Discussion:
"Dreamweaver's Dilemma" by Lois McMaster Bujold
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Lynn McGuire
2021-07-16 18:36:27 UTC
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"Dreamweaver's Dilemma" by Lois McMaster Bujold and Suford Lewis

https://www.amazon.com/Dreamweavers-Dilemma-Lois-McMaster-Bujold/dp/0915368536/

Kinda book number one of the the Vorkosigan space opera series. I read
the well printed and well bound trade paperback published by NESFA (New
England Science Fiction Association) in 1997. NESFA has published
almost all of the Vorkosigan space opera books in hardback for $25 each
and some trade paperback, $12 each.

The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.

NESFA books can be bought on Amazon or at their website:
https://www.nesfa.org/press/

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars (29 reviews)

Lynn
The Horny Goat
2021-09-17 02:36:38 UTC
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On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Lynn McGuire
2021-09-17 02:49:05 UTC
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Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-09-17 05:11:24 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2021-09-17 18:04:57 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
Pournelle said that Robert Heinlein gave him a long lecture on the
economics of writing science fiction when Heinlein gave him 20 pages of
single spaced notes on Pournelle's and Niven's "Lucifer's Hammer". That
book stayed in print until at least 2015 as airport bookstores ordered
it until at least then (I last saw it in the Houston Intercontinental
bookstore in 2015 or 2016). "Lucifer's Hammer" paid for all five of
Pournelle's kids to go to college and a California beach house. Plus a
swimming pool for his Studio City house.

https://swiftheadline.com/studio-city-home-of-late-sci-fi-author-jerry-pournelle-seeks-1-8-million-daily-news/

Lynn
William Hyde
2021-09-17 20:54:44 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
Pournelle said that Robert Heinlein gave him a long lecture on the
economics of writing science fiction when Heinlein gave him 20 pages of
single spaced notes on Pournelle's and Niven's "Lucifer's Hammer". That
book stayed in print until at least 2015 as airport bookstores ordered
it until at least then (I last saw it in the Houston Intercontinental
bookstore in 2015 or 2016).
After "mote" and "Inferno" I and all the other SF readers I knew at the time were going to buy every N/P collaboration we saw, sight unseen.


"Lucifer's Hammer" paid for all five of
Post by Lynn McGuire
Pournelle's kids to go to college and a California beach house. Plus a
swimming pool for his Studio City house.
At the time the rumors were that they got a staggering (by SF standards) advance. Which was vastly more than covered by sales, of course. I assume "footfall" was also lucrative.

William Hyde
Lynn McGuire
2021-09-17 21:43:39 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
Pournelle said that Robert Heinlein gave him a long lecture on the
economics of writing science fiction when Heinlein gave him 20 pages of
single spaced notes on Pournelle's and Niven's "Lucifer's Hammer". That
book stayed in print until at least 2015 as airport bookstores ordered
it until at least then (I last saw it in the Houston Intercontinental
bookstore in 2015 or 2016).
After "mote" and "Inferno" I and all the other SF readers I knew at the time were going to buy every N/P collaboration we saw, sight unseen.
"Lucifer's Hammer" paid for all five of
Post by Lynn McGuire
Pournelle's kids to go to college and a California beach house. Plus a
swimming pool for his Studio City house.
At the time the rumors were that they got a staggering (by SF standards) advance. Which was vastly more than covered by sales, of course. I assume "footfall" was also lucrative.
William Hyde
I cannot remember exactly what Pournelle said but "Lucifer's Hammer"
outsold the rest of their books by at least 10X. Maybe 100X. The sales
in the airport bookstores were several hundred thousand ??? copies a
year at peak. Apparently a lot of people used to buy mmpb's in the
airport bookstores, read them on the plane, and then throw them away in
the airport or hotel.

"Niven and Pournelle originally pitched the story to publishers as an
alien invasion story in which the aliens drop a comet onto Earth after
humanity fights them. Jim Baen told them to write only the comet story.
The original story idea was later written as their novel Footfall. "
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucifer%27s_Hammer

Lynn
Robert Woodward
2021-09-18 04:55:30 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
Pournelle said that Robert Heinlein gave him a long lecture on the
economics of writing science fiction when Heinlein gave him 20 pages of
single spaced notes on Pournelle's and Niven's "Lucifer's Hammer". That
book stayed in print until at least 2015 as airport bookstores ordered
it until at least then (I last saw it in the Houston Intercontinental
bookstore in 2015 or 2016). "Lucifer's Hammer" paid for all five of
Pournelle's kids to go to college and a California beach house. Plus a
swimming pool for his Studio City house.
https://swiftheadline.com/studio-city-home-of-late-sci-fi-author-jerry-pournel
le-seeks-1-8-million-daily-news/
Those bookcases look like the ones I have (furniture store went out of
business and no other furniture store I have visited has any like them).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
William Hyde
2021-09-17 20:48:26 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Probably. Remember what Heinlein said (I am sure that LMB is a fan),
sell every story three times: magazines first, hard cover, then a MMPB.
If only!
When Dickens or Collins wrote a novel the next step was to make a play of it. The plays often brought in more money than the novel.

One of Dickens' complaints about the US was that someone else would quickly knock off a play of his most recent novel, so that there was no market for Dickens' own version. He also feared that these shoddy plays would dampen interest in his next novel, but that doesn't seem to have happened.

William Hyde
Robert Woodward
2021-09-17 05:07:04 UTC
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Post by The Horny Goat
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:36:27 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
The book starts off with a very good Sherlock Homes story, some very
different short stories, a story about a pre-wormhole spaceship pilot
for the Beta colony (14 years subjective from Earth, 100+ years actual)
for a ramscoop spaceship, and third book that I have read containing the
most excellent "Mountains of Mourning" novella. And several essays
about writing science fiction.
Didn't I read that first in Analog?
Yes, it was in the May 1989 issue. BTW, "Labyrinth" and "Weatherman"
(first chapters of _The Vor Game_ also appeared in Analog (Aug 1989 and
Feb 1990 respectively).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
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