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[tor dot com] Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
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James Nicoll
2018-11-04 15:17:50 UTC
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Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper

https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-11-04 16:41:52 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.

We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?

But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-04 17:31:12 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-11-04 18:59:44 UTC
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Permalink
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Sjouke Burry
2018-11-04 21:41:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
J. Clarke
2018-11-04 23:17:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua. Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec. I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Sjouke Burry
2018-11-06 00:43:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua. Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec. I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 01:19:51 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Sjouke Burry
2018-11-06 01:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua. Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec. I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
So we have no system to overtake such a lump of rock.
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 03:15:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 02:27:07 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua. Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec. I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
So we have no system to overtake such a lump of rock.
Which was my point. We knew how to develop such a system in the '60s.
We chose not to.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-06 06:23:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
So we have no system to overtake such a lump of rock.
Yup. And likely won't for a LONG time.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 12:18:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 22:23:16 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
So we have no system to overtake such a lump of rock.
Yup. And likely won't for a LONG time.
Probably some time not too long after SpaceX moves its headquarters
from Earth to Mars and thus removes itself from UN jurisdiction (the
UN can claim all the jurisdiction it wants, but it won't be able to do
anything about it except shout defiance at the sky, expecially if the
sky contains Orions).
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 02:35:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
Two books that I know have used that Orion drive, _Footfall_ and _Ark_.
Both were desperate situations.

Lynn
William Hyde
2018-11-06 20:42:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
Two books that I know have used that Orion drive, _Footfall_ and _Ark_.
Both were desperate situations.
Also, "Orion Shall Rise".

If by some odd chance you haven't read it, put it at the top of your SBR.

William Hyde
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-06 21:13:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
Two books that I know have used that Orion drive, _Footfall_ and _Ark_.
Both were desperate situations.
Also, "Orion Shall Rise".
If by some odd chance you haven't read it, put it at the top of your SBR.
William Hyde
Thanks ! I lost most of my Poul Anderson books in the great flood of '89.
https://www.amazon.com/Orion-Shall-Rise-Poul-Anderson/dp/0671720902/

Lynn
Greg Goss
2018-11-12 12:41:00 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Two books that I know have used that Orion drive, _Footfall_ and _Ark_.
Both were desperate situations.
Anderson wrote "Orion Shall Rise", which I read but remember
absolutely nothing about except vaguely a post-holocaust society
dominated by New Zealand.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 03:14:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 17:19:51 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact,
Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which?  'Oumuamua?  Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them.  Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence.  We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion.  Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was.  But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua.  Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec.  I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
There is no reason to believe that it would have "irradiated an entire
country". The big issue was the weapons in space treaty, which did
not make a distinction between nuclear explosive used as propulsion
element and nuclear explosive used as weapon. That and there was no
percieved requirement for such capability.
Gene Wirchenko
2018-11-06 20:32:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 22:14:33 -0500, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 17:19:51 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
[snip]
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dimensional Traveler
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
There is no reason to believe that it would have "irradiated an entire
country". The big issue was the weapons in space treaty, which did
"county" not "country".
Post by J. Clarke
not make a distinction between nuclear explosive used as propulsion
element and nuclear explosive used as weapon. That and there was no
percieved requirement for such capability.
Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
J. Clarke
2018-11-07 01:55:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 22:14:33 -0500, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 17:19:51 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
[snip]
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dimensional Traveler
The US started to back in the day but eventually decided that
irradiating an entire county made it not cost effective.
There is no reason to believe that it would have "irradiated an entire
country". The big issue was the weapons in space treaty, which did
"county" not "country".
Well even better, they already _have_ an entire county irradiated.
Post by Gene Wirchenko
Post by J. Clarke
not make a distinction between nuclear explosive used as propulsion
element and nuclear explosive used as weapon. That and there was no
percieved requirement for such capability.
Sincerely,
Gene Wirchenko
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 03:12:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 01:43:52 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 04 Nov 2018 22:41:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 4 Nov 2018 09:31:12 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Even big rockets were no option, because
any object coming from outside the solar system
has escape speed velocity, and when you want to join it in its
orbit you need an awfull lot of speed, and the way we do it
now is with speed assist from a few planets, which takes a few
years, to late to overtake such a rock.
Roughly 100 km/sec delta-v would be needed to rendezvous with
Oumuamua. Orion would have provided, depending on which version was
constructed, anywhere from 1000 km/sec to 10,000 km/sec. I believe
that that would suffice with very adequate margins.
Tell us, which country did develop that system?
The United States, to the extent that it was developed before the
Congress withdrew funding.,
Greg Goss
2018-11-05 12:37:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Much to my dilute fury, they've re-used the Orion name for something
else entirely.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 03:16:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by J. Clarke
Pity we didn't build Orion. Could have landed a crew on it and found
out what it really was. But with our little chemical rockets that
wasn't an option.
Much to my dilute fury, they've re-used the Orion name for something
else entirely.
I share your dilute fury. Another example of "controlling language".
Dan Tilque
2018-11-05 07:23:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
I remember there was speculation about 'Oumuamua being artificial
shortly after it was spotted and resolved enough to determine its long
relatively thin shape.
We didn't resolve the object with a telescope. The picture they show is
just an artist's impression. The shape was deduced from its light curve,
but even that length is not certain. There are papers that suggest that
it could be much less elongated, perhaps with length only 4 times its
width. I don't remember the exact arguments, but it involved the object
having a highly variable albedo. That is, the object may be mottled, so
different parts reflect different amounts of light.

When it first was discovered, I made jokes about it being a derelict
Star Destroyer, based on the on the reported length. But really, the
odds are it's just a random former planetesimal, ejected from its native
stellar system during planet formation. There are quadrillions of these
in the galaxy. Astronomers have been expecting to see one for quite some
time.
--
Dan Tilque
D B Davis
2018-11-04 18:52:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
Perry Rhodan begins with the discovery of an alien artifact on the dark
side of the moon less than twenty miles from its North Pole. It's a
perfectly spherical alien spaceship some 500 yards in diameter that
crashed on the moon four months earlier.
Obviously the aliens aboard the ship know the Earth's location, but
it's a relatively insignificant planet. Rhodan exploits that relative
insignificance to keep the Earth's location hidden from a galaxy that
brims with alien intelligence, some of it xenocidal.



Thank you,
--
Don
Greg Goss
2018-11-05 12:36:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
The new observation is that Ou-whatever is not quite following a
Kepler orbit. This means either that it's being pushed by expelled
gases like a comet (but no gases are observed), or it's being pushed
by light pressure (which means it's vastly lighter than would be
expected), or that there's some new science law that we don't know
yet.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
J. Clarke
2018-11-06 03:17:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
We *want* there to be alien intelligences, whether we hope for
them or fear them. Remember when the first quasars detected were
known as LGMs?
But so far we haven't a shred of evidence. We may get some
someday.
The new observation is that Ou-whatever is not quite following a
Kepler orbit. This means either that it's being pushed by expelled
gases like a comet (but no gases are observed), or it's being pushed
by light pressure (which means it's vastly lighter than would be
expected), or that there's some new science law that we don't know
yet.
Or that we better get cracking on that Orion because the
Fithp are coming . . .
Kevrob
2018-11-06 03:00:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Which? 'Oumuamua? Looks more to me like a chunk of asteroid
that got (a) melted by close approach to a star and (b) stretched
out by tidal forces.
If it "calved" from Oumuamua, does that mean that,
somewhere out in space is......Papa Oumuamua?

{....Surfin' Bird.....}

Kevin R

"I wanna be a Plexus Ranger...."
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-05 05:49:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
I speculate that half of the posters on this board are aliens !

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-05 23:22:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
I speculate that half of the posters on this board are aliens !
Lynn
Shazbot! I am discovered!
Jay E. Morris
2018-11-06 03:23:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
I speculate that half of the posters on this board are aliens !
Lynn
I really wish you hadn't noticed that Lynn.
Greg Goss
2018-11-05 12:34:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
There was a lot of speculation at the time, because of its unexpected
shape. This new observation is an official

"Hey, that's odd!"

Such exclamations fuel far more science than "Eureka", though the
eureka guys get all the awards,
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
James Nicoll
2018-11-05 14:55:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by James Nicoll
Recent Interstellar Asteroid May Have Been Alien Artifact, Speculates New Paper
https://www.tor.com/2018/11/04/recent-interstellar-asteroid-may-have-been-alien-artifact-speculates-new-paper/
There was a lot of speculation at the time, because of its unexpected
shape. This new observation is an official
"Hey, that's odd!"
Such exclamations fuel far more science than "Eureka", though the
eureka guys get all the awards,
Bearing in mind that even now Sithrak oils the spit, the detail that
puts this in the "well, maybe" is the remarkable unremarkableness of
it. It makes sense first contact would be via discarded trash and that
that trash would be something like a light sail, a mechanism with good
reason to be discarded or lost in space.

Its velocity, though, is pretty much what you'd expect from natural
debris.

I wish we'd caught sight of it before perihelion.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
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