Discussion:
Mostly OT: Lucifer's Hammer redux
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pete...@gmail.com
2021-09-20 17:06:13 UTC
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You thought the bad stuff this decade was winding down?
Maybe not.

Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands, is a steep volcanic island. It's also unstable.

A big chunk of the western coast of the island may slide into the
ocean. If it does so all at once, it will generate a tsunami.

The worst case scenario has a 50 foot wave reaching the
east coast of the US 7-9 hours later:

https://www.cityofboston.gov/Images_Documents/La%20Palma%20Canary%20Island%20Generated%20Tsunami%20Study_tcm3-31980.pdf

Note that that's the WORST case. Later research suggests
its much more likely that the area will slide in a number of
smaller events, probably harmlessly (unless your house is
on top).

Why bring this up? Yesterday the same island, in the same
area, started experiencing a volcanic eruption. Lava has
already spilled down destroying homes.



IF there's suitable contact between seawater and the lava,
the steam explosion could start the landslide. And in a
Niven/Pournelle novel, Of Course It Would.

pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-09-20 19:42:50 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
You thought the bad stuff this decade was winding down?
Maybe not.
Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands, is a steep volcanic island. It's also unstable.
A big chunk of the western coast of the island may slide into the
ocean. If it does so all at once, it will generate a tsunami.
Hal, the volcanophile, has been following the Las Palmas news
closely, and says there's so far no sign it's going to do that.
The lava is following a known path to the sea. The few
inhabitants in the region are evacuating. The first to be
evacuated (a few days ago) were people with mobility problems.
Some livestock have also been evacuated.

The Spanish Prime Minister cancelled a UN visit to go to Las
Palmas, and the King has been keeping in touch.
Post by ***@gmail.com
The worst case scenario has a 50 foot wave reaching the
https://www.cityofboston.gov/Images_Documents/La%20Palma%20Canary%20Island%20Generated%20Tsunami%20Study_tcm3-31980.pdf
Note that that's the WORST case. Later research suggests
its much more likely that the area will slide in a number of
smaller events, probably harmlessly (unless your house is
on top).
Why bring this up? Yesterday the same island, in the same
area, started experiencing a volcanic eruption. Lava has
already spilled down destroying homes.
http://youtu.be/gbr_ox76OOE
IF there's suitable contact between seawater and the lava,
the steam explosion could start the landslide. And in a
Niven/Pournelle novel, Of Course It Would.
Well, let's hope not.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Scott Lurndal
2021-09-20 21:31:29 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
You thought the bad stuff this decade was winding down?
Maybe not.
Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands, is a steep volcanic island. It's also unstable.
A big chunk of the western coast of the island may slide into the
ocean. If it does so all at once, it will generate a tsunami.
That's been debunked.

https://en.as.com/en/2021/09/19/latest_news/1632069096_343081.html


"No, is the simple answer, based on most research. The answer
was the same in 2017 and seems necessary to confirm it once
again in 2021".
pete...@gmail.com
2021-09-21 02:36:06 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by ***@gmail.com
You thought the bad stuff this decade was winding down?
Maybe not.
Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands, is a steep volcanic island. It's also unstable.
A big chunk of the western coast of the island may slide into the
ocean. If it does so all at once, it will generate a tsunami.
That's been debunked.
I thought it was clear that that was an unlikely, worst case scenario.

Volcanic islands really are subject to spectacular, huge landslides.

Pt

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