Discussion:
This is troubling..
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-02-24 15:09:09 UTC
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From the _Locus_ "2019 Year In Review" issue (but online too):

https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/

2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020

NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.

(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)

A 20% drop?!

Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-02-24 16:11:34 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Perhaps the reviewer was speaking of what might be called "real"
science fiction, excluding fantasy?

Quote:

Only fantasy is mass-market. Everything else is cult-fiction.
[Reflective pause.] That includes mainstream.
-- a commissioning editor of a major publishing house, quoted by
T. A. Shippey, 2000

Of course, that *was* a couple decades ago. Perhaps fantasy is
slipping as well?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-02-24 16:33:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Perhaps the reviewer was speaking of what might be called "real"
science fiction, excluding fantasy?
Only fantasy is mass-market. Everything else is cult-fiction.
[Reflective pause.] That includes mainstream.
-- a commissioning editor of a major publishing house, quoted by
T. A. Shippey, 2000
Of course, that *was* a couple decades ago. Perhaps fantasy is
slipping as well?
Well, it's from scans (I guess, from "Bookscan"), so presumably it's
books explicitly classified by publishers as SF.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
a425couple
2020-02-24 17:37:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, ---
The decline was due in part to a lack of big bestsellers
Unit sales for adult fiction dropped 2.9%.
*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down 19.7%*
while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%.
Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but
young-adult fiction fell 8.1%.
By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Yes, 20% in one year sure seems surprising.
Big question of course, is, what do the 'insiders' think?

In a different arena, I'm reminded of this in yesterday's paper:

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/local-business/why-should-i-bother-to-come-downtown-macys-closure-highlights-challenges-for-seattles-retail-core/

(about a week ago, there were 3 different shootings in
the same downtown area.)

‘Why should I bother to come downtown?’: Macy’s closure highlights
challenges for Seattle’s retail core
Feb. 23, 2020 at 6:01 am
Last Tuesday, as Carol Gable Hare picked through the clearance bargains
at the Macy’s in downtown Seattle, the longtime customer found herself
wondering if she would keep shopping downtown after the store — one of
her favorites — shuts down Sunday.
“You have that feeling of, ‘Well, why should I bother to come
downtown?’” said the Queen Anne resident. “Which is sad.”
-----
Downtown Seattle “is at a tipping point,” said Jeff Green, a retail
analyst -- With so many alternatives online and at suburban shopping
centers, --- Many other retailers have preceded Macy’s in vacating
downtown Seattle ---

The exodus has been especially dramatic at Pacific Place, a five-level,
339,000 square-foot shopping center at Olive and Sixth, which as
recently as 2017 had about 50 tenants, according to a Puget Sound
Business Journal story that year. But the shopping center has lost a
number of national retailers — including Barneys, Barnes & Noble, Eddie
Bauer and Victoria’s Secret — hit hard by e-commerce and other industry
disruptions, and as of last week had just 21 tenants. --

“I don’t think we realized how much [retail] was changing and how fast
it was changing,” said Daniel Meyers of Madison Marquette, a Washington,
D.C.-based real estate company that paid $271 million for Pacific Place
in 2014 and an additional $87 million for the underground garage in 2016.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-02-24 17:44:50 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, ---
The decline was due in part to a lack of big bestsellers
Unit sales for adult fiction dropped 2.9%.
*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down 19.7%*
while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%.
Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but
young-adult fiction fell 8.1%.
By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Yes, 20% in one year sure seems surprising.
Big question of course, is, what do the 'insiders' think?
https://www.seattletimes.com/business/local-business/why-should-i-bother-to-come-downtown-macys-closure-highlights-challenges-for-seattles-retail-core/
(about a week ago, there were 3 different shootings in
the same downtown area.)
"Why should I bother to come downtown?": Macy's closure highlights
challenges for Seattle's retail core
The "Retail Apocalypse" has been an ongoing theme in my local
retail/nostalgia/etc blog:

http:/columbiaclosings.com/wordpress

our local "Macy's" is still open, but it's definitely in an iffy mall.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2020-02-24 17:51:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by a425couple
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
From the _Locus_ "2019 Year In Review" issue (but online
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, ---
The decline was due in part to a lack of big bestsellers
Unit sales for adult fiction dropped 2.9%.
*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down 19.7%*
while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%.
Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but
young-adult fiction fell 8.1%.
By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who
read more than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Yes, 20% in one year sure seems surprising.
Big question of course, is, what do the 'insiders' think?
https://www.seattletimes.com/business/local-business/why-should-i
-bother-to-come-downtown-macys-closure-highlights-challenges-for-
seattles-retail-core/
(about a week ago, there were 3 different shootings in
the same downtown area.)
"Why should I bother to come downtown?": Macy's closure
highlights challenges for Seattle's retail core
The "Retail Apocalypse" has been an ongoing theme in my local
The "retail apocalypse" is fiction, offered by people who have an
agenda is making you panic about it.

Fact is, while online retail is growing faster, brick & mortar
retail is growing, and at a pace faster than inflation.

For every store closing, there's five opening.

And 80% of the stores closing belong to one of about 20 big chains
(out of the millions of brick & mortar stores in the US).

Not even very *good* fiction, even in the "watch our news program
or you'll DIE!!!" media shills.
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
Joe Bernstein
2020-02-24 17:51:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
I find the drops in YA and mass market actually *more* troubling.
Horror and graphic novels both rose a bunch, sort of compensating for
SF dropping a bit more. But it's not like readers of YA, or people
poor enough that mass market is their main option, moved to other
books. (Well, OK, maybe graphic novels for the YA crowd.) And both
YA and mass market are strongly associated with spec-fic.

So this is a bad report all 'round, far as I'm concerned.

-- JLB
currently trying, but usually failing, to read a print YA book per
day, long story why.
Ahasuerus
2020-02-24 19:51:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more
than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
The billion dollar question is how much of the book market NPD
BookScan (previously known as Nielsen Bookscan) covers. To quote
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Bookstat reveals the hundreds of millions of additional online
book purchases from nonreporting publishers that [Nielsen]
PubTrack and the AAP [Statshots] are blind to — untracked sales
worth $1.25 billion a year.
I don't know enough about the topic to be able to tell how accurate
the claim is. The last time I looked into it, the numbers looked very
different depending on the sources that you used. It's conceivable
that the BookScan data primarily covers traditional SF publishers and
under-reports indie publishers which may be exhibiting different trends.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2020-02-24 23:40:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 10:09:11 AM UTC-5, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from
698.4 in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of
big bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in
political non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult
fiction dropped 2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the
biggest drop, down 19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim
0.5% drop, but young-adult fiction fell 8.1%. By format,
hardcovers basically held steady, up 0.3%, while trade
paperbacks dropped 0.7% and mass-market paperbacks fell
15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read
more than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
The billion dollar question is how much of the book market NPD
BookScan (previously known as Nielsen Bookscan) covers. To quote
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Bookstat reveals the hundreds of millions of additional online
book purchases from nonreporting publishers that [Nielsen]
PubTrack and the AAP [Statshots] are blind to — untracked
sales worth $1.25 billion a year.
I don't know enough about the topic to be able to tell how
accurate the claim is. The last time I looked into it, the
numbers looked very different depending on the sources that you
used. It's conceivable that the BookScan data primarily covers
traditional SF publishers and under-reports indie publishers
which may be exhibiting different trends.
Could be similar to what happened to music sales in the 90s, when
somebody manage to get accurate reporting on all retail sales,
instead of just record stores, and Country becamse the #1 genre.

Turned out, people only went to record stores for stuff that they
couldn't find at Sears or checkout line at the grocery store,
which, by definition, is the slow selling stuff.
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
Kevrob
2020-02-25 04:07:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 10:09:11 AM UTC-5, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from
698.4 in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of
big bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in
political non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult
fiction dropped 2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the
biggest drop, down 19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim
0.5% drop, but young-adult fiction fell 8.1%. By format,
hardcovers basically held steady, up 0.3%, while trade
paperbacks dropped 0.7% and mass-market paperbacks fell
15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read
more than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
The billion dollar question is how much of the book market NPD
BookScan (previously known as Nielsen Bookscan) covers. To quote
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Bookstat reveals the hundreds of millions of additional online
book purchases from nonreporting publishers that [Nielsen]
PubTrack and the AAP [Statshots] are blind to — untracked
sales worth $1.25 billion a year.
I don't know enough about the topic to be able to tell how
accurate the claim is. The last time I looked into it, the
numbers looked very different depending on the sources that you
used. It's conceivable that the BookScan data primarily covers
traditional SF publishers and under-reports indie publishers
which may be exhibiting different trends.
Could be similar to what happened to music sales in the 90s, when
somebody manage to get accurate reporting on all retail sales,
instead of just record stores, and Country becamse the #1 genre.
Turned out, people only went to record stores for stuff that they
couldn't find at Sears or checkout line at the grocery store,
which, by definition, is the slow selling stuff.
--
Quite so. The record stores got "Soundscan," and "Bookscan" came
out 10 years later. Soundscan became part of neilsen, the folks famous
for their TV ratings system, and the model was copied for Nielsen Bookscan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nielsen_SoundScan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nielsen_BookScan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NPD_BookScan {current
Bookscan owners}

Soundscan also gave a huge boost to hip-hop, metal and
"alternative rock," sales of which were, like country,
under-reported in the Billboard survey methods.

https://ultimateclassicrock.com/billboard-soundscan/

[quote]

BookScan captures cash-register sales of printed books. It does a pretty
good job with bookstores and full-line book departments, but not so well
in special sales of topical books sold by vertical retailers like knitting
shops or even museums. Publishers report their own ebook sales, so these
are captured on a delay from the reporting publishers, which does NOT
include independent authors. While Amazon does report its print sales
to BookScan, its ebook sales are a black hole.

/quote]

https://www.idealog.com/blog/changing-book-business-seems-flowing-downhill-amazon/

Maybe 75% of dead tree sales get reported to Bookscan, and the
books counted must have an ISBN. Are ebook sales more than replacing
the drop in printed SF&F sales? Hell if I know.

NPD has Bookstat, which gets ebook sales from participating publishers.


Kevin R
Magewolf
2020-02-25 18:06:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 10:09:11 AM UTC-5, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from
698.4 in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of
big bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in
political non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult
fiction dropped 2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the
biggest drop, down 19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and
graphic novels rose 16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim
0.5% drop, but young-adult fiction fell 8.1%. By format,
hardcovers basically held steady, up 0.3%, while trade
paperbacks dropped 0.7% and mass-market paperbacks fell
15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read
more than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
The billion dollar question is how much of the book market NPD
BookScan (previously known as Nielsen Bookscan) covers. To quote
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Bookstat reveals the hundreds of millions of additional online
book purchases from nonreporting publishers that [Nielsen]
PubTrack and the AAP [Statshots] are blind to — untracked
sales worth $1.25 billion a year.
I don't know enough about the topic to be able to tell how
accurate the claim is. The last time I looked into it, the
numbers looked very different depending on the sources that you
used. It's conceivable that the BookScan data primarily covers
traditional SF publishers and under-reports indie publishers
which may be exhibiting different trends.
Could be similar to what happened to music sales in the 90s, when
somebody manage to get accurate reporting on all retail sales,
instead of just record stores, and Country becamse the #1 genre.
Turned out, people only went to record stores for stuff that they
couldn't find at Sears or checkout line at the grocery store,
which, by definition, is the slow selling stuff.
--
Quite so. The record stores got "Soundscan," and "Bookscan" came
out 10 years later. Soundscan became part of neilsen, the folks famous
for their TV ratings system, and the model was copied for Nielsen Bookscan.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nielsen_SoundScan
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nielsen_BookScan
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NPD_BookScan {current
Bookscan owners}
Soundscan also gave a huge boost to hip-hop, metal and
"alternative rock," sales of which were, like country,
under-reported in the Billboard survey methods.
https://ultimateclassicrock.com/billboard-soundscan/
[quote]
BookScan captures cash-register sales of printed books. It does a pretty
good job with bookstores and full-line book departments, but not so well
in special sales of topical books sold by vertical retailers like knitting
shops or even museums. Publishers report their own ebook sales, so these
are captured on a delay from the reporting publishers, which does NOT
include independent authors. While Amazon does report its print sales
to BookScan, its ebook sales are a black hole.
/quote]
https://www.idealog.com/blog/changing-book-business-seems-flowing-downhill-amazon/
Maybe 75% of dead tree sales get reported to Bookscan, and the
books counted must have an ISBN. Are ebook sales more than replacing
the drop in printed SF&F sales? Hell if I know.
NPD has Bookstat, which gets ebook sales from participating publishers.
Kevin R
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-02-25 18:14:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ahasuerus
2020-02-25 22:31:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.

Re: sales figures, there are popular SF/F authors whose books are mostly
available as ISBN-free Amazon downloads. For example, consider Eric
Vall (https://www.amazon.com/Eric-Vall/e/B07HFFD82R), who was last
discussed a few months ago. He is #39 on Amazon's list of bestselling
SF/F authors (all formats) --
https://www.amazon.com/author-rank/Science-Fiction-Fantasy/books/25/
Pretty much all of his books are ISBN-less Kindle e-books and Audible
downloads.
David Johnston
2020-02-26 06:05:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.
You make it sound like you can't read it on both. You can.
Ahasuerus
2020-02-26 14:37:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.
You make it sound like you can't read it on both. You can.
It depends on whether we are talking "sequential" or "simultaneous". In
the former case, there is no limit. You can download an owned Kindle book
to an owned device, then delete it, download it to another device, then
delete it, etc ad infinitum. In the latter case, the answer is
apparently more complex. At one point an Amazon FAQ said
(https://android.stackexchange.com/questions/10094/if-i-buy-an-ebook-an-amazon-can-my-son-with-another-android-device-read-my-bo):

Most books you purchase from the Kindle store may be simultaneously
accessed for your personal use on up to six Kindles or Kindle-compatible
devices (such as Kindle for PC or Kindle for iPhone) registered to your
Amazon.com account. If the limit is less than six simultaneous copies for
a specific title, you'll see the message "Simultaneous Device usage: Up
to X simultaneous devices, per publisher limits" on the Amazon.com detail
page.

That FAQ page is no longer available. I am not sure what the current
limit is.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-02-26 14:54:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Johnston
On Tuesday, February 25, 2020 at 1:14:22 PM UTC-5, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of
tablets).
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a
superior format
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.
You make it sound like you can't read it on both. You can.
It depends on whether we are talking "sequential" or "simultaneous". In
the former case, there is no limit. You can download an owned Kindle book
to an owned device, then delete it, download it to another device, then
delete it, etc ad infinitum. In the latter case, the answer is
apparently more complex. At one point an Amazon FAQ said
Most books you purchase from the Kindle store may be simultaneously
accessed for your personal use on up to six Kindles or Kindle-compatible
devices (such as Kindle for PC or Kindle for iPhone) registered to your
Amazon.com account. If the limit is less than six simultaneous copies for
a specific title, you'll see the message "Simultaneous Device usage: Up
to X simultaneous devices, per publisher limits" on the Amazon.com detail
page.
That FAQ page is no longer available. I am not sure what the current
limit is.
Of course if you run it through Calibre+Alf to strip the DRM, it becomes a
non-issue anyway, although I'm sure this is a "< 1% of Kindle users" thing.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Paul S Person
2020-02-26 18:05:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
Post by David Johnston
On Tuesday, February 25, 2020 at 1:14:22 PM UTC-5, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of
tablets).
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a
superior format
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.
You make it sound like you can't read it on both. You can.
It depends on whether we are talking "sequential" or "simultaneous". In
the former case, there is no limit. You can download an owned Kindle book
to an owned device, then delete it, download it to another device, then
delete it, etc ad infinitum. In the latter case, the answer is
apparently more complex. At one point an Amazon FAQ said
Most books you purchase from the Kindle store may be simultaneously
accessed for your personal use on up to six Kindles or Kindle-compatible
devices (such as Kindle for PC or Kindle for iPhone) registered to your
Amazon.com account. If the limit is less than six simultaneous copies for
a specific title, you'll see the message "Simultaneous Device usage: Up
to X simultaneous devices, per publisher limits" on the Amazon.com detail
page.
That FAQ page is no longer available. I am not sure what the current
limit is.
Of course if you run it through Calibre+Alf to strip the DRM, it becomes a
non-issue anyway, although I'm sure this is a "< 1% of Kindle users" thing.
I thought the whole /point/ to Synchronization was that you could read
it on two or more devices and always start just where you left off.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2020-02-26 22:29:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by David Johnston
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
When you buy an e-book from Amazon, it gets added to your account. You
can then select which owned device you want to read it on. If you own
a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, you can read the book on either device.
You make it sound like you can't read it on both. You can.
It depends on whether we are talking "sequential" or "simultaneous". In
the former case, there is no limit. You can download an owned Kindle book
to an owned device, then delete it, download it to another device, then
delete it, etc ad infinitum. In the latter case, the answer is
apparently more complex. At one point an Amazon FAQ said
Most books you purchase from the Kindle store may be simultaneously
accessed for your personal use on up to six Kindles or Kindle-compatible
devices (such as Kindle for PC or Kindle for iPhone) registered to your
Amazon.com account. If the limit is less than six simultaneous copies for
a specific title, you'll see the message "Simultaneous Device usage: Up
to X simultaneous devices, per publisher limits" on the Amazon.com detail
page.
That FAQ page is no longer available. I am not sure what the current
limit is.
The information is probably out of date. I think
when they say "personal" use they mean exactly that,
and "you" are not expected to read books on more than
one device at exactly the same time. If you're thinking
"dictionary", my Kindle seems to have dictionary look-up
built in...

The question asked was about sharing books with your son,
either a child or an adult. Current information provides
for <https://www.amazon.co.uk/myh/households>
in which up to two adult accounts and up to four
"child" accounts can be associated in one "family"
or "household" that can share bought books.
That does amount to six readers, and I think I saw
a rule previously that there's a limit of 6 months /
180 days on exiting one "household" relationship
and/or joining another, which is bad news for bigamists,
who may find their situation hard to explain.
Is this why Carl doesn't go to Amazon......
Chrysi Cat
2020-02-26 11:07:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Magewolf
From what I remember for the last couple of years e-books have been
static and e-book reader sales have been down(probably because of tablets).
I thought Amazon didn't release ebook sales? On readers, I wouldn't doubt
but that you are right on e-ink type devices (though it is a superior format
in many cases). Of course, a "Kindle Fire", *is* a "Kindle"...
Heck, the Kindle app is available for virtually any smartphone or
tablet. I have it installed on my iPad G6 to read my Kindle Unlimited
library, while my Baen books go to iBooks when I can afford a new
installment of Ring of Fire.

*Really* makes device-sales numbers misleading as to what the total
potential market for an ebook is.

I mean, yes, not e-ink, but still a lot easier on my eyes than a
landscape-mode monitor behind a keyboard, and in addition able to handle
colour (since I also plan to activate subscriptions to the major
comic-book archives one of these days, that's a big deal).
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2020-03-22 13:42:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more
than a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
The billion dollar question is how much of the book market NPD
BookScan (previously known as Nielsen Bookscan) covers. To quote
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Bookstat reveals the hundreds of millions of additional online
book purchases from nonreporting publishers that [Nielsen]
PubTrack and the AAP [Statshots] are blind to — untracked sales
worth $1.25 billion a year.
I don't know enough about the topic to be able to tell how accurate
the claim is.
And since Bookstat basically says "if you don't make like $10 million a
year, don't ask us for the info", none of us are likely to be able to
check.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
t***@gmail.com
2020-02-25 12:51:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
https://locusmag.com/2020/02/2019-book-sales/
2019 Book Sales
February 22, 2020
NPD BookScan reported unit sales for print books dropped
1.3% in 2019, with 689.5 million units sold, down from 698.4
in 2018. The decline was due in part to a lack of big
bestsellers to compare with the massive interest in political
non-fiction in 2018. Unit sales for adult fiction dropped
2.9%. <<*By genre, science fiction had the biggest drop, down
19.7%*>>, while horror rose 16.6% and graphic novels rose
16.1%. Juvenile fiction had a slim 0.5% drop, but young-adult
fiction fell 8.1%. By format, hardcovers basically held
steady, up 0.3%, while trade paperbacks dropped 0.7% and
mass-market paperbacks fell 15.3%.
(<<*Emphasis Mine*>>)
A 20% drop?!
Not saying it's wrong, but it makes me question what data they're using,
how they're collecting it, etc. Of course, as someone said else-thread,
what may matter most is if the decision makers believe it or not.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Of course this is for print, and I suspect most people who read more than
a book a month use ebooks now, but still..
Maybe I'm an exception that helps prove the rule. I simply haven't found
a good way to read anything but (short) articles electronically.[1]
- Tony
[1] I am aware there are a zillion platforms and readers and settings, etc.
I'll figure something out if/when I need to.
Jack Bohn
2020-02-25 17:09:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 10:09:11 AM UTC-5, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote: 
 
A 20% drop?! 
Not saying it's wrong, but it makes me question what data they're using, 
how they're collecting it, etc. Of course, as someone said else-thread, 
what may matter most is if the decision makers believe it or not.
From what I've read of BookScan elsewhere, they are firmly of the "science fiction is a marketing category" school, and the publisher declares what category a book is in. That seems fair enough; the data is made to be sold to the publisher. As a first approximation, these are thd books in a chain's "sf" section (where Wells is mostly in "classics," Vonnegut is in "literature," and a hardcopy of a webcomic might be in "humor" with the newspaper strips). If I read one guy's work correctly, a book can be assigned multiple category identifiers, but data can only be pulled from the first category assigned. My first thought is a publisher changing the first category of their line, or part of it, hiding the sales figures of those books. And leaving the question of where to go to get "the good stuff" -- "technothrillers: far future"? "westerns: interstellar"?
--
-Jack
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