
his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen
all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the
concept of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible
reason_. The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/0
3 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like
they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle
of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible masses of
thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from the waters.
Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse
with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and
finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere,
tickled, began to surround the flashing needles with auroras,
clothing them in blankets of coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of another
book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with a
planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-06 01:58:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
I have confirmed that this is the relevant passage from
Earthman, Come Home.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world
with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny
boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from earth.
He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for
no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the
rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/
0 3 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle
of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible masses of
thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from the
waters. Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers began to
pulse with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine,
and finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray. The
ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the flashing needles
with auroras, clothing them in blankets of coruscating
radiance. Following, the planet began to move after the
Tpin. On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing
their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light
speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of
another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with
a planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
I have found what you're thinking of, later in the same book:

******
“Perhaps so,” Amalfi said. “In that case, I’d better tackle Graf
Nandór right away with a fistful of accusations and complaints.
The more confusion, the more delay—and it’s less than four hours
to noon now. In the meantime, we’ll have to hide Schloss as best
we can, before he’s spotted by one of Hazca’s guards here. That
invisibility machine in the old West Side subway tunnel seems like
the best place … do you remember the one? The Lyrans sold it to
us, and it just whirled and blinked and buzzed and didn’t do a
thing.”

“That was what my predecessor got shot for,” Hazleton said. “Or
was it for that fiasco on Epoch? But I know where the machine is,
yes. I’ll arrange to have the gadget do a little whirling and
blinking—Hazca’s soldiery is afraid of machinery and would never
think of looking inside one that’s working, even if they did
suspect a fugitive inside it. Which they won’t, I’m sure. And …
gods of all stars, what was that?” ******

So, the invisibility machine that doesn't actually work, for real,
but that the bad guys will think does, to hide someone inside,
sold to them by Lyrans. One might infer that Lyrans are aliens,
but it isn't actually stated. Merely that they are Lyrans.

In searching for the word "alien," however, I do find this (also
in Earthman, Come Home):

"Amalfi’s first wild reaction was to wonder why the City Fathers
had been puzzled about the language. These were human children.
Nothing about them showed any trace of alienage."

which rather implies there *are* aliens.

And now that I think about it, the Vegans were pretty clearly not
human. From the beginning of They Shall Have Stars:

“… While Vegan civilization was undergoing this peculiar decline
in influence, while at the height of its political and military
power, the culture which was eventually to replace it was
beginning to unfold. The reader should bear in mind that at that
time nobody had ever heard of the Earth, and the planet’s sun,
Sol, was known only as an undistinguished type Go star in the
Draco sector. It is possible—although highly unlikely—that Vega
knew that the Earth had developed space flight some time before
the events we have just reviewed here. It was, however, only local
interplanetary flight; up to this period, Earth had taken no part
in Galactic history. It was inevitable, however, that Earth should
make the two crucial discoveries which would bring it on to that
starry stage. We may be very sure that Vega, had she known that
Earth was to be her successor, would have exerted all of her
enormous might to prevent it. That Vega failed to do so is
evidence enough that she had no real idea of what was happening on
Earth at this time ….”

—ACREFF-MONALES: The Milky Way:
Five Cultural Portraits

Further details on the war makes it pretty clear that the Vegans
are (were) not human.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-06 02:06:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
I have confirmed that this is the relevant passage from
Earthman, Come Home.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world
with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny
boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from earth.
He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for
no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to the
rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/
0 3 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle
of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible masses of
thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from the
waters. Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers began to
pulse with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine,
and finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray. The
ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the flashing needles
with auroras, clothing them in blankets of coruscating
radiance. Following, the planet began to move after the
Tpin. On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing
their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light
speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of
another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with
a planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
******
“Perhaps so,” Amalfi said. “In that case, I’d better tackle Graf
Nandór right away with a fistful of accusations and complaints.
The more confusion, the more delay—and it’s less than four hours
to noon now. In the meantime, we’ll have to hide Schloss as best
we can, before he’s spotted by one of Hazca’s guards here. That
invisibility machine in the old West Side subway tunnel seems like
the best place … do you remember the one? The Lyrans sold it to
us, and it just whirled and blinked and buzzed and didn’t do a
thing.”
“That was what my predecessor got shot for,” Hazleton said. “Or
was it for that fiasco on Epoch? But I know where the machine is,
yes. I’ll arrange to have the gadget do a little whirling and
blinking—Hazca’s soldiery is afraid of machinery and would never
think of looking inside one that’s working, even if they did
suspect a fugitive inside it. Which they won’t, I’m sure. And …
gods of all stars, what was that?” ******
So, the invisibility machine that doesn't actually work, for real,
but that the bad guys will think does, to hide someone inside,
sold to them by Lyrans. One might infer that Lyrans are aliens,
but it isn't actually stated. Merely that they are Lyrans.
In searching for the word "alien," however, I do find this (also
"Amalfi’s first wild reaction was to wonder why the City Fathers
had been puzzled about the language. These were human children.
Nothing about them showed any trace of alienage."
which rather implies there *are* aliens.
And now that I think about it, the Vegans were pretty clearly not
“… While Vegan civilization was undergoing this peculiar decline
in influence, while at the height of its political and military
power, the culture which was eventually to replace it was
beginning to unfold. The reader should bear in mind that at that
time nobody had ever heard of the Earth, and the planet’s sun,
Sol, was known only as an undistinguished type Go star in the
Draco sector. It is possible—although highly unlikely—that Vega
knew that the Earth had developed space flight some time before
the events we have just reviewed here. It was, however, only local
interplanetary flight; up to this period, Earth had taken no part
in Galactic history. It was inevitable, however, that Earth should
make the two crucial discoveries which would bring it on to that
starry stage. We may be very sure that Vega, had she known that
Earth was to be her successor, would have exerted all of her
enormous might to prevent it. That Vega failed to do so is
evidence enough that she had no real idea of what was happening on
Earth at this time ….”
Five Cultural Portraits
Further details on the war makes it pretty clear that the Vegans
are (were) not human.
I've always suspected that. I mean, not even *cheese*?
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-06 02:03:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with
his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on
his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen
all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the concept
of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible reason_.
The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/03
45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they
said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if
such it still could be called—and joined the others who were
now occupied at the fore port. Below, great masses of puffy
white clouds. Brown and green land masses, unchanged. Blue
oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle of the planet's
second ocean, great, impossible masses of thick columnar
crystals began to leap upward from the waters. Translucent at
first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep inner
fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to
surround the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in
blankets of coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of another
book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet, but
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call all
the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but deFord had
been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for engineering an
egregious violation of the city’s contract with a planet called
Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s police record which
the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the ironic twist
meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my traitor brain threw that in
on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-06 03:35:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world with
his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny boarders on
his ship until he realizes they are from earth. He has seen
all the old sci-fi movies but does not understand the concept
of fiction. Humans always win _for no comprehensible reason_.
The giant flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the Earth
as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp/03
45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice was
strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship, like they
said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to reality—if
such it still could be called—and joined the others who were
now occupied at the fore port. Below, great masses of puffy
white clouds. Brown and green land masses, unchanged. Blue
oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the middle of the planet's
second ocean, great, impossible masses of thick columnar
crystals began to leap upward from the waters. Translucent at
first, the chalcedony towers began to pulse with deep inner
fires: blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to
surround the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them in
blankets of coruscating radiance.
Following, the planet began to move after the Tpin.
On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing their
moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of another
book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet, but
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call all
the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but deFord had
been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for engineering an
egregious violation of the city’s contract with a planet called
Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s police record which
the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the ironic twist
meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my traitor brain threw that in
on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
Actually no, here it is:

"They have it. They almost had us. They don't keep their
bargains very well. They charged us with aiding Utopia;
that was treason, they said."

"What happened?"

"Doctor Schloss made the invisibility machine work Mark
says the machine must have been damaged in transit, so the
Lyrans didn't cheat you after all. He hid Doctor Schloss
in it-that was your idea, wasn't it?-and Schloss got bored
and amused himself trying to figure out what the machine
was for; nobody had told him. He found out. He made the
whole city invisible for nearly half an hour before his
patchwork connections burned out."
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-06 05:49:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world
with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny
boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from
earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for
no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to
the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The
aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the
Earth as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp
/03 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the
middle of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible
masses of thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from
the waters. Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers
began to pulse with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold,
carmine, and finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray.
The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the flashing
needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of
coruscating radiance. Following, the planet began to move
after the Tpin. On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing
their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light
speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of
another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with
a planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the
ironic twist meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my
traitor brain threw that in on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
"They have it. They almost had us. They don't keep their
bargains very well. They charged us with aiding Utopia;
that was treason, they said."
"What happened?"
"Doctor Schloss made the invisibility machine work Mark
says the machine must have been damaged in transit, so the
Lyrans didn't cheat you after all. He hid Doctor Schloss
in it-that was your idea, wasn't it?-and Schloss got bored
and amused himself trying to figure out what the machine
was for; nobody had told him. He found out. He made the
whole city invisible for nearly half an hour before his
patchwork connections burned out."
Odd. But still, so far as I can tell, now what deFord was shot for.
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-06 06:18:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world
with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny
boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from
earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for
no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to
the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The
aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the
Earth as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp
/03 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the
middle of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible
masses of thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from
the waters. Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers
began to pulse with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold,
carmine, and finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray.
The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the flashing
needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of
coruscating radiance. Following, the planet began to move
after the Tpin. On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing
their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light
speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of
another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with
a planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the
ironic twist meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my
traitor brain threw that in on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
"They have it. They almost had us. They don't keep their
bargains very well. They charged us with aiding Utopia;
that was treason, they said."
"What happened?"
"Doctor Schloss made the invisibility machine work Mark
says the machine must have been damaged in transit, so the
Lyrans didn't cheat you after all. He hid Doctor Schloss
in it-that was your idea, wasn't it?-and Schloss got bored
and amused himself trying to figure out what the machine
was for; nobody had told him. He found out. He made the
whole city invisible for nearly half an hour before his
patchwork connections burned out."
Odd. But still, so far as I can tell, now what deFord was shot for.
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
m***@sky.com
2018-12-06 12:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2 humans,
lost in the greater galactic civilization, were hired as
mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening a world
with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the puny
boarders on his ship until he realizes they are from
earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but does not
understand the concept of fiction. Humans always win _for
no comprehensible reason_. The giant flees in terror to
the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch of
aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to their
cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The
aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the
Earth as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/dp
/03 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined the
others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below, great
masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land masses,
unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In the
middle of the planet's second ocean, great, impossible
masses of thick columnar crystals began to leap upward from
the waters. Translucent at first, the chalcedony towers
began to pulse with deep inner fires: blue, purple, gold,
carmine, and finally a strange, yet familiar silver-gray.
The ionosphere, tickled, began to surround the flashing
needles with auroras, clothing them in blankets of
coruscating radiance. Following, the planet began to move
after the Tpin. On board the cruiser it was very quiet.
"I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that they are bringing
their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg of
the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light
speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of
another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new tablet,
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for a
while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to call
all the familiar things now that they had turned strange—but
deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around 3300 for
engineering an egregious violation of the city’s contract with
a planet called Epoch, which had put a black mark on the city’s
police record which the cops still had not forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I get
home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the
ironic twist meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my
traitor brain threw that in on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
"They have it. They almost had us. They don't keep their
bargains very well. They charged us with aiding Utopia;
that was treason, they said."
"What happened?"
"Doctor Schloss made the invisibility machine work Mark
says the machine must have been damaged in transit, so the
Lyrans didn't cheat you after all. He hid Doctor Schloss
in it-that was your idea, wasn't it?-and Schloss got bored
and amused himself trying to figure out what the machine
was for; nobody had told him. He found out. He made the
whole city invisible for nearly half an hour before his
patchwork connections burned out."
Odd. But still, so far as I can tell, now what deFord was shot for.
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
I have an omnibus volume of "Cities In Flight" which has earned its place on my bookshelves through rereadings more than most. It presents itself as a study of the rise and fall of the Human culture, and we don't see many encounters with aliens, but I think they are there. The Vegans which preceded humanity are non-human, as is the Web of Hercules which was in the process of supplanting them. In "Earthman come home" I think Doctor Beetle, referred to as the Myrdian in the tank, who was taken to have invented a no-fuel drive was not human. Of course, the perspective from which we read "The Triumph of Time"/"A clash of cymbals" suggests that _we_ are not the humanity recorded in the books.
David DeLaney
2018-12-06 23:48:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
I have an omnibus volume of "Cities In Flight" which has earned its place on
my bookshelves through rereadings more than most. It presents itself as a
study of the rise and fall of the Human culture, and we don't see many
encounters with aliens, but I think they are there. The Vegans which preceded
humanity are non-human, as is the Web of Hercules which was in the process of
supplanting them. In "Earthman come home" I think Doctor Beetle, referred to
as the Myrdian in the tank, who was taken to have invented a no-fuel drive was
not human. Of course, the perspective from which we read "The Triumph of
Time"/"A clash of cymbals" suggests that _we_ are not the humanity recorded in
the books.

Okay, I accept this correction, because I do remember most of that now that
I've been poked. But a I noted upthread, "interaction with aliens" / "first
contact with aliens" / "look how alien we can make this alien society the
Earthmen are plunked into" wasn't ever really the base for any of the main
story plots. It only ever really got as far as "ha ha Vegans don't understand
Peoples Of Earth look how we can outplot them".

Note: if you have the omnibus volume? He had to edit the timeline for some
reason, apparently there wan't enough time for everything to happen according
to the original chronology. The last book gets another eschatological (right
word?) connection if you realize the nothing-probe was _originally_ called
Object Four Thousand And Four Aleph-Null [approx.]. The extra hundred years
spoiled it.

Dave, so kids, always check you've mapped out your timeline first. ESPECIALLY
if Time Travel or Ms. Aoyama are going to be involved anywhere
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-06 22:37:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by s***@yahoo.com
There was an issue of Heavy Metal magazine where 2
humans, lost in the greater galactic civilization, were
hired as mercenaries to defeat a giant alien threatening
a world with his moon-sized stink bomb. He laughs at the
puny boarders on his ship until he realizes they are
from earth. He has seen all the old sci-fi movies but
does not understand the concept of fiction. Humans
always win _for no comprehensible reason_. The giant
flees in terror to the rest room.
Nils K. Hammer
Alana Dean Foster has a great short story about a bunch
of aliens showing up at Earth to recruit the humans to
their cause.
The humans say sure once you release our bonds. The
aliens
release the bonds and the humans follow them using the
Earth as a space ship. And the Moon.
https://www.amazon.com/Friends-Like-These-Alan-Foster/
dp /03 45 323904/
""Sir," began Zinin to the commander, and his great voice
was strangely muffled, "they're coming... in their ship,
like they said they would." Phrnnx yanked himself back to
reality—if such it still could be called—and joined
the others who were now occupied at the fore port. Below,
great masses of puffy white clouds. Brown and green land
masses, unchanged. Blue oceans, unchanged. Except one. In
the middle of the planet's second ocean, great,
impossible masses of thick columnar crystals began to
leap upward from the waters. Translucent at first, the
blue, purple, gold, carmine, and finally a strange, yet
familiar silver-gray. The ionosphere, tickled, began to
surround the flashing needles with auroras, clothing them
in blankets of coruscating radiance. Following, the
planet began to move after the Tpin. On board the cruiser
it was very quiet. "I see," whispered Rappan idly, "that
they are bringing their moon along also."
"You get accustomed to something like that," breathed an
engineer. "A moon, I mean."
Old Alo was making mystic signs with his tentacles. "Egg
of the Code, I almost feel sorry for the Yops!""
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan
battleship was run down by a planet traveling at faster
than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed
hidden.
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually
became City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time
of another book get executed
That part I remember.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
That, I do not. I don't have a copy with me on the new
"His first city manager had been a man named deFord, who for
a while had shared Amalfi’s amused puzzlement about what to
call all the familiar things now that they had turned
strange—but deFord had been shot by the City Fathers around
3300 for engineering an egregious violation of the city’s
contract with a planet called Epoch, which had put a black
mark on the city’s police record which the cops still had not
forgotten. "
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
No mention of aliens. I'll check it (if I remember) when I
get home.
Well, I could be wrong after so many years. I thought the
ironic twist meant it was probably a true memory, but maybe my
traitor brain threw that in on purpose so I would fall for it.
--
"They have it. They almost had us. They don't keep their
bargains very well. They charged us with aiding Utopia;
that was treason, they said."
"What happened?"
"Doctor Schloss made the invisibility machine work Mark
says the machine must have been damaged in transit, so
the Lyrans didn't cheat you after all. He hid Doctor
Schloss in it-that was your idea, wasn't it?-and Schloss
got bored and amused himself trying to figure out what
the machine was for; nobody had told him. He found out.
He made the whole city invisible for nearly half an hour
before his patchwork connections burned out."
Odd. But still, so far as I can tell, now what deFord was shot
for. I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that
we can argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the
last book not much at all,
I supposed that depends on which "first" and "last" you mean. IIRC,
they weren't written in chronological order.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
but I wonder what I would think of it
as an adult (or at least as an obsolete kid).
I've reread them a few times over the years. The science is . . .
golden age, space opera goofy, but the stories hold up reasonably
well for what they are.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2018-12-07 06:03:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
Hmmm. I liked the second and third, and the last not at all. But the
first was just "meh".
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-12-07 06:13:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
Hmmm. I liked the second and third, and the last not at all. But the
first was just "meh".
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.

It was kinda like a Heinlein juvenile.

(It was also the first place I ever heard of "press gangs" and "impression".
The guy tells the kid (approx) "we're authorized to impress anyone we find
out here" and I'm like, "Huh. That seems like an odd use of time.")
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Greg Goss
2018-12-07 06:44:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
Hmmm. I liked the second and third, and the last not at all. But the
first was just "meh".
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
It was kinda like a Heinlein juvenile.
OK. I'm a big fan of the Heinlein juvies, and that was my fave of the
four of them.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
D B Davis
2018-12-07 15:20:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
http://you-books.com/book/J-Blish/Cities-in-Flight
I suspect we should both reread the entire series, so that we can
argue from greater ignorance.
Heh. Yep. I remember liking the first book quite a lot and the last
book not much at all, but I wonder what I would think of it as an adult (or
at least as an obsolete kid).
Hmmm. I liked the second and third, and the last not at all. But the
first was just "meh".
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
It was kinda like a Heinlein juvenile.
(It was also the first place I ever heard of "press gangs" and "impression".
The guy tells the kid (approx) "we're authorized to impress anyone we find
out here" and I'm like, "Huh. That seems like an odd use of time.")
They taught me about press gangs and impression in middle school. They
downplayed the slavery aspect of the practice at that time. A variation
of the practice still occurs today:

More than 2,000 fishermen have been rescued this year from
brutal conditions at sea, liberated as a result of an
Associated Press investigation into seafood brought to the
U.S. from a slave island in eastern Indonesia. ...

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=More+than+2,000+fishermen+have+been

When impression happens on land they call it conscription. For instance,
when Lincoln's conscripted slaves fought to the death against Davis'
conscripted slaves to free the slaves (from their mortal coil) [1].

Note.

1. An excerpt from the Dune Mini-series Hollywood treatment:

INT. DUKE LETO'S OFFICE - DAWN

The Duke is propped up at his desk. A glazed look in his
eyes. Clearly paralyzed but alert. He can SEE....

BARON HARKONNEN across the room. With DeVries.
And several other Harkonnen guards. And...

DR. YUEH. Agitated.

DR. YUEH
...my half of the bargain, Baron. I
promised you the Duke, and there he is...

BARON HARKONNEN
And a delicious sight it is, Doctor.

DR. YUEH
...now it's time for your half.

BARON HARKONNEN
And...believe it or not...I'm a man of my
word.

DR. YUEH
Where is she!? You promised we'd be
reunited. You said you'd free her if I
did what you asked.

BARON HARKONNEN
Your wife is free, my good doctor.
Completely free...
And he floats across the room to a large draped object.
Yanks the velvet curtains away to REVEAL...
A glass SARCOPHAGUS. And a beautiful woman inside.
Clearly dead!

BARON HARKONNEN
...free of her mortal coil...free of her
physical cage. I freed her.

http://duneinfo.com/Content/files/frank-herberts-dune-1.pdf



Thank you,
--
Don
Robert Carnegie
2018-12-07 20:47:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I've been told that actual press gangs only recruited
existing reservists and deserters. I doubt this, but
those are the people who would have relevant skills.
William Hyde
2018-12-07 20:51:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
I've been told that actual press gangs only recruited
existing reservists and deserters.
That is certainly not true.

William Hyde
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-07 20:39:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
I've been told that actual press gangs only recruited
existing reservists and deserters.
That is certainly not true.
Well, of course they were all deserters. Eventually. The press gangs
were just punishing them preemptively, for the sins everyone knew
they would commit.

(I have no doubt they made that claim, though.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
David DeLaney
2018-12-07 15:21:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
That was the second, A Life for the Stars. The first was about building the
Bridge on Jupiter, during a period when stricter and stricter thought control
was stifling US science and turning it into the equivalent of another Commie
country, complete with a Senator Proxmire expy. The Bridge's actual purpose was
testing the spindizzy equations in a way that couldn't be done on Earth. This
was They Shall Have Stars.

Dave, whyyy do I remember these things?
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-07 15:33:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto
Scranton-aloft.
That was the second, A Life for the Stars.
But the last written (or at least the last published.

The publication order (according to Wikipedia) is:

Earthman, Come Home (1955)
They Shall Have Stars (1956)
A Clash of Cymbals/The Triumph of Time (1959)
A Life for the Stars (1962)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Michael F. Stemper
2018-12-08 18:39:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
That was the second, A Life for the Stars. The first was about building the
Bridge on Jupiter, during a period when stricter and stricter thought control
was stifling US science and turning it into the equivalent of another Commie
country, complete with a Senator Proxmire expy.
s/Proxmire/McCarthy/

Although they were both U.S. senators from Wisconsin, that's about
the only thing that they had in common. "MacHinery" was definitely
a McCarthy analogue.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.
J. Clarke
2018-12-09 00:00:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 8 Dec 2018 12:39:15 -0600, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
That was the second, A Life for the Stars. The first was about building the
Bridge on Jupiter, during a period when stricter and stricter thought control
was stifling US science and turning it into the equivalent of another Commie
country, complete with a Senator Proxmire expy.
s/Proxmire/McCarthy/
Although they were both U.S. senators from Wisconsin, that's about
the only thing that they had in common. "MacHinery" was definitely
a McCarthy analogue.
Perhaps so but I have unpleasant memories of Proxmier giving "golden
fleece" awards to any research program that he did not understand, one
of which led to a successful lawsuit against him.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-09 02:07:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 8 Dec 2018 12:39:15 -0600, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
By the "first" I mean the one with the kid shanghaied onto Scranton-aloft.
That was the second, A Life for the Stars. The first was about building the
Bridge on Jupiter, during a period when stricter and stricter thought control
was stifling US science and turning it into the equivalent of another Commie
country, complete with a Senator Proxmire expy.
s/Proxmire/McCarthy/
Although they were both U.S. senators from Wisconsin, that's about
the only thing that they had in common. "MacHinery" was definitely
a McCarthy analogue.
Perhaps so but I have unpleasant memories of Proxmier giving "golden
fleece" awards to any research program that he did not understand, one
of which led to a successful lawsuit against him.
Details please? Pretty, pretty please? I'd really like to know who to
thank for handing him his own ass.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Mike Van Pelt
2018-12-07 00:16:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, ...
Didn't the boy who was hero of one book and eventually became
City Manager and was executed off-screen by the time of another
book get executed because he bought a non-working
invisibility(?) machine from some aliens? (Which later
ironically turned out to work after all).
It was some trivial "The City 'Fathers' (totalitarian computer
overlords) got their diodes in a twist over _lese majeste_ and
murdered him, off stage, and we only hear about it much later"
thing is about all I remember.

I waited for the rest of the book for the City 'Fathers' to get
what was coming to them, a real James T. Kirkization, mit
blowensmoke und spitzensparken, but it, alas never happened.
--
Mike Van Pelt | "I don't advise it unless you're nuts."
mvp at calweb.com | -- Ray Wilkinson, after riding out Hurricane
KE6BVH | Ike on Surfside Beach in Galveston
Michael F. Stemper
2018-12-06 23:29:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship was
run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books. Maybe
they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
What about the mysterious "Web of Hercules"? I always had the impression
that they were humanity's successors.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.
Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-07 00:07:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
What about the mysterious "Web of Hercules"? I always had the
impression that they were humanity's successors.
Yeah, after some discussion, obviously I don't remember the books as
well as I thought I did.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Michael F. Stemper
2018-12-08 18:41:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship
was run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books.
Maybe they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
What about the mysterious "Web of Hercules"? I always had the
impression that they were humanity's successors.
Yeah, after some discussion, obviously I don't remember the books as
well as I thought I did.
Well, it's an easy thing to miss, since the aliens are never on
screen in any of the four novels.

And if your memory of them isn't up to snuff, there's a nice cure
for that. In fact, since I just remembered that the first[1] one
has the variant title of _Year 2018!_, this might be a good time
for me to do so, as well.

It'll partly make up for not rereading _Stand on Zanzibar_ in 2010.


[1] Internal chronology, not publication order
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.
David DeLaney
2018-12-06 23:40:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
And in Blish's Cities In Flight, the massive Vegan battleship was
run down by a planet traveling at faster than light speeds.
An asteroid, actually, piloted by Amalfi; NY,NY's engines had been distributed
around it, but it was irregularly-shaped enough to cause wobble, yaw, and dips
in the flight path.

The dirigible planet was He, and it took off out of the story once its flight
started; much faster than cities because it was much bigger, IIRC. Don't
remember whether it showed up again, but it wasn't anywhere near the March On
Earth false-flag operation.
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
But I don't recall any actual aliens in any of those books. Maybe
they were so terrified of humans they just stayed hidden.
There's some doubt about who exactly was spreading the Web of Hercules, but
yeah, "alien contact" was never the point of those books.

Dave, for that you'd need some of his others, the Quincunx series or the Black
Easter religious series. ... I think The Beep had alien messages in with the
rest, which just couldn't be understood?
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Scott Lurndal
2018-12-01 14:55:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
4)Breed like rabbits.
Juho Julkunen
2018-12-01 15:39:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
That one has traditionally been pinned on a specific ethnic group,
usually not to their credit.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
Internet search for "humanity fuck yeah", sometimes abbreviated as HFY,
will provide plenty of examples for those interested.
--
Juho Julkunen
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-01 18:19:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
That one has traditionally been pinned on a specific ethnic group,
usually not to their credit.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
Internet search for "humanity fuck yeah", sometimes abbreviated as HFY,
will provide plenty of examples for those interested.
You are no fun.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Cryptoengineer
2018-12-01 18:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be
fun to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of
humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY
biosphere! WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K
with the Human Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived
from General Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien
that his assertion that humanity would not fight the invasion because
no sane species would risk the damage to its homeworld's environment
contained a rather fatal assumption.
So this lists our first three reasons why aliens should be afraid of
humans: 1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere 3) We nailed our
own God to a tree
That one has traditionally been pinned on a specific ethnic group,
usually not to their credit.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should
be scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
Internet search for "humanity fuck yeah", sometimes abbreviated as
HFY, will provide plenty of examples for those interested.
One site is https://old.reddit.com/r/HFY/ which has hundreds of
fanfiction stories on this topic. Much is dreck, some is excellent.
Check the 'Classics' and 'Fetured Content' in the sidebar to improve
your Sturgeon Ratio.

pt
Robert Carnegie
2018-12-02 03:03:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
The Klingons killed their gods. I don't recall if gods are mentioned
in the Klingon afterlife, but evidently this is how they got there.

In Marvel Comics, our gods killed the Skrulls' gods. This was
shown as important as it happened during a religiously zealous
Skrull invasion of Earth. (You may have seen their propaganda.)

Vulcan gods, I don't remember about, except that _Spock's World_
claims that Vulcans perceive godhood telepathically... but apparently
the gods are omnipresent so it doesn't give you much information.

Returning to humans, I think Asimov noted the alien reaction to
detonation of nuclear weapons on our own homeworld unless it was
Arthur C. Clarke or Heinlein, pollution is very rarely claimed to
have eugenic benefits - although disposing of surplus infants
by exposure continues even in English-speaking countries -
or, given active anti-vaccine campaigns, by biological warfare.

Our instinct to attack and kill vulnerable-looking, non-aggressive
animals probably is because we're predators and they're meat.
The result of most surviving animals also being aggressive
probably isn't exclusively a response to humans or even exclusive
to Earth, although settings where different species get along
have been written, with varying plausibility.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-12-02 06:33:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be fun
to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K with the Human
Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived from General
Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien that his assertion
that humanity would not fight the invasion because no sane species would
risk the damage to its homeworld's environment contained a rather fatal
assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.

In short, we're biological Terminators. We don't stop. We keep coming,
no matter what you do, and in the end, we get you.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-02 06:44:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Based on a quote I've had for a while (below), I thought it might be
fun to list some of the badass reasons why aliens should be afraid of
humans.
"We have factories to pump pollutants into our atmosphere to weed out
those with weak lungs! We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY
biosphere! WE'RE the guys who NAILED our GOD to a TREE! Do not F**K
with the Human Race!" -- Robert Fenelon, playing a character derived
from General Nicolai from "Illegal Aliens", explaining to an alien
that his assertion that humanity would not fight the invasion because
no sane species would risk the damage to its homeworld's environment
contained a rather fatal assumption.
1) We weed out our weak by polluting our own atmosphere
2) We detonate atomic weapons in our only biosphere
3) We nailed our own God to a tree
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of
the most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you
run, you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have
been known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then
keep going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't
stop us.
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is
second to almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE
compared to us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can
die from the common cold.
In short, we're biological Terminators. We don't stop. We keep
coming, no matter what you do, and in the end, we get you.
I like it but I'm not sure if you are describing biological Terminators
or tool-using cockroaches. :D

(Maybe cockroach Terminators...?)
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Mike Van Pelt
2018-12-05 01:06:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience, naked, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.

How many higher life forms on this planet would not be
immediately killed outright by this treatment? Humans
do it on a dare.
--
Mike Van Pelt | "I don't advise it unless you're nuts."
mvp at calweb.com | -- Ray Wilkinson, after riding out Hurricane
KE6BVH | Ike on Surfside Beach in Galveston
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-12-05 02:54:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience, naked, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
How many higher life forms on this planet would not be
immediately killed outright by this treatment? Humans
do it on a dare.
I would be killed by the 200+ before I ever got outside.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-05 04:24:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience, naked, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*. (There is apparently
a universal posture, for men at least, with hands covering the most
sensitive bits. One hand over the mouth and nose to protect the
lungs, the other hand over . . . you know what.)
Post by Mike Van Pelt
How many higher life forms on this planet would not be
immediately killed outright by this treatment? Humans
do it on a dare.
The winter crew at the south pole station are a hardy bunch. (I saw
one account of a guy that did it four or five times in one night.
The first proved he could, the rest were for moral support for
those with less bravery.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Mike Van Pelt
2018-12-05 22:11:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience,
<<<naked>>
, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*.
No I didn't.
--
Mike Van Pelt | "I don't advise it unless you're nuts."
mvp at calweb.com | -- Ray Wilkinson, after riding out Hurricane
KE6BVH | Ike on Surfside Beach in Galveston
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-05 23:08:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience,
<<<naked>>
, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*.
No I didn't.
You clearly traveled back in time and edited your post to make me
look bad.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Robert Woodward
2018-12-06 05:35:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience,
<<<naked>>
, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*.
No I didn't.
You clearly traveled back in time and edited your post to make me
look bad.
He edited your reply as well.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Mike Van Pelt
2018-12-07 00:04:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience,
<<<naked>>
, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*.
No I didn't.
You clearly traveled back in time and edited your post to make me
look bad.
He edited your reply as well.
Dang, I should have gone back a few years and bought a bunch of
BitCoin when it was $1/each, and sold it all at $19,000 each.
Who knew the stupid time machine was going to catch fire and burn
up after just one use?
--
Mike Van Pelt | "I don't advise it unless you're nuts."
mvp at calweb.com | -- Ray Wilkinson, after riding out Hurricane
KE6BVH | Ike on Surfside Beach in Galveston
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-07 00:10:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
In this respect, I think of "The 300 Club" among antarctic
researchers. Experience,
<<<naked>>
, a 300 degree F temperature
swing. Dash out of a 200+ degree sauna into -100 degree
Antarctic winter, do a lap around the pole, and back into
the sauna.
You left out the part about doing it *naked*.
No I didn't.
You clearly traveled back in time and edited your post to make
me look bad.
He edited your reply as well.
Dang, I should have gone back a few years and bought a bunch of
BitCoin when it was $1/each, and sold it all at $19,000 each.
Who knew the stupid time machine was going to catch fire and
burn up after just one use?
Well, whoever built the _second_ time machine would have known
that.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Default User
2018-12-07 00:43:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Dang, I should have gone back a few years and bought a bunch of
BitCoin when it was $1/each, and sold it all at $19,000 each.
Who knew the stupid time machine was going to catch fire and
burn up after just one use?
Well, whoever built the second time machine would have known
that.
Who do you think set the first one on fire? Cut out the competition!



Brian
Titus G
2018-12-07 04:21:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Dang, I should have gone back a few years and bought a bunch of
BitCoin when it was $1/each, and sold it all at $19,000 each.
Who knew the stupid time machine was going to catch fire and burn
up after just one use?
I bought my machine off a guy I shared a joint and a bottle of wine with
in the park and I had already used it a few times to check whether my
sister had pinched me first or I had pulled her hair first and whether
it was my third or fourth wife who was squeezing the toothpaste tube at
the top. He used to sell electric cars, emigrated to Mars, built a few
time machines but came back to Dirt disillusioned after a trip into the
future where he discovered AGW completely discredited during the reign
of the McDenuire presidency. Now that I am getting older, I sometimes
forget what I did yesterday or this morning so a time machine has been
quite useful but if there is a possibility it will burst into flames I
will throw it in the recycle bin. Thanks for the warning.
Christian Weisgerber
2018-12-05 15:58:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.

This is about the only thing I remember from one of those wretched
_Ringworld_ sequels: Louis Wu long-distance races a young Kzin,
handily wins to the latter's surprise, and then explains that humans
are cursorial hunters while Kzinti are ambush predators.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness will
stand objectively once you adjust for size.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections. We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
Kevrob
2018-12-05 17:27:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.
Good thing we got a lot of wolves to join our "pack."

ObSF, the Tines in V Vinge's FIRE UPON THE DEEP, "domesticating"
a human child, for a reversed version, with an interesting twist.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
This is about the only thing I remember from one of those wretched
_Ringworld_ sequels: Louis Wu long-distance races a young Kzin,
handily wins to the latter's surprise, and then explains that humans
are cursorial hunters while Kzinti are ambush predators.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness will
stand objectively once you adjust for size.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections. We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
--
I have repeatedly explained, in other forums, that far more
people died from the "Columbian exchange" due to disease and
its after effects, such as depopulation leading to famine,
than wars between the European settlers and the N American
tribes. Most of the disease spread was unintentional. Some
of the colonizing bastards wanted the "Indians" alive, so they
could be turned into slaves. There was a lot of that, though.

https://news.brown.edu/articles/2017/02/enslavement

Kevin R
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-12-05 23:31:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.
Yes, they will. It turns out that (assuming equal fitness on both
parts) a human can walk even wolves into the ground. We're Just That
Good. Could *I* do it? No, I'm a 55-year old overweight asthmatic.

OTOH, I probably COULD walk most other animals into the ground. In my
current condition.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness will
stand objectively once you adjust for size.
It stands extremely well. The larger animals are even MORE likely to
die if you break bones, especially support bones. We are an outlier in
the way we survive shock and trauma.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections. We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
Only to an extent. Yes, there's plenty of things that can kill us, but
we recover from things that DON'T much faster. There is some truth to
the adage "What does not kill me makes me stronger".
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-05 23:38:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.
Yes, they will. It turns out that (assuming equal fitness on both
parts) a human can walk even wolves into the ground. We're Just That
Good. Could *I* do it? No, I'm a 55-year old overweight asthmatic.
OTOH, I probably COULD walk most other animals into the ground. In
my current condition.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness will
stand objectively once you adjust for size.
It stands extremely well. The larger animals are even MORE likely
to die if you break bones, especially support bones. We are an outlier
in the way we survive shock and trauma.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections. We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
Only to an extent. Yes, there's plenty of things that can kill us,
but we recover from things that DON'T much faster. There is some truth
to the adage "What does not kill me makes me stronger".
"The worst enemy to have is one who has survived many prior enemies."
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
David DeLaney
2018-12-06 23:33:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Only to an extent. Yes, there's plenty of things that can kill us,
but we recover from things that DON'T much faster. There is some truth
to the adage "What does not kill me makes me stronger".
"The worst enemy to have is one who has survived many prior enemies."
ObSF: a) Cohen the Barbarian and his band; b) "WHAT IS THE FIRST RULE?"

Dave, same source for both, of course
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-12-05 23:18:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
On 2018-12-02, Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we
are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after
you, you run, you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run
again, fall a little earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and
again until you can't run any farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.
Yes, they will. It turns out that (assuming equal fitness
on both
parts) a human can walk even wolves into the ground. We're Just
That Good. Could *I* do it? No, I'm a 55-year old overweight
asthmatic.
OTOH, I probably COULD walk most other animals into the
ground. In my
current condition.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals.
Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and
then keep going. Damage that would kill two or three other
creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness
will stand objectively once you adjust for size.
It stands extremely well. The larger animals are even MORE likely to
die if you break bones, especially support bones. We are an
outlier in the way we survive shock and trauma.
That's not because we're tough, that's because we're smart, and
have invented medical technology. Animals with broken bones are
often put down, sure, but that's a matter of economics, not medical
inability, far more often than not.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to
heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE
compared to us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but
they can die from the common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases
in our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New
World fared very poorly when confronted with new infections.
We essentially seem to have run out of new ones, at least for
the moment.
Only to an extent. Yes, there's plenty of things that can
kill us, but
we recover from things that DON'T much faster.
Again, that's not because we're tough, that's because we're smart
(and unlike a lot of social species, value the lives of
individusls). Our technology gives us reserves of resources far
beyond what mere animals can dream of, and that lets us take care
of the sick and injured.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
There is some
truth to the adage "What does not kill me makes me stronger".
And a good deal of utter bullshit.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
J. Clarke
2018-12-06 01:09:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:58:16 -0000 (UTC), Christian Weisgerber
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
1) Sure, we're not the strongest things around. But we are one of the
most terrifyingly ENDURING creatures around. We come after you, you run,
you get exhausted, we're still coming, you run again, fall a little
earlier, we're STILL COMING. Again and again until you can't run any
farther.
A wolf will not be impressed.
Depends on where the wolf is. In the arctic they can run a long time.
In the Serengeti not so much--they don't have a lot of cooling.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
This is about the only thing I remember from one of those wretched
_Ringworld_ sequels: Louis Wu long-distance races a young Kzin,
handily wins to the latter's surprise, and then explains that humans
are cursorial hunters while Kzinti are ambush predators.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2) We're unbelievably tough compared to most animals. Humans have been
known to break their bones and then SET THEM THEMSELVES, and then keep
going. Damage that would kill two or three other creatures doesn't stop us.
Humans are fairly big mammals. I don't think that toughness will
stand objectively once you adjust for size.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections. We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
Greg Goss
2018-12-07 06:11:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections.
Diamond had an explanation for why that was so in Guns, Germs and
Steel, but I forget why that was.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
Ebola is just one of several diseases hiding in the backwoods of
Africa. Where there's one, there could be several.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Kevrob
2018-12-07 13:00:36 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
3) Our overall resistance to disease, and ability to heal, is second to
almost nothing on Earth. Even other great apes are FRAGILE compared to
us. Yeah, a Gorilla can bench-press a Buick, but they can die from the
common cold.
That seems a matter of adaption to existing infectious diseases in
our environment. The indigenous inhabitants of the New World fared
very poorly when confronted with new infections.
Diamond had an explanation for why that was so in Guns, Germs and
Steel, but I forget why that was.
The Americas had few large domestic animals. The Old World did
and they were an original reservoir of infectious disease after
the advent of agriculture.

See: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK114494/
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Christian Weisgerber
We essentially
seem to have run out of new ones, at least for the moment.
Some new bugs "try" to crossover, but few make it.
Post by Greg Goss
Ebola is just one of several diseases hiding in the backwoods of
Africa. Where there's one, there could be several.
Remember "bird flue?"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avian_influenza

Kevin R
s***@yahoo.com
2018-12-07 06:58:10 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
During the cold war I read stuff, like, "overpressure" is used in estimating what gets destroyed by nukes, and humans were way tougher than buildings. I guess buildings falling on them was the problem.

Today websurfing where I oughtn't, I see some dumbass deathcultists bombed a nice passenger plane years ago, and studies of the corpses showed several drowned, meaning they survived the bomb, the structural disintegration, and falling many thousands of feet into the water.

Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds. Said airplane tragedy had a few suffocation victims, possible stuck in wreckage that rotated at high speed.
Quadibloc
2018-12-07 08:01:26 UTC
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.

John Savard
David Johnston
2018-12-07 18:55:38 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
Or maybe they didn't. I checked out a lot of those kind of things and
they turned out to be bullshit.
Post by Quadibloc
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.
John Savard
Case in point. That's a myth created by the conflation of one guy's
claim that that a train tunnel's steepness would lead to derailment and
another guy's concern that people might be suffocated by the smoke of
the train as it passed through the tunnel.
Quadibloc
2018-12-07 08:01:36 UTC
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.

John Savard
J. Clarke
2018-12-08 01:11:06 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
Post by Quadibloc
John Savard
David Johnston
2018-12-08 01:33:30 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
Mostly it shows that modern people like to talk crap about the past.
Alan Baker
2018-12-08 09:38:39 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could
skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at the impossible
speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer, I'd like to know exactly where
your friend claims that happened.

Not that it's impossible: it's just not very likely.
Robert Woodward
2018-12-08 18:03:26 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said
no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high
winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at
the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer, I'd like to know exactly where
your friend claims that happened.
Not that it's impossible: it's just not very likely.
Ahem, competitors in Downhill Ski races (you should remember that from
Winter Olympic coverage) reach speeds of over 80MPH regularly. Of
course, I am not certain when people starting to ski down very steep
slopes for fun.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-08 22:36:01 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Alan Baker
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said
no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high
winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at
the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer, I'd like to know exactly where
your friend claims that happened.
Not that it's impossible: it's just not very likely.
Ahem, competitors in Downhill Ski races (you should remember that from
Winter Olympic coverage) reach speeds of over 80MPH regularly. Of
course, I am not certain when people starting to ski down very steep
slopes for fun.
Or when they had the material science to build modern racing skis. Or
had the knowledge of aerodynamics to learn that using ski poles that
bend around the body reduces drag by some fraction of a percent as
opposed to straight poles. Etc.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Alan Baker
2018-12-08 23:00:02 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Alan Baker
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Quadibloc
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said
no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high
winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't go at
the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much. Friend of
mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer, I'd like to know exactly where
your friend claims that happened.
Not that it's impossible: it's just not very likely.
Ahem, competitors in Downhill Ski races (you should remember that from
Winter Olympic coverage) reach speeds of over 80MPH regularly. Of
course, I am not certain when people starting to ski down very steep
slopes for fun.
Was this friend of yours a world class downhiller?
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-08 19:59:13 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in
high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-12-08 22:57:43 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in
high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
Awwww...

Are you still upset that I've actually done these things, snowflake?
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-12-08 23:08:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath
in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
Awwww...
Are you still upset that I've actually done these things,
snowflake?
Are you still upset that nobody believes anything you lie about?
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Alan Baker
2018-12-08 23:14:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath
in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
Awwww...
Are you still upset that I've actually done these things,
snowflake?
Are you still upset that nobody believes anything you lie about?
I don't lie, Terry.

I don't have to.

I was a ski racer up until age 17. I was racing alongside people like
World Cup champion Steve Podborski. I stopped because I just wasn't
willing to dedicate the time it took to make it to the next level.

Sorry, but those are just facts.

I know that a person such as yourself cannot imagine someone actually
doing these things, but it doesn't change that I have done them.

I really was a ski racer.

I really am a ski instructor.

I really have sailed in a world championship.

I really do race Formula F.

I really am a certified race driving instructor.

:-)
Robert Carnegie
2018-12-08 23:30:17 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath
in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
Awwww...
Are you still upset that I've actually done these things,
snowflake?
Are you still upset that nobody believes anything you lie about?
I don't lie, Terry.
I don't have to.
I was a ski racer up until age 17. I was racing alongside people like
World Cup champion Steve Podborski. I stopped because I just wasn't
willing to dedicate the time it took to make it to the next level.
So when you stopped training, you went downhill very fast?

This may be a joke of both Mr Milton Jones and anybody
who skis.
Alan Baker
2018-12-08 23:34:47 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Alan Baker
On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 00:01:36 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 11:58:12 PM UTC-7,
Post by s***@yahoo.com
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks
said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath
in high winds.
I remember that as being the reason why locomotives couldn't
go at the impossible speed of sixty miles an hour.
Which shows the scientists of the day didn't get out much.
Friend of mine says that he's been clocked at 70 on skis.
As someone who actually was a ski racer,
Video games don't count.
Awwww...
Are you still upset that I've actually done these things,
snowflake?
Are you still upset that nobody believes anything you lie about?
I don't lie, Terry.
I don't have to.
I was a ski racer up until age 17. I was racing alongside people like
World Cup champion Steve Podborski. I stopped because I just wasn't
willing to dedicate the time it took to make it to the next level.
So when you stopped training, you went downhill very fast?
This may be a joke of both Mr Milton Jones and anybody
who skis.
Not bad... :-)
Dimensional Traveler
2018-12-07 16:05:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
Post by Dimensional Traveler
We detonate ATOMIC WEAPONS in our ONLY biosphere!
During the cold war I read stuff, like, "overpressure" is used in estimating what gets destroyed by nukes, and humans were way tougher than buildings. I guess buildings falling on them was the problem.
Today websurfing where I oughtn't, I see some dumbass deathcultists bombed a nice passenger plane years ago, and studies of the corpses showed several drowned, meaning they survived the bomb, the structural disintegration, and falling many thousands of feet into the water.
Odd fact; when flight was new, dumbass anti progress folks said no one could skydive like, 'cuz, you couldn't breath in high winds. Said airplane tragedy had a few suffocation victims, possible stuck in wreckage that rotated at high speed.
It is known that several members of the final Challenger crew survived
the breakup of the ship and were killed by the impact with the water at
terminal velocity.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Christian Weisgerber
2018-12-07 14:51:40 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
What other science fictional reasons can you name why aliens should be
scared of those hairless apes from Earth?
We think terrifying monsters are cute and cuddly and keep them as
pets.

Cats? Cute pets.
Ferrets? Cute pets.
Stone marten? Look, how cute!
Owl? Look, how cute!
Fox? Awww, isn't he cute.
Etc.

Now look at this from the perspective of a small rodent...
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
danny burstein
2018-12-07 15:51:40 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
We think terrifying monsters are cute and cuddly and keep them as
pets.
Cats? Cute pets.
Ferrets? Cute pets.
Stone marten? Look, how cute!
Owl? Look, how cute!
Fox? Awww, isn't he cute.
Etc.
Look at the cute Kzin...
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
J. Clarke
2018-12-08 01:12:05 UTC
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On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 15:51:40 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
Post by danny burstein
Post by Christian Weisgerber
We think terrifying monsters are cute and cuddly and keep them as
pets.
Cats? Cute pets.
Ferrets? Cute pets.
Stone marten? Look, how cute!
Owl? Look, how cute!
Fox? Awww, isn't he cute.
Etc.
Look at the cute Kzin...
Flashing on Speaker To Animals having his ears scratched at Louis Wu's
party.
Christian Weisgerber
2018-12-08 15:58:11 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
Post by Christian Weisgerber
We think terrifying monsters are cute and cuddly and keep them as
pets.
Look at the cute Kzin...
The bigger the cat, the bigger the cuddles!

*Insert video of Kevin Richardson and his lions*

--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
Quadibloc
2018-12-07 21:57:38 UTC
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We just did that YASID here not long ago.
Quadibloc
2018-12-08 10:56:50 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
We think terrifying monsters are cute and cuddly and keep them as
pets.
And the answer to that YASID was "The Easy Way Out" by Lee Correy.

John Savard
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