Discussion:
Triffid Oil
(too old to reply)
p***@hotmail.com
2018-09-03 05:58:34 UTC
Permalink
In John Wyndham's 1951 novel _The Day of the Triffids_, the triffids are
mobile plants about ten feet high at maturity that can move themselves
about on their roots and have a poisonous sting on a tentacle-like
organ that they can shoot out like a chameleon's tongue. They are
farmed for their oil. The plant's origin is somewhat obscure, but
to the best knowledge of the narrator/protagonist they were developed
in the Soviet Union. They first came to the attention of the west
when a Soviet entrepreneur approached the Artic & European Fish
Oil Company with samples of a new vegetable oil. The company people
found it to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils and were eager to assist the entrepreneur in bringing
it to market. Apparently, his attempt to fly out a plane-load
of the plants failed when his aircraft was shot down, but this
resulted in the wind-borne seeds being dispersed all over the
world. When the triffids started springing up the value of their
oil was recognized and, despite the obvious dangers, they became
the basis of a major industry.

From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this. Are there parts of the
world where fish oil is their traditional cooking oil? Are there
connoisseurs of fish oil? I admit to being surprised the first
time I saw a shop that sold primarily high-end olive oil
and vinegar.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-03 06:06:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In John Wyndham's 1951 novel _The Day of the Triffids_, the triffids are
mobile plants about ten feet high at maturity that can move themselves
about on their roots and have a poisonous sting on a tentacle-like
organ that they can shoot out like a chameleon's tongue. They are
farmed for their oil. The plant's origin is somewhat obscure, but
to the best knowledge of the narrator/protagonist they were developed
in the Soviet Union. They first came to the attention of the west
when a Soviet entrepreneur approached the Artic & European Fish
Oil Company with samples of a new vegetable oil. The company people
found it to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils and were eager to assist the entrepreneur in bringing
it to market. Apparently, his attempt to fly out a plane-load
of the plants failed when his aircraft was shot down, but this
resulted in the wind-borne seeds being dispersed all over the
world. When the triffids started springing up the value of their
oil was recognized and, despite the obvious dangers, they became
the basis of a major industry.
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this. Are there parts of the
world where fish oil is their traditional cooking oil? Are there
connoisseurs of fish oil? I admit to being surprised the first
time I saw a shop that sold primarily high-end olive oil
and vinegar.
Well, in the 60s, my mother was convinced that Cod-liver oil was good
for whatever ailed a kid. I was myself much less sure...
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 14:26:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In John Wyndham's 1951 novel _The Day of the Triffids_, the triffids are
mobile plants about ten feet high at maturity that can move themselves
about on their roots and have a poisonous sting on a tentacle-like
organ that they can shoot out like a chameleon's tongue. They are
farmed for their oil. The plant's origin is somewhat obscure, but
to the best knowledge of the narrator/protagonist they were developed
in the Soviet Union. They first came to the attention of the west
when a Soviet entrepreneur approached the Artic & European Fish
Oil Company with samples of a new vegetable oil. The company people
found it to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils and were eager to assist the entrepreneur in bringing
it to market. Apparently, his attempt to fly out a plane-load
of the plants failed when his aircraft was shot down, but this
resulted in the wind-borne seeds being dispersed all over the
world. When the triffids started springing up the value of their
oil was recognized and, despite the obvious dangers, they became
the basis of a major industry.
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this. Are there parts of the
world where fish oil is their traditional cooking oil? Are there
connoisseurs of fish oil? I admit to being surprised the first
time I saw a shop that sold primarily high-end olive oil
and vinegar.
Well, in the 60s, my mother was convinced that Cod-liver oil was good
for whatever ailed a kid. I was myself much less sure...
I take capsules of fish oil as a supplement; but the oil is
*encapsulated*; I don't have to taste it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Default User
2018-09-03 19:30:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by p***@hotmail.com
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued
largely as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids,
essential to human nutrition and particularly critical in fetal
and infant brain development. Was this recognized back in 1951?
Well, in the 60s, my mother was convinced that Cod-liver oil was
good for whatever ailed a kid. I was myself much less sure...
I take capsules of fish oil as a supplement; but the oil is
encapsulated; I don't have to taste it.
I have not been motivated to bite into one.


Brian
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-03 21:19:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by p***@hotmail.com
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued
largely as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids,
essential to human nutrition and particularly critical in fetal
and infant brain development. Was this recognized back in 1951?
Well, in the 60s, my mother was convinced that Cod-liver oil was
good for whatever ailed a kid. I was myself much less sure...
I take capsules of fish oil as a supplement; but the oil is
encapsulated; I don't have to taste it.
I have not been motivated to bite into one.
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Joy Beeson
2018-09-11 22:12:13 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:19:58 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
Fish oil is for thinning the blood. I have to lay off for two weeks
before each epidural, and one week before getting a skin cancer off.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/.

---
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Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-11 22:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:19:58 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
Fish oil is for thinning the blood. I have to lay off for two weeks
before each epidural, and one week before getting a skin cancer off.
The FDA tested prescriptions from my doctor are taking care of that
nicely, so I don't feel the need to use untested "supplements" for that. ;)
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Greg Goss
2018-09-16 07:39:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:19:58 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
Fish oil is for thinning the blood. I have to lay off for two weeks
before each epidural, and one week before getting a skin cancer off.
The FDA tested prescriptions from my doctor are taking care of that
nicely, so I don't feel the need to use untested "supplements" for that. ;)
Omega oils also have supposed neurological effects. I take mine as an
anti-depression placebo.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Kevrob
2018-09-16 16:06:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:19:58 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
Fish oil is for thinning the blood. I have to lay off for two weeks
before each epidural, and one week before getting a skin cancer off.
The FDA tested prescriptions from my doctor are taking care of that
nicely, so I don't feel the need to use untested "supplements" for that. ;)
Omega oils also have supposed neurological effects. I take mine as an
anti-depression placebo.
I just try to eat fish regularly. I bought a pound of salmon
yesterday. I may grill it tonight.

Kevin R
Joy Beeson
2018-09-17 02:45:08 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 11 Sep 2018 18:12:13 -0400, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:19:58 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Thereby demonstrating that you have enough brain capacity to not need them.
Fish oil is for thinning the blood. I have to lay off for two weeks
before each epidural, and one week before getting a skin cancer off.
Oops! While checking my calendar, I realized that it's one week for
both procedures.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

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https://www.avg.com
f***@gmail.com
2018-09-07 09:01:57 UTC
Permalink
Greetings all
Post by Default User
I have not been motivated to bite into one.
Brian
Having accidentally done exactly that (bit into one) I can recommend (in fact insist) that you remain in your unmotivated state. If you are lucky the contents merely taste disgusting.

If you are unlucky the contents are rancid (inferior materials, poor quality controls, or outright criminal behavior by the manufacturers or retailers).

When I did take fish oil I knew when I had gotten the rancid batch (Even without biting into it) because the capsule's contents disagreed with my stomach in the most unfavorable ways.

Hence I am no longer taking the stuff.

Just don't do it.

Regards
Frank
Joy Beeson
2018-09-11 02:46:29 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 19:30:45 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
I have not been motivated to bite into one.
Yesterday I got distracted half-way through taking a fish-oil capsule
and it started to leak before I swallowed.

YUCK
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net

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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Gene Wirchenko
2018-09-03 22:35:02 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 14:26:50 GMT, ***@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt)
wrote:

[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Well, in the 60s, my mother was convinced that Cod-liver oil was good
for whatever ailed a kid. I was myself much less sure...
I take capsules of fish oil as a supplement; but the oil is
*encapsulated*; I don't have to taste it.
I went through some of that as a kid. After a while, I came to
like the taste somewhat.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Greg Goss
2018-09-03 19:41:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
The company people
found [triffid oil] to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils ...
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this.
As of the late sixties, my parents were tryiing (and largely failing)
to get doses of cod liver oil down our throats. I'm not sure what the
treatment was for, but the amounts were in the "supplement" scale.

From Wikipediia "In the 1800s cod liver oil became popular as a
medicine and both pale and brown oils were used."'

The article mentions vitamins A and D, as well as the omegas. Indeed
enough A to be dangerous for overdosing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-03 19:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by p***@hotmail.com
The company people
found [triffid oil] to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils ...
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this.
As of the late sixties, my parents were tryiing (and largely failing)
to get doses of cod liver oil down our throats. I'm not sure what the
treatment was for, but the amounts were in the "supplement" scale.
From Wikipediia "In the 1800s cod liver oil became popular as a
medicine and both pale and brown oils were used."'
The article mentions vitamins A and D, as well as the omegas. Indeed
enough A to be dangerous for overdosing.
--
I fail to see how anyone could overdose on cod liver oil!
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2018-09-03 20:58:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by p***@hotmail.com
The company people
found [triffid oil] to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils ...
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this.
As of the late sixties, my parents were tryiing (and largely failing)
to get doses of cod liver oil down our throats. I'm not sure what the
treatment was for, but the amounts were in the "supplement" scale.
From Wikipediia "In the 1800s cod liver oil became popular as a
medicine and both pale and brown oils were used."'
The article mentions vitamins A and D, as well as the omegas. Indeed
enough A to be dangerous for overdosing.
--
I fail to see how anyone could overdose on cod liver oil!
--
It can have unpleasant effects, if not unhealthy ones.

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1040/cod-liver-oil#

Being made to take it was one of those things the kids
in the Our Gang/Little Rascals shorts plotted to avoid.
My parents, who grew up during the Depression, explained
its nastiness to my siblings and me.

Castor oil was also a dreaded fate for Spanky and the Gang.

The vitamin D in CLO fought rickets, and if there was not yet
access to foods fortified with Vitamin D, it might have been
an efficient way to make up a lack.

Kevin R
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-03 21:21:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by p***@hotmail.com
The company people
found [triffid oil] to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils ...
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this.
As of the late sixties, my parents were tryiing (and largely failing)
to get doses of cod liver oil down our throats. I'm not sure what the
treatment was for, but the amounts were in the "supplement" scale.
From Wikipediia "In the 1800s cod liver oil became popular as a
medicine and both pale and brown oils were used."'
The article mentions vitamins A and D, as well as the omegas. Indeed
enough A to be dangerous for overdosing.
I fail to see how anyone could overdose on cod liver oil!
I seem to remember something about Eskimo children love fish oil.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
p***@hotmail.com
2018-09-04 18:27:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by p***@hotmail.com
The company people
found [triffid oil] to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils ...
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this.
As of the late sixties, my parents were tryiing (and largely failing)
to get doses of cod liver oil down our throats. I'm not sure what the
treatment was for, but the amounts were in the "supplement" scale.
From Wikipediia "In the 1800s cod liver oil became popular as a
medicine and both pale and brown oils were used."'
The article mentions vitamins A and D, as well as the omegas. Indeed
enough A to be dangerous for overdosing.
--
I fail to see how anyone could overdose on cod liver oil!
--
I am sure you are correct, at least as far as voluntarily overdosing.
Regarding the danger of vitamin A poisoning, I found this on
Wikipedia in their article about the 1912 Australasian Antarctic Expedition,
led by Douglas Mawson:

Mawson himself was part of a three-man sledging team, the Far Eastern Party,
with Xavier Mertz, and Lieutenant B. E. S. Ninnis who headed east on 10
November 1912 to survey King George V Land. On 14 December 1912,after
three weeks of excellent progress, the party was crossing the Ninnis Glacier,
when Ninnis fell through a snow-covered crevasse. Mertz had skied over the
crevasse lid, Mawson had been on his sled with his weight dispersed, but Ninnis
was jogging beside the second sled and his body weight is likely to have
breached the lid. Six dogs, most of the party's rations, their tent and other
essential supplies disappeared into a massive crevasse 480 km east of the main
base. Mertz and Mawson spotted one dead and one injured dog on a ledge 46m down
but Ninnis was never seen again.

Mawson and Xavier Mertz turned back immediately. Their scanty provisions
forced them to eat their remaining sled dogs, unwittingly causing a quick
deterioration in the men's physical condition. The liver of one dog contains
enough vitamin A to produce the condition called Hypervitaminosis A.
Mertz became incapacitated and incoherent; in an attempt to nurse him back
to health, Mawson fed him most of the dog livers, which he considered more
nourishing than the tough muscle tissue. After Mertz died, Mawson continued
alone for 30 days. He cut his sled in half with a pen knife and dragged
the sled with geological specimens but minimal food 160 km back to the base
at Cape Denison. During the return trip to the Main Base, he fell through
the lid of a crevasse and was saved only by his sledge wedging itself into
the ice above him.

Vitamin A poisoning as the cause of Mertz's death is a later inference based
on the circumstances and symptoms; it was not widely known of even by polar
explorers at the time. Ironically, one of the destructive mechanisms of
vitamin A poisoning is liver damage.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Gene Wirchenko
2018-09-05 04:50:33 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Sep 2018 11:27:17 -0700 (PDT), ***@hotmail.com
wrote:

[snip]
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Vitamin A poisoning as the cause of Mertz's death is a later inference based
on the circumstances and symptoms; it was not widely known of even by polar
explorers at the time. Ironically, one of the destructive mechanisms of
vitamin A poisoning is liver damage.
Liver is a good source of iron. Is that irony, too?

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Robert Carnegie
2018-09-03 19:53:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In John Wyndham's 1951 novel _The Day of the Triffids_, the triffids are
mobile plants about ten feet high at maturity that can move themselves
about on their roots and have a poisonous sting on a tentacle-like
organ that they can shoot out like a chameleon's tongue. They are
farmed for their oil. The plant's origin is somewhat obscure, but
to the best knowledge of the narrator/protagonist they were developed
in the Soviet Union. They first came to the attention of the west
when a Soviet entrepreneur approached the Artic & European Fish
Oil Company with samples of a new vegetable oil. The company people
found it to be in the same category as but superior to their best
fish oils and were eager to assist the entrepreneur in bringing
it to market. Apparently, his attempt to fly out a plane-load
of the plants failed when his aircraft was shot down, but this
resulted in the wind-borne seeds being dispersed all over the
world. When the triffids started springing up the value of their
oil was recognized and, despite the obvious dangers, they became
the basis of a major industry.
From what I've read, at the present time fish oil is valued largely
as a source of long chain omega three fatty acids, essential to human
nutrition and particularly critical in fetal and infant brain
development. Was this recognized back in 1951? _The Day of the Triffids_
does not mention use as a nutritional supplement but seems to treat
triffid oil more as a high quality foodstuff like extra virgin olive oil.
I am interested in any information on this. Are there parts of the
world where fish oil is their traditional cooking oil? Are there
connoisseurs of fish oil? I admit to being surprised the first
time I saw a shop that sold primarily high-end olive oil
and vinegar.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Perhaps at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_oil#Uses>
you already saw that "as part of the diet" is the entire
information apart from wearing it or using it as an
alleged medicine (presently doubtful; if you can, just
eat fish).

The first useful looking site from adding "recipe"
to the search conditions wants an e-mail address before
I can see any, and it's not like I want a long term
relationship with them. But allegedly they exist.
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