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OT, AKICIF: Current electric cars...
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Peter Trei
2019-06-03 14:32:29 UTC
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My daughter managed to total her car last week.

We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.

So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).

This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.

Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?

pt
Scott Lurndal
2019-06-03 15:10:32 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
Looking at the parking lot at work, Tesla outnumbers both the
Volt and the Bolt combined. You might want to take a look at a used
Tesla (Model S or 3).
Lynn McGuire
2019-06-03 21:16:23 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
pt
One of my cousins bought a Tesla Model 3 last September. He now has 11K
miles on it and loves it. He got the dual motors (4WD) and the 310 mile
battery. He plugs it in for free at his employers parking garage and
loves that too. He had a trim piece come loose the other day and Tesla
sent a mechanic to his work place to fix the trim piece.

The car is incredibly fast (zero to 60 mph in three seconds, verified by
Consumer Reports). He paid about $69K for the car before any rebates
and subsidies here in The Great State of Texas. But with free "fuel",
his costs are dropping rapidly. The Tesla replaced his 2007 ??? Mustang
GT and he plans to drive it to at least 150K miles.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2019-06-04 00:26:54 UTC
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Permalink
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 16:16:23 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
pt
One of my cousins bought a Tesla Model 3 last September. He now has 11K
miles on it and loves it. He got the dual motors (4WD) and the 310 mile
battery. He plugs it in for free at his employers parking garage and
loves that too. He had a trim piece come loose the other day and Tesla
sent a mechanic to his work place to fix the trim piece.
The car is incredibly fast (zero to 60 mph in three seconds, verified by
Consumer Reports). He paid about $69K for the car before any rebates
and subsidies here in The Great State of Texas. But with free "fuel",
his costs are dropping rapidly. The Tesla replaced his 2007 ??? Mustang
GT and he plans to drive it to at least 150K miles.
Lots of Teslas in the lot at work. Also lots of Volts. There's one
Bolt. I talked to the owner for a bit and she seems to like it very
much. Says it has enough range to get her from Springfield to Boston
and back without any concern about running out of juice. But be aware
that the Bolt is an econobox, not a hotrod. It seems to be a good
example of the econobox breed but it's not going to show taillights to
a 427 Cobra like a Tesla can.
Peter Trei
2019-06-04 02:43:31 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 16:16:23 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
pt
One of my cousins bought a Tesla Model 3 last September. He now has 11K
miles on it and loves it. He got the dual motors (4WD) and the 310 mile
battery. He plugs it in for free at his employers parking garage and
loves that too. He had a trim piece come loose the other day and Tesla
sent a mechanic to his work place to fix the trim piece.
The car is incredibly fast (zero to 60 mph in three seconds, verified by
Consumer Reports). He paid about $69K for the car before any rebates
and subsidies here in The Great State of Texas. But with free "fuel",
his costs are dropping rapidly. The Tesla replaced his 2007 ??? Mustang
GT and he plans to drive it to at least 150K miles.
Lots of Teslas in the lot at work. Also lots of Volts. There's one
Bolt. I talked to the owner for a bit and she seems to like it very
much. Says it has enough range to get her from Springfield to Boston
and back without any concern about running out of juice. But be aware
that the Bolt is an econobox, not a hotrod. It seems to be a good
example of the econobox breed but it's not going to show taillights to
a 427 Cobra like a Tesla can.
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).

I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues. My Altima, in 12 years and 253,000 miles,
never left me stuck on the side of the road (modulo a few flat tires, and it
had a full-service spare). Not even once.

The Bolt seems better value for money, but yes, its an econobox, less luxurious
than the Altima, and not as cool as the Tesla. I may try test-driving one this
weekend.

pt
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2019-06-04 08:47:07 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 19:43:31 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
Is the Hyundai Kona EV available in your region? It's just inside your
parameters.
https://arstechnica.com/cars/2019/05/heres-how-i-accidentally-inspired-an-electric-car-record-attempt/

Cheers - Jaimie
--
The Daily Mail should be forced to print the words 'The Paper That
Supported Hitler' on its masthead, just so that there is something
that's true on the front page every day. -- Mark Thomas
Robert Carnegie
2019-06-04 09:01:55 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 16:16:23 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
pt
One of my cousins bought a Tesla Model 3 last September. He now has 11K
miles on it and loves it. He got the dual motors (4WD) and the 310 mile
battery. He plugs it in for free at his employers parking garage and
loves that too. He had a trim piece come loose the other day and Tesla
sent a mechanic to his work place to fix the trim piece.
The car is incredibly fast (zero to 60 mph in three seconds, verified by
Consumer Reports). He paid about $69K for the car before any rebates
and subsidies here in The Great State of Texas. But with free "fuel",
his costs are dropping rapidly. The Tesla replaced his 2007 ??? Mustang
GT and he plans to drive it to at least 150K miles.
Lots of Teslas in the lot at work. Also lots of Volts. There's one
Bolt. I talked to the owner for a bit and she seems to like it very
much. Says it has enough range to get her from Springfield to Boston
and back without any concern about running out of juice. But be aware
that the Bolt is an econobox, not a hotrod. It seems to be a good
example of the econobox breed but it's not going to show taillights to
a 427 Cobra like a Tesla can.
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues. My Altima, in 12 years and 253,000 miles,
never left me stuck on the side of the road (modulo a few flat tires, and it
had a full-service spare). Not even once.
I don't have information on this subject, but "never breaks
down" is a standard of reliability that may be too much
to expect. On the other hand, that record may qualify you
as "one careful owner".
Post by Peter Trei
The Bolt seems better value for money, but yes, its an econobox, less luxurious
than the Altima, and not as cool as the Tesla. I may try test-driving one this
weekend.
pt
Peter Trei
2019-06-04 15:25:45 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 16:16:23 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Peter Trei
My daughter managed to total her car last week.
We're looking at giving her my current car. Its a
2007 Nissan Altima with 253,000 miles, but has been
very reliable. I'm not very happy to give it up.
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
Does anyone has experience with the Chevy Bolt?
pt
One of my cousins bought a Tesla Model 3 last September. He now has 11K
miles on it and loves it. He got the dual motors (4WD) and the 310 mile
battery. He plugs it in for free at his employers parking garage and
loves that too. He had a trim piece come loose the other day and Tesla
sent a mechanic to his work place to fix the trim piece.
The car is incredibly fast (zero to 60 mph in three seconds, verified by
Consumer Reports). He paid about $69K for the car before any rebates
and subsidies here in The Great State of Texas. But with free "fuel",
his costs are dropping rapidly. The Tesla replaced his 2007 ??? Mustang
GT and he plans to drive it to at least 150K miles.
Lots of Teslas in the lot at work. Also lots of Volts. There's one
Bolt. I talked to the owner for a bit and she seems to like it very
much. Says it has enough range to get her from Springfield to Boston
and back without any concern about running out of juice. But be aware
that the Bolt is an econobox, not a hotrod. It seems to be a good
example of the econobox breed but it's not going to show taillights to
a 427 Cobra like a Tesla can.
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues. My Altima, in 12 years and 253,000 miles,
never left me stuck on the side of the road (modulo a few flat tires, and it
had a full-service spare). Not even once.
I don't have information on this subject, but "never breaks
down" is a standard of reliability that may be too much
to expect. On the other hand, that record may qualify you
as "one careful owner".
Post by Peter Trei
The Bolt seems better value for money, but yes, its an econobox, less luxurious
than the Altima, and not as cool as the Tesla. I may try test-driving one this
weekend.
I'll be test-driving a Tesla 3 this weekend.

As for my Altima having 'one careful owner', the only thing I've
been particularly careful about was to put it on full synthetic oil
from day one, and change it every 5000 miles. I mostly use an independent
mechanic who is 5 minutes walk from my house.

I've had issues with brakes (I'm crap at getting the pads changed), wheel
bearings, and the exhaust system corroding, but the only thing that has stopped
me on the road in 253k miles has been flat tires (and yes, it has a full
service spare).

If Nissan had something better in an eV than the Leaf, I'd consider it
seriously.

pt
Dan Tilque
2019-06-06 20:11:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
Post by Peter Trei
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues.
Consumer Reports bases their recommendations on surveys going back a
year or more. So that may not reflect the currently selling cars.
--
Dan Tilque
Alan Baker
2019-06-06 20:20:32 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
You know... ...there is this new thing called the "Internet"...

...and companies put all kinds of information on it...

...and you can look up this information...

...and learn things like the fact the shortest range Tesla you can buy
today has a range of nearly 240 miles.

And at under $40K, it's really not that badly priced for a car that does
0-60 in 5.3s

:-)
Peter Trei
2019-06-06 20:22:34 UTC
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Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
Unless you're an eV owner, at this point I've probably researched this more
than you. The bottom end Tesla M3 is well over 200 miles, but loses 30% of
its range in freezing weather, 50% in sub-zero (F).

One other drawback is that it loses several miles a day just sitting there.
A month in long-term parking at the airport may leave you with no juice.
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues.
Consumer Reports bases their recommendations on surveys going back a
year or more. So that may not reflect the currently selling cars.
That does seem to be the consensus.

pt
Lynn McGuire
2019-06-06 20:37:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
Unless you're an eV owner, at this point I've probably researched this more
than you. The bottom end Tesla M3 is well over 200 miles, but loses 30% of
its range in freezing weather, 50% in sub-zero (F).
One other drawback is that it loses several miles a day just sitting there.
A month in long-term parking at the airport may leave you with no juice.
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues.
Consumer Reports bases their recommendations on surveys going back a
year or more. So that may not reflect the currently selling cars.
That does seem to be the consensus.
pt
Does the Tesla still lose charge when the battery charge goes below 50%
? Above 50% charge, the Tesla turns on the air conditioning to cool the
battery when needful. Below 50% charge, the battery does not get that hot.

I would pay the extra and get the 310 mile (130 ??? kwhr) battery. My
cousin loves his.

Lynn
Dan Tilque
2019-06-06 21:51:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dan Tilque
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
Unless you're an eV owner, at this point I've probably researched this more
than you. The bottom end Tesla M3 is well over 200 miles,
OK, sorry, I was going by memory which said the range was more like 175
miles.

At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
--
Dan Tilque
Lynn McGuire
2019-06-06 21:58:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dan Tilque
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
Unless you're an eV owner, at this point I've probably researched this more
than you. The bottom end Tesla M3 is well over 200 miles,
OK, sorry, I was going by memory which said the range was more like 175
miles.
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this. The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car. I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.

Lynn
Dan Tilque
2019-06-07 04:32:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this.  The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car.  I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.
OK, I'll take your word for it.

I don't own an EV, but closely follow the news about them online. Pretty
much all the news sites are way over-enthusiastic about them, especially
about that company. So figured I should discount a certain amount of
that news for that reason. But it's hard to judge which news to discount
and which not to.
--
Dan Tilque
J. Clarke
2019-06-07 10:35:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Dan Tilque
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this.  The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car.  I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.
OK, I'll take your word for it.
I don't own an EV, but closely follow the news about them online. Pretty
much all the news sites are way over-enthusiastic about them, especially
about that company. So figured I should discount a certain amount of
that news for that reason. But it's hard to judge which news to discount
and which not to.
FWiW, my employer just installed additional chargers due to the
existing ones being all in use most days. This is in Springfield MA,
midway between New York and Boston, where we get New England winters.
Mine loses about half its range in the winter, but it's also a Ford,
the Tesla people tell me that theirs don't lose nearly that much.
Alan Baker
2019-06-07 16:04:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Dan Tilque
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this.  The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car.  I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.
OK, I'll take your word for it.
I don't own an EV, but closely follow the news about them online. Pretty
much all the news sites are way over-enthusiastic about them, especially
about that company. So figured I should discount a certain amount of
that news for that reason. But it's hard to judge which news to discount
and which not to.
FWiW, my employer just installed additional chargers due to the
existing ones being all in use most days. This is in Springfield MA,
midway between New York and Boston, where we get New England winters.
Mine loses about half its range in the winter, but it's also a Ford,
the Tesla people tell me that theirs don't lose nearly that much.
Those must be in a locked parking garage with armed guards, right?

:-)
Lynn McGuire
2019-06-07 17:58:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Dan Tilque
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this.  The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car.  I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.
OK, I'll take your word for it.
I don't own an EV, but closely follow the news about them online. Pretty
much all the news sites are way over-enthusiastic about them, especially
about that company. So figured I should discount a certain amount of
that news for that reason. But it's hard to judge which news to discount
and which not to.
FWiW, my employer just installed additional chargers due to the
existing ones being all in use most days. This is in Springfield MA,
midway between New York and Boston, where we get New England winters.
Mine loses about half its range in the winter, but it's also a Ford,
the Tesla people tell me that theirs don't lose nearly that much.
My cousin can only park his Tesla 3 at the charger for two hours at his
office building now. People starting buying plugin electric cars
because the chargers are at the front of the parking lot.

Lynn
Alan Baker
2019-06-07 18:21:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Dan Tilque
At any rate, I'd treat the range numbers they claim much like EPA
mileage numbers for ICE cars: you probably won't get that in the real world.
I have personal experience with this.  The 310 mile rated battery in the
Tesla Model 3 will go 310 miles (in warm weather) without hypermiling
the car.  I was amazed and we had four large guys in the car most of the
time.
OK, I'll take your word for it.
I don't own an EV, but closely follow the news about them online. Pretty
much all the news sites are way over-enthusiastic about them, especially
about that company. So figured I should discount a certain amount of
that news for that reason. But it's hard to judge which news to discount
and which not to.
FWiW, my employer just installed additional chargers due to the
existing ones being all in use most days.  This is in Springfield MA,
midway between New York and Boston, where we get New England winters.
Mine loses about half its range in the winter, but it's also a Ford,
the Tesla people tell me that theirs don't lose nearly that much.
My cousin can only park his Tesla 3 at the charger for two hours at his
office building now.  People starting buying plugin electric cars
because the chargers are at the front of the parking lot.
Are they in a bunker with armed guards to protect them?

:-)

J. Clarke
2019-06-06 21:03:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I'm eliminating anything with a range under 200 miles, so the number of
suitable eVs is limited. I'm kind of taken with the Tesla 3, but I'm
unlikely to look at the high end models. My price point isn't really set yet,
and subsidies and rebates make a lot of difference to the final price. (The
Federal rebate is running out fast).
The lower-priced Teslae have a much shorter range than the higher-priced
ones do. I'm pretty sure they're less than your 200-mile limit.
The shortest ranged Model 3, which is the cheapest model Tesla sells,
has an EPA range of 220 miles.
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by Peter Trei
I do worry that my like for the Tesla is based on reporte from fanboys in
rose-tinted glasses. I'm skeptical that the company can get everything right
with so little experience, and note that Consumer Reports no longer reccomends
the 3 due to reliability issues.
Consumer Reports bases their recommendations on surveys going back a
year or more. So that may not reflect the currently selling cars.
Consumer Reports also has an annoying habit of not making much
distinction between "the lighter stopped working" and "the engine fell
out". They show the Model 3 as having the highest of their 5 levels
of reliability in all reliability areas but "paint/trim", "body
hardware", and "in-car electronics" where it is 4, 3, and 4
respectively, 3 being "average".
-dsr-
2019-06-04 00:03:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
IIRC, you're in the greater Boston area. There's a Tesla dealership
in Watertown; I go by it all the time.

Several of the Nissan dealers have Leaf(s).

-dsr-
Garrett Wollman
2019-06-04 01:36:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by -dsr-
Post by Peter Trei
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
IIRC, you're in the greater Boston area. There's a Tesla dealership
in Watertown; I go by it all the time.
Several of the Nissan dealers have Leaf(s).
Honda also has an entry in this space, the Clarity EV, but its range
seems to be behind the market leaders by a good deal. ("Clarity" was
originally just the name for their [only leased within twenty miles of
the only three fueling stations in Southern California] hydrogen
fuel-cell model, but a year or two ago they decided to make it into
their EV and PHEV platform as well.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Peter Trei
2019-06-04 02:47:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by -dsr-
Post by Peter Trei
So, I'm looking at a replacement. Does anyone in the group
have experience with current eVs? I'd like a Tesla 3, but
adding what I consider necessary options may push it
above my price pain point (~40k after rebates and subsidies).
This would be a commuter car - assume no more than 100 miles/day,
but I'd want at least 200 miles range. I'll retain a different, ICE
car for long trips.
IIRC, you're in the greater Boston area. There's a Tesla dealership
in Watertown; I go by it all the time.
Tesla doesn't have dealerships in the normal sense - they have showrooms,
but you still need to buy online. The one at the Natick Mall is more
convenient for me.
Post by -dsr-
Several of the Nissan dealers have Leaf(s).
Insufficient range.

pt
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