Discussion:
New Normal by Aihara Akito
(too old to reply)
David Johnston
2021-02-18 06:24:34 UTC
Permalink
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...

It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
pete...@gmail.com
2021-02-18 14:51:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
I seem to recall a SS back in the 70s, in which a traveller visits a decayed,
decadent USA, and among other things, masking has become the norm, but
not for health reasons (think masquerade ball type masks). Bare faces have
become eroticized.

pt
Robert Woodward
2021-02-18 19:02:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
I seem to recall a SS back in the 70s, in which a traveller visits a decayed,
decadent USA, and among other things, masking has become the norm, but
not for health reasons (think masquerade ball type masks). Bare faces have
become eroticized.
This sounds like a Fritz Leiber story, I believe ... checking ...
"Coming Attraction", published in Galaxy in the November 1950 issue (it
was one of the stories in _The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume
One_, i.e., a retro-Nebula).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-18 19:35:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
I seem to recall a SS back in the 70s, in which a traveller visits a decayed,
decadent USA, and among other things, masking has become the norm, but
not for health reasons (think masquerade ball type masks). Bare faces have
become eroticized.
This sounds like a Fritz Leiber story, I believe ... checking ...
"Coming Attraction", published in Galaxy in the November 1950 issue (it
was one of the stories in _The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume
One_, i.e., a retro-Nebula).
There's always _Hero's Walk_, early 1950s, in which unmarried
women, at least, wear dominoes (that is, masks that cover the
region of the eyes). I'll paraphrase* a bit of conversation:

"I wish you'd take off that damned domino."

"But the eyes are the window of the soul, didn't you know? And in
these days, no unmarried woman wants to have her soul stared at."

"[Speaker's wife] doesn't."

"She's a married woman with three children. She doesn't need
to."

_____
*Because my copy is in the "brown room" (from the color of
its curtains), and as previously mentioned, I don't the cats to
get in because it will be hard to get them out again.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-02-19 04:37:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
I seem to recall a SS back in the 70s, in which a traveller visits a decayed,
decadent USA, and among other things, masking has become the norm, but
not for health reasons (think masquerade ball type masks). Bare faces have
become eroticized.
This sounds like a Fritz Leiber story, I believe ... checking ...
"Coming Attraction", published in Galaxy in the November 1950 issue (it
was one of the stories in _The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume
One_, i.e., a retro-Nebula).
Or Vance's "The Moon Moth", perhaps? Though that was another planet
that was decayed or anyway Vancian baroque.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
James Nicoll
2021-02-18 15:20:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
Are there just two chapters of it so far?
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
David Johnston
2021-02-18 21:37:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
Are there just two chapters of it so far?
In Japan as of this week they have four chapters.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-18 15:35:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
In a Japan allegedly in the future remarkably little has changed except
for one thing. Some incredibly frightening pandemic has inculcated such
a fear of contagion that a nation-wide taboo against letting anyone see
you without a mask. And thus "accidental glimpse of a girl's lips"
replaces "accidental kiss" as the launchpad for a romantic comedy...
It's kind of neat, really. They have some interesting taboos about food
preparation too.
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Steve Coltrin
2021-02-18 17:05:08 UTC
Permalink
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"

- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-02-18 17:16:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
"Bifurcated Girls":

https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/bifurcated-girls-vanity-fair-special-issue-1903/
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-18 17:56:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/bifurcated-girls-vanity-fair-special-issue-1903/
"These 'risque' pictures of women in trousers are a strange
precursor to a time when women would don trousers, not for men's
titillation (as it seems here), but as a practical necessity when
many took over 'men's jobs' during WW1 and WW2, and later simply
because they wanted to."

Except for rugged individualists such as Katharine Hepburn, who
wore pants a lot (except when a movie role required her to wear a
dress). There's the tale of Hepburn wearing pants to the studio
in the 1930s, and an enraged director telling her to "take those
pants off!" So she did, and walked on toward the set in her
underpants. Whereupon she was allowed to put the pants back on.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2021-02-18 19:57:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/bifurcated-girls-vanity-fair-special-issue-1903/
"These 'risque' pictures of women in trousers are a strange
precursor to a time when women would don trousers, not for men's
titillation (as it seems here), but as a practical necessity when
many took over 'men's jobs' during WW1 and WW2, and later simply
because they wanted to."
Except for rugged individualists such as Katharine Hepburn, who
wore pants a lot (except when a movie role required her to wear a
dress). There's the tale of Hepburn wearing pants to the studio
in the 1930s, and an enraged director telling her to "take those
pants off!" So she did, and walked on toward the set in her
underpants. Whereupon she was allowed to put the pants back on.
It certainly fits with her image.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-18 17:47:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
James Nicoll
2021-02-18 18:07:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
The Riverworld is populated by the resurrected dead, so probably a
literal caveman.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-18 19:38:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
The Riverworld is populated by the resurrected dead, so probably a
literal caveman.
Yes, I'm sure I read at least the first book in that series. But
my objection stands: a genuine caveman would have had much more
occasion to see the cavewoman's skin than the genuine Victorian
who would turn to watch three inches of ankle revealed by a woman
stepping onto a streetcar.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2021-02-18 20:37:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
The Riverworld is populated by the resurrected dead, so probably a
literal caveman.
Yes, I'm sure I read at least the first book in that series. But
my objection stands: a genuine caveman would have had much more
occasion to see the cavewoman's skin than the genuine Victorian
who would turn to watch three inches of ankle revealed by a woman
stepping onto a streetcar.
So it would be understandable that he would be confused or scornful of
those getting "ekthited" by ankles.
--
I like living in the suburbs of Sanity. I can commute there when I need
to be serious or mature but otherwise I can do as I please.
Steve Coltrin
2021-02-18 20:05:55 UTC
Permalink
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
A literal caveman and possibly a Neandertal or similar.

At this point he's lived among people from throughout human history for
a few years.
--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
J. Clarke
2021-02-18 20:09:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
The premise of Riverworld is that all humans who have ever lived are
resurrected along the banks of a vast river. So literal caveman. It's
been a long time since I read them but I recall there was at least one
significant character who was a member of a previously unknown human
species with a nose like that of a proboscis monkey.

Note--Mark Twain lived before I was born and mostly during the time of
Queen Victoria but I don't think that he was described in the
Riverworld books, in which he is a prominent character, as a
"caveman".
Michael F. Stemper
2021-02-19 00:19:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
The premise of Riverworld is that all humans who have ever lived are
resurrected along the banks of a vast river. So literal caveman. It's
been a long time since I read them but I recall there was at least one
significant character who was a member of a previously unknown human
species with a nose like that of a proboscis monkey.
I believe that was actually the character to whom Steve was referring.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.
David Johnston
2021-02-18 21:39:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
No, it's a caveman talking to...Mark Twain probably.
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-19 00:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
But in caves it would be dark... however, this
seems to be the "caveman" mocking "Victorian"
propriety. The alleged /American/ modesty that
supposedly abhorred naked legs of tables and
chairs. I'm assured that it almost never really
got that bad. Maybe if you had a crazy knitter in
the family, you'd get table leg covers as your
Christmas present.
Kevrob
2021-02-19 05:27:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I assume you're using "caveman" to mean "somebody who lived
before I was born and was probably a Victorian"? Because
cavewomen probably covered themselves in furs when it was cold
and went naked or nearly naked when it was warm.
But in caves it would be dark... however, this
seems to be the "caveman" mocking "Victorian"
propriety. The alleged /American/ modesty that
supposedly abhorred naked legs of tables and
chairs. I'm assured that it almost never really
got that bad. Maybe if you had a crazy knitter in
the family, you'd get table leg covers as your
Christmas present.
It reminded me of Cole Porter.

[mpfc] "Fish, bananas, old pyjamas..."[/mpfc]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anything_Goes_(Cole_Porter_song)
--
Kevin R
Michael F. Stemper
2021-02-18 18:32:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
"In your time vomen vore clotheth which covered them from the neck to
the ankleth, and you got ekthited if you thaw a goodlooking ankle, and a
thigh, oh my!"
- the caveman character from the Riverworld books whose name I was too
lazy to google
I believe that the one who said that was "Joe Louis", however a quick
scan of one book didn't reveal it. It did show a second cave man
(Neanderthal) whose name was "Kazz". I'm guessing that the first one's
name was bestowed by Sam Clemens.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Deuteronomy 10:18-19
Default User
2021-02-18 23:24:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public. Even very
thin gloves are considered risque. Note that this applies to everyone,
because they don't have any public gender differentiation.


Brian
Juho Julkunen
2021-02-19 16:56:52 UTC
Permalink
In article <s0mt09$mt2$***@dont-email.me>, ***@yahoo.com
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
--
Juho Julkunen
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-19 17:14:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.

I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
David Johnston
2021-02-19 18:42:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
In "New Normal" the male lead thinks his face is unimpressive because he
has no basis for comparison. When he actually takes off his mask, the
artist draws him super-pretty.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-19 18:53:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
In "New Normal" the male lead thinks his face is unimpressive because he
has no basis for comparison. When he actually takes off his mask, the
artist draws him super-pretty.
That'll be news to him.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-19 21:04:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
I haven't searched exhaustively but maybe nobody dared
record the alternative lyrics of 1928 song "That's My
Weakness Now", which my late father seemed to have
learned while conscripted in the Second World War.

"My girl's got sweaty feet
I never cared for sweaty feet
But my girl's got sweaty feet
And that's my weakness now"

And no doubt for his children's benefit he was censoring
the piece (and I don't remember him singing it to Mum),
but the various versions of "real" lyrics end up as quite
erotic - for 1928.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-19 22:26:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
I haven't searched exhaustively but maybe nobody dared
record the alternative lyrics of 1928 song "That's My
Weakness Now", which my late father seemed to have
learned while conscripted in the Second World War.
"My girl's got sweaty feet
I never cared for sweaty feet
But my girl's got sweaty feet
And that's my weakness now"
I've heard the tame, SFW version of that song, so it must've
lingered into the late forties. (I was born shortly after Pearl
Harbor.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And no doubt for his children's benefit he was censoring
the piece (and I don't remember him singing it to Mum),
but the various versions of "real" lyrics end up as quite
erotic - for 1928.
Awww.

My father was a cadet instructor for the US Air Corps, and he got
to know some visiting RAF officers. One of whom taught him "I've
Got Sixpence," which he proceeded to teach to me. Now, it's
possible that the flyboys taught my father an NSFW version, but
if so, it never got to me. My father was born in Connecticut in
1912, and was something of a prude. _Vide supra_, he got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2021-02-20 06:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they'rbeautiful.
I haven't searched exhaustively but maybe nobody dared
record the alternative lyrics of 1928 song "That's My
Weakness Now", which my late father seemed to have
learned while conscripted in the Second World War.
"My girl's got sweaty feet
I never cared for sweaty feet
But my girl's got sweaty feet
And that's my weakness now"
I've heard the tame, SFW version of that song, so it must've
lingered into the late forties. (I was born shortly after Pearl
Harbor.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And no doubt for his children's benefit he was censoring
the piece (and I don't remember him singing it to Mum),
but the various versions of "real" lyrics end up as quite
erotic - for 1928.
Awww.
My father was a cadet instructor for the US Air Corps, and he got
to know some visiting RAF officers. One of whom taught him "I've
Got Sixpence," which he proceeded to teach to me. Now, it's
possible that the flyboys taught my father an NSFW version, but
if so, it never got to me. My father was born in Connecticut in
1912, and was something of a prude. _Vide supra_, he got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
--
My Dad, born in the 19-teens, would chide us for doing so.
He was afraid we'd get hookworm. Barefoot was for the beach.
He was livid when my older brother, about to enter his senior year
of high school, seriously injured his leg playing pick-up touch football
at the park near the beach one August. How wearing shoes would
have helped my bro, I don't know. He tried to run through a small patch
of high grass, the type you'd find Tom Sawyer or Huck Finn chewing on.
Unfortunately, the grass camouflaged a large rock or paving stone.
It cracked his shin, and he had to sit out most of the football season.

As for the "...Sixpence" song, there are older versions dating to the
early 19th century, according to the always helpful Mudcat Cafe. One
is "The Jolly Shilling," and counts down from twelve pence.

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279

I probably learned the tune from Lawrence Welk, whose show my folks
never missed, or from Mitch Miller.



https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279
--
Kevin R
J. Clarke
2021-02-20 12:39:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they'rbeautiful.
I haven't searched exhaustively but maybe nobody dared
record the alternative lyrics of 1928 song "That's My
Weakness Now", which my late father seemed to have
learned while conscripted in the Second World War.
"My girl's got sweaty feet
I never cared for sweaty feet
But my girl's got sweaty feet
And that's my weakness now"
I've heard the tame, SFW version of that song, so it must've
lingered into the late forties. (I was born shortly after Pearl
Harbor.)
Post by Robert Carnegie
And no doubt for his children's benefit he was censoring
the piece (and I don't remember him singing it to Mum),
but the various versions of "real" lyrics end up as quite
erotic - for 1928.
Awww.
My father was a cadet instructor for the US Air Corps, and he got
to know some visiting RAF officers. One of whom taught him "I've
Got Sixpence," which he proceeded to teach to me. Now, it's
possible that the flyboys taught my father an NSFW version, but
if so, it never got to me. My father was born in Connecticut in
1912, and was something of a prude. _Vide supra_, he got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
--
My Dad, born in the 19-teens, would chide us for doing so.
He was afraid we'd get hookworm. Barefoot was for the beach.
He was livid when my older brother, about to enter his senior year
of high school, seriously injured his leg playing pick-up touch football
at the park near the beach one August. How wearing shoes would
have helped my bro, I don't know. He tried to run through a small patch
of high grass, the type you'd find Tom Sawyer or Huck Finn chewing on.
Unfortunately, the grass camouflaged a large rock or paving stone.
It cracked his shin, and he had to sit out most of the football season.
Parents are weird. They have a deplorable tendency to major in the
minors.
Post by Kevrob
As for the "...Sixpence" song, there are older versions dating to the
early 19th century, according to the always helpful Mudcat Cafe. One
is "The Jolly Shilling," and counts down from twelve pence.
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279
I probably learned the tune from Lawrence Welk, whose show my folks
never missed, or from Mitch Miller.
http://youtu.be/LmDo0p1TESg
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-20 15:23:21 UTC
Permalink
In article <fade15e4-fa95-4c61-ae49-***@googlegroups.com>,
Kevrob <***@my-deja.com> wrote:

[much upthread snipped]
Post by Kevrob
My Dad, born in the 19-teens, would chide us for doing so.
He was afraid we'd get hookworm. Barefoot was for the beach.
He was livid when my older brother, about to enter his senior year
of high school, seriously injured his leg playing pick-up touch football
at the park near the beach one August. How wearing shoes would
have helped my bro, I don't know. He tried to run through a small patch
of high grass, the type you'd find Tom Sawyer or Huck Finn chewing on.
Unfortunately, the grass camouflaged a large rock or paving stone.
It cracked his shin, and he had to sit out most of the football season.
Was this a disappointment for him, or for his father? If the
latter, let me go find a tiny violin.
Post by Kevrob
As for the "...Sixpence" song, there are older versions dating to the
early 19th century, according to the always helpful Mudcat Cafe. One
is "The Jolly Shilling," and counts down from twelve pence.
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279
I probably learned the tune from Lawrence Welk, whose show my folks
never missed....
Dear me, I was taken to dance to the band of Lawrence Welk once,
in Long Beach if I'm not mistaken. Early sixties. I remember
being astonished he was still alive.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2021-02-21 05:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[much upthread snipped]
Post by Kevrob
My Dad, born in the 19-teens, would chide us for doing so.
He was afraid we'd get hookworm. Barefoot was for the beach.
He was livid when my older brother, about to enter his senior year
of high school, seriously injured his leg playing pick-up touch football
at the park near the beach one August. How wearing shoes would
have helped my bro, I don't know. He tried to run through a small patch
of high grass, the type you'd find Tom Sawyer or Huck Finn chewing on.
Unfortunately, the grass camouflaged a large rock or paving stone.
It cracked his shin, and he had to sit out most of the football season.
Was this a disappointment for him, or for his father? If the
latter, let me go find a tiny violin.
It was a disappointment for my brother, of course. My father was not
very happy, because:

1) One of his children was hurt.
2) He probably had to pay a health insurance deductible.
3) At the time, my brother was a middling-too-poor student,
and the threat that he might get bounced from a sports team
was an impetus to actually make the minimum grase point required.
4) Is more complicated. Since my brother's academic record was
....spotty.... compared to his higher achieving siblings, there was
a real question of whether any tertiary school but the local community
college would take him! Big bro healed up, and my coach-Dad* found
a junior college in the Southwest where he could play football and -
oh, yeah - take classes. He wasn't a first-stringer, but played QB
on the "scout team" against the defense in practices. He was also
a placekicker, so hurting the leg was less than optimum.

BroRob made it through JuCo, enrolled at a branch of Long
Island University, and earned a BA and a teaching credential.
He followed in Dad's footsteps, teaching and coaching. He
eventually got serious.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
As for the "...Sixpence" song, there are older versions dating to the
early 19th century, according to the always helpful Mudcat Cafe. One
is "The Jolly Shilling," and counts down from twelve pence.
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279
I probably learned the tune from Lawrence Welk, whose show my folks
never missed....
Dear me, I was taken to dance to the band of Lawrence Welk once,
in Long Beach if I'm not mistaken. Early sixties. I remember
being astonished he was still alive.
--
Now, that's some serious pop-culture avoid-fu! Welk's show was on
national TV weekly until 1982, and while not on the cutting edge of
the music scene, even those who didn't watch would recognize a
parody. I learned all sorts of "square" music from the Welk show.

* My Dad did not coach his sons, as we didn't go to his district's
schools. Oh, he taught us stuff in the back yard, but we were
never put through what I understand can be an ordeal for some
"coaches' kids."
--
Kevin R
Joy Beeson
2021-02-22 18:19:52 UTC
Permalink
My father . . . got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
I was born just before Pearl Harbor. In my neck of the woods, adults
were expected to be shod, but it was taken for granted that children
would go barefoot unless the occasion was formal or their feet needed
protection.

It was probably a climate thing. When we started spending winters in
Florida, Mom firmly informed the two remaining children that if bare
skin touched Florida soil, we would get hookworm.

Hookworm was a dire affliction at the time.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-22 19:02:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joy Beeson
My father . . . got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
I was born just before Pearl Harbor. In my neck of the woods, adults
were expected to be shod, but it was taken for granted that children
would go barefoot unless the occasion was formal or their feet needed
protection.
It was probably a climate thing. When we started spending winters in
Florida, Mom firmly informed the two remaining children that if bare
skin touched Florida soil, we would get hookworm.
Hookworm was a dire affliction at the time.
So I'm told. A quick google informed me it was brought into
California in the early 20th century by human carriers. Still,
nobody ever mentioned it around me. My father's annoyance was, I
think, motivated more by prudery than by fear of infection.

Then there's heartworm, which apparently has gotten into
California more recently, because of irrigation in the deserts
that used to keep it out.

ObSF: Anvil's "The Gentle Earth," in which cold-blooded aliens
invade Earth, and those landing in Florida and environs turn out
to be susceptible to heartworm.

(Also to hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other
phenomena which the aliens tend to dismiss as "myths" because
they never saw any of those back home.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-02-22 19:20:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joy Beeson
My father . . . got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
I was born just before Pearl Harbor. In my neck of the woods, adults
were expected to be shod, but it was taken for granted that children
would go barefoot unless the occasion was formal or their feet needed
protection.
It was probably a climate thing. When we started spending winters in
Florida, Mom firmly informed the two remaining children that if bare
skin touched Florida soil, we would get hookworm.
Hookworm was a dire affliction at the time.
So I'm told. A quick google informed me it was brought into
California in the early 20th century by human carriers. Still,
nobody ever mentioned it around me. My father's annoyance was, I
think, motivated more by prudery than by fear of infection.
Then there's heartworm, which apparently has gotten into
California more recently, because of irrigation in the deserts
that used to keep it out.
ObSF: Anvil's "The Gentle Earth," in which cold-blooded aliens
invade Earth, and those landing in Florida and environs turn out
to be susceptible to heartworm.
(Also to hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other
phenomena which the aliens tend to dismiss as "myths" because
they never saw any of those back home.)
I thought the foot thing was "ringworm", not "hookworm".
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
J. Clarke
2021-02-22 21:31:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joy Beeson
My father . . . got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
I was born just before Pearl Harbor. In my neck of the woods, adults
were expected to be shod, but it was taken for granted that children
would go barefoot unless the occasion was formal or their feet needed
protection.
It was probably a climate thing. When we started spending winters in
Florida, Mom firmly informed the two remaining children that if bare
skin touched Florida soil, we would get hookworm.
Hookworm was a dire affliction at the time.
So I'm told. A quick google informed me it was brought into
California in the early 20th century by human carriers. Still,
nobody ever mentioned it around me. My father's annoyance was, I
think, motivated more by prudery than by fear of infection.
Then there's heartworm, which apparently has gotten into
California more recently, because of irrigation in the deserts
that used to keep it out.
ObSF: Anvil's "The Gentle Earth," in which cold-blooded aliens
invade Earth, and those landing in Florida and environs turn out
to be susceptible to heartworm.
(Also to hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other
phenomena which the aliens tend to dismiss as "myths" because
they never saw any of those back home.)
I thought the foot thing was "ringworm", not "hookworm".
No, ringworm is a fungus, makes a circular pattern, hence the "ring".
I had it on my arm when I was a kid.

Hookworm is a real worm.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-22 22:23:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
ObSF: Anvil's "The Gentle Earth," in which cold-blooded aliens
invade Earth, and those landing in Florida and environs turn out
to be susceptible to heartworm.
(Also to hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other
phenomena which the aliens tend to dismiss as "myths" because
they never saw any of those back home.)
I thought the foot thing was "ringworm", not "hookworm".
No, ringworm is a fungus, makes a circular pattern, hence the "ring".
I had it on my arm when I was a kid.
I did too, although I don't remember it. Just as I don't
remember having been stung by a scorpion when we were in Texas
during the war, but my mother told me about it.
Post by J. Clarke
Hookworm is a real worm.
https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/hookworm/index.html
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-22 22:20:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joy Beeson
My father . . . got annoyed
if I went barefoot.
I was born just before Pearl Harbor. In my neck of the woods, adults
were expected to be shod, but it was taken for granted that children
would go barefoot unless the occasion was formal or their feet needed
protection.
It was probably a climate thing. When we started spending winters in
Florida, Mom firmly informed the two remaining children that if bare
skin touched Florida soil, we would get hookworm.
Hookworm was a dire affliction at the time.
So I'm told. A quick google informed me it was brought into
California in the early 20th century by human carriers. Still,
nobody ever mentioned it around me. My father's annoyance was, I
think, motivated more by prudery than by fear of infection.
Then there's heartworm, which apparently has gotten into
California more recently, because of irrigation in the deserts
that used to keep it out.
ObSF: Anvil's "The Gentle Earth," in which cold-blooded aliens
invade Earth, and those landing in Florida and environs turn out
to be susceptible to heartworm.
(Also to hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other
phenomena which the aliens tend to dismiss as "myths" because
they never saw any of those back home.)
I thought the foot thing was "ringworm", not "hookworm".
Pretty sure it was hookworm. I'll see if I still have the old
_Astounding_ still sitting around, and get back to you. It's
possible the aliens didn't know the Terran name and invented one?
Note also that ringworm isn't a worm, it's a fungus.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2021-02-20 18:29:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
I recall seeing a film where a woman enters a room in which a man,
fully clothed but with his jacket off, is sitting. He gets up,
apologizes, and puts the jacket on.

He wasn't "decent" without the jacket.

It worked both ways, at least in some cultures.

Well, given that the films got it right, of course.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-20 19:18:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
I think that was the point I was trying to make: any part that is
usually covered becomes an erogenous zone when one actually gets
a glimpse of it.
I'm now trying to remember the title of a rather silly movie, set
in the US in the Victorian era (both time and place being
relevant) in which a young woman of marriageable age is for some
reason going about her house barefoot. And her boyfriend shows
up, and she immediately retreats behind the sofa so he can't see
her feet. He proposes marriage (which I *think* was his
intention anyway), and when she accepts, he shyly asks if he may
see her feet. And when she steps out from behind the sofa, he
says her feet are beautifyl. Mind, she's been wearing tight
boots all her life, because women's feet are suppose to be small
and dainty. Her toes are bent and cramped and distorted. But
because he's never seen a grown woman's feet before, he thinks
they're beautiful.
I recall seeing a film where a woman enters a room in which a man,
fully clothed but with his jacket off, is sitting. He gets up,
apologizes, and puts the jacket on.
He wasn't "decent" without the jacket.
It worked both ways, at least in some cultures.
Well, given that the films got it right, of course.
Always debatable, yes.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
John Halpenny
2021-02-20 02:36:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly

"May I see your nose?"

"Not until we are married!!"

John
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2021-02-20 10:39:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
I love children, especially when they cry, for then someone takes them
away.
-- Nancy Mitford
Robert Carnegie
2021-02-20 14:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
But what if the noses and lips are applied to the
genitals and butts?

Not that anyone's going to see, though...

I'm sceptical that men get excited by a lady's ankle
except in jokes. Their minds are on higher things.

I could be wrong, and tastes vary, but I don't think
that hiding arbitrary body parts makes them sexy
when revealed. Now hands... you can do things
with hands. You can do things /to/ hands.
But elbows... you tell me.

<https://sites.google.com/site/qitranscripts/transcripts/7x10>
obsessively preserves a discussion on BBC TV
panel show _QI_ about proportionate loss of body
heat from your head... the point being "yes /if/ you
don't cover it and you cover everything else".
David Mitchell, the comedian one, says, "If people
went around with bare buttocks a lot, they would say,
'In the cold you should really put on a buttock hat,
you lose all your heat through your buttocks'."

So that's another reason.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-20 15:29:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the
moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper
Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
But what if the noses and lips are applied to the
genitals and butts?
Not that anyone's going to see, though...
I'm sceptical that men get excited by a lady's ankle
except in jokes. Their minds are on higher things.
You think???
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2021-02-20 15:53:16 UTC
Permalink
On 20 Feb 2021 at 15:29:56 GMT, "Dorothy J Heydt" <Dorothy J Heydt>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the
moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper
Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
But what if the noses and lips are applied to the
genitals and butts?
Not that anyone's going to see, though...
I'm sceptical that men get excited by a lady's ankle
except in jokes. Their minds are on higher things.
You think???
About 2'6" higher, and 4' higher (in stereo).

Cheers - Jaimie
--
I always wanted to be someone. I should have been more specific.
-- Lily Tomlin
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-20 15:28:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Halpenny
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the
moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper
Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
Not a good idea. If there's COVID anywhere in your system, it
could be transmitted sexually.

Remember Heinlein's line? "A venereal disease [which is what
STIs were called back then] is one whose infective agent is so
fragile that it can be transmitted only by the most intimate of
contact."

I remember an illustration ... I think it might have come from
some mildly naughty men's magaine in the nineteenth century. It
showed a Victorian-era lady dressed for a ball, wearing a long
gown with a very very low neckline; and a dancer from some
Islamic country whose face was carefully hidden, but her torso
and abdomen bare.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2021-02-20 15:56:21 UTC
Permalink
On 20 Feb 2021 at 15:28:47 GMT, "Dorothy J Heydt" <Dorothy J Heydt>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by John Halpenny
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the
moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper
Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
Not a good idea. If there's COVID anywhere in your system, it
could be transmitted sexually.
This was widely touted in the papers at the time, but it was poor advice
from a charity trying to be helpful.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-53736087

I was mildly surprised it didn't become government policy, given that
our gov has been only slightly better than your previous administration
about these things.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Please stop telling us what you feel. Please stop telling us
what your intuition is. Your intuitive feelings are of no
interest whatsoever, and nor are mine. I don't give a bugger
what you feel, or what I feel. I want to know what the evidence shows."
-- Richard Dawkins
J. Clarke
2021-02-20 21:08:23 UTC
Permalink
On 20 Feb 2021 15:56:21 GMT, Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On 20 Feb 2021 at 15:28:47 GMT, "Dorothy J Heydt" <Dorothy J Heydt>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by John Halpenny
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the
moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper
Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
John
Early on in the pandemic there was advice to avoid having sex face to
face. So clearly, genitals and butts will lose their requirements to be
hidden while noses and lips will become The Forbidden And Exciting.
Not a good idea. If there's COVID anywhere in your system, it
could be transmitted sexually.
This was widely touted in the papers at the time, but it was poor advice
from a charity trying to be helpful.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-53736087
It looks to me like they were describing what the government allowed
under the lockdown rules.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
I was mildly surprised it didn't become government policy, given that
our gov has been only slightly better than your previous administration
about these things.
Cheers - Jaimie
Bice
2021-02-23 17:40:53 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 19 Feb 2021 18:36:53 -0800 (PST), John Halpenny
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the moment. A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper Covid masks. The fellow asks shyly
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
When Saturday Night Live first came back from their Covid shutdown and
were featuring mostly pre-recorded skits, they had a rap video called
"Bottom of Your Face" about guys trying to figure out what the girls
they're dating actually look like behind their mask:



Not exactly a classic, but mildly humorous. The bit about not knowing
what her face looks like but knowing her dog's name made me laugh.

-- Bob
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-02-23 18:49:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bice
On Fri, 19 Feb 2021 18:36:53 -0800 (PST), John Halpenny
Post by John Halpenny
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic among
the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
The present day equivalent was in a cartoon I can't find at the moment.
A young couple are seated on a park bench, wearing their proper Covid
masks. The fellow asks shyly
Post by John Halpenny
"May I see your nose?"
"Not until we are married!!"
When Saturday Night Live first came back from their Covid shutdown and
were featuring mostly pre-recorded skits, they had a rap video called
"Bottom of Your Face" about guys trying to figure out what the girls
http://youtu.be/Y1eAv5dvImM
So I tried looking at that, but I couldn't understand what the
man was saying. I get the point, though.
Post by Bice
Not exactly a classic, but mildly humorous. The bit about not knowing
what her face looks like but knowing her dog's name made me laugh.
Once upon a time in the West Kingdom, Sir Michael St. Severe fought
wearing the favor of Wander Riordan in the Coronet Lists of the Mists.
They didn't know each other that well, but they were both nice
people, and a fighter for Crown or Coronet has to have a
prospective consort.

Sir Michael won, and crowned Wander with the traditional wreath
of ivy, and they exchanged phone numbers and went home. And as
Wander told us later, "We're going to reign together for six
months, and I just learned his mundane name. I would trust this
man with my life! but I don't know what he likes on his pizza."

It was a very good reign.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Default User
2021-02-20 07:05:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
says...
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Erogenous zones (as regions of women's bodies, as observed by
heterosexual men) are anything that's usually covered. Around
the turn of the twentieth century, it was an ankle. In
traditional Japan, it was the back of the neck. And so on.
In Ann Leckie's Ancillary triology, bare hands are highly erotic
among the Raadchai. As a result, everyone wears gloves in public.
Are you sure bare hands being considered erotic isn't the result of
everybody always wearing gloves?
That's probably more correct view of it.


Brian
David Johnston
2021-02-27 18:41:03 UTC
Permalink
They're up to 4 installments now and we've learned according to their
estimates 80% of the world's population died in the pandemic. Of course
it seems that the city has walled itself off from that world and is
terrified that carriers might get in so the estimate may not be
authoritative. How the city is keeping itself fed is something of a
mystery.

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