Discussion:
[Because My Tears Are Delicious To You] Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
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James Nicoll
2018-07-15 13:50:26 UTC
Permalink
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan

https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
D B Davis
2018-07-21 14:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
In "The Airlords of Han" the Han use groundships that "draw but lightly
upon the power broadcast from the city." Nowlan probably got this idea
from Telsa [1], no?

Note.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer#Tesla



Thank you,
--
Don
Kevrob
2018-07-22 03:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
In "The Airlords of Han" the Han use groundships that "draw but lightly
upon the power broadcast from the city." Nowlan probably got this idea
from Telsa [1], no?
Note.
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer#Tesla

I read this when Ace reprinted it in paperback, (c) 1978,
ISBN 0441029396, subtitled " The Seminal "Buck Rogers" Novel."

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?155521

Notes that:

"This edition has been specially revised and updated for the
modern reader by noted science fiction critic and Hugo Award
winning author, Spider Robinson."

I was a fan of the movie serial, that WPIX-TV, New York, had run
daily chapters of when I was a kid in the 1960s. I also enjoyed
"Cousin" Spider's work, so I snapped this up.

I seem to remember that the "Han are part-alien" idea came across
as what we would soon call a "retcon." {We did already have
Doug Moench's RAMPAGING HULK, with its pre-AVENGERS #1 "Continuity
Implant" stories}

Kevin R
D B Davis
2018-07-22 05:10:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by D B Davis
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
In "The Airlords of Han" the Han use groundships that "draw but lightly
upon the power broadcast from the city." Nowlan probably got this idea
from Telsa [1], no?
Note.
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer#Tesla
I read this when Ace reprinted it in paperback, (c) 1978,
ISBN 0441029396, subtitled " The Seminal "Buck Rogers" Novel."
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?155521
"This edition has been specially revised and updated for the
modern reader by noted science fiction critic and Hugo Award
winning author, Spider Robinson."
I was a fan of the movie serial, that WPIX-TV, New York, had run
daily chapters of when I was a kid in the 1960s. I also enjoyed
"Cousin" Spider's work, so I snapped this up.
I seem to remember that the "Han are part-alien" idea came across
as what we would soon call a "retcon." {We did already have
Doug Moench's RAMPAGING HULK, with its pre-AVENGERS #1 "Continuity
Implant" stories}
"The Airlords of Han" first appears in the March 1929 edition of
_Amazing Stories_. The first sentence of the first paragraph in the
story is:

In a previous record of my adventures in the early part of the
Second War of Independence I explained how I, Anthony Rogers,
was overcome by radioactive gases in an abandoned mine near
Scranton in the year 1927, where I existed in a state of
suspended animation for nearly five hundred years; and awakened
to fin that the America I knew had been crushed under the cruel
tyranny of the Han, fierce Mongolians, who, as scientists now
contend, had in their blood a taint not of this earth, and who
with science and resources far in advance of those of a United
States, economically prostrate at the end of a long series of
wars with a Bolshevik Europe, in the year 2207 A.D., had
swept down from the ...

Mercy! The whole first paragraph consists of a single sentence.
"Armageddon-2419 A.D." has Mongolians subjugate Russia to set the
stage for world domination by the Han. Events leading up to the Sino-
Soviet conflict of 1929 [1] possibly influenced Nowlan.
There is a history of Mongol domination over Russia. [2] Perhaps
earlier history inspired Nowland.

Note.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Soviet_conflict_(1929)
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kulikovo



Thank you,
--
Don
Kevrob
2018-07-22 14:11:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Post by D B Davis
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
In "The Airlords of Han" the Han use groundships that "draw but lightly
upon the power broadcast from the city." Nowlan probably got this idea
from Telsa [1], no?
Note.
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer#Tesla
I read this when Ace reprinted it in paperback, (c) 1978,
ISBN 0441029396, subtitled " The Seminal "Buck Rogers" Novel."
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?155521
"This edition has been specially revised and updated for the
modern reader by noted science fiction critic and Hugo Award
winning author, Spider Robinson."
I was a fan of the movie serial, that WPIX-TV, New York, had run
daily chapters of when I was a kid in the 1960s. I also enjoyed
"Cousin" Spider's work, so I snapped this up.
I seem to remember that the "Han are part-alien" idea came across
as what we would soon call a "retcon." {We did already have
Doug Moench's RAMPAGING HULK, with its pre-AVENGERS #1 "Continuity
Implant" stories}
"The Airlords of Han" first appears in the March 1929 edition of
_Amazing Stories_. The first sentence of the first paragraph in the
In a previous record of my adventures in the early part of the
Second War of Independence I explained how I, Anthony Rogers,
was overcome by radioactive gases in an abandoned mine near
Scranton in the year 1927, where I existed in a state of
suspended animation for nearly five hundred years; and awakened
to fin that the America I knew had been crushed under the cruel
tyranny of the Han, fierce Mongolians, who, as scientists now
contend, had in their blood a taint not of this earth, and who
with science and resources far in advance of those of a United
States, economically prostrate at the end of a long series of
wars with a Bolshevik Europe, in the year 2207 A.D., had
swept down from the ...
Mercy! The whole first paragraph consists of a single sentence.
"Armageddon-2419 A.D." has Mongolians subjugate Russia to set the
stage for world domination by the Han. Events leading up to the Sino-
Soviet conflict of 1929 [1] possibly influenced Nowlan.
There is a history of Mongol domination over Russia. [2] Perhaps
earlier history inspired Nowland.
Note.
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Soviet_conflict_(1929)
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kulikovo
Good to know! It has been 38 years since I read that volume,
which apparently was a fix-up of the two Anthony Rogers tales.
Thanks.

Kevin R
Quadibloc
2018-07-22 06:21:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
When will you start reading serious literature instead of all that Buck Rogers
stuff?

John Savard
Kevrob
2018-07-22 14:19:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
When will you start reading serious literature instead of all that Buck Rogers
stuff?
I've often said that we have George Lucas to thank for
that phrase slipping out of the vernacular. When President
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative was being debated,
media shorthand got an upgrade to "Star Wars."

and 5 years ago, there was this;

https://www.wired.com/2013/01/white-house-death-star/

Kevin R
D B Davis
2018-07-22 14:56:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
When will you start reading serious literature instead of all that Buck Rogers
stuff?
Serious literature talks about a Venetian named Marco Polo. Venetian
merchants collaborated with homicidal Mongol Khans. Venetian merchants
had final control over the western terminus of the Mongols' "Silk Road."
In "Armageddon--2419 A.D." Nowlan has the Sinsing Gang collaborate
with the Han. Perhaps Shakespeare's Venetian tales, or history itself,
inspired Nowlan.



Thank you,
--
Don
Dan Tilque
2018-07-24 09:14:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
I had not read this story before. But because of James' review, I
decided to try it out. I made it to about halfway through the second
part before giving up. And that was after mostly skipping the info dump
about how the tech works in that future near the beginning of part 2.

There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.

Conclusion: this story is exemplifies why people who read literature
disparaged SF. With very good reason.
--
Dan Tilque
D B Davis
2018-07-24 12:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
I had not read this story before. But because of James' review, I
decided to try it out. I made it to about halfway through the second
part before giving up. And that was after mostly skipping the info dump
about how the tech works in that future near the beginning of part 2.
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
Conclusion: this story is exemplifies why people who read literature
disparaged SF. With very good reason.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
You're in good company, or at least /literate/ company, with your
need for character development. _The Art of Dramatic Writing_ (Egri)
also values character development.
The info in _The Airlords of Han_, the part the bored you enough to
make you skip it, is valued by me. This part of the story in particular
intrigues me:

the atomic laboratories hidden beneath the forests, had
outdone themselves in [inerton rocket] construction.
Their release of atomic force was nearly one hundred
percent, and each one of them was equal to many hundred
tons of trinitroluol, which I had known in the First
World War, five hundred years before, as "T.N.T."

The "Trinity" nuclear explosion, which occurred in 1945, achieved
18-20 kilotons of TNT equivalent. _Airlords_, which appears 1929, does a
fairly decent job of predicting nuclear yields that were achieved
sixteen years later, under Top Secret conditions. Nowlan also specifies
an /atomic/ bomb rather than a /radium/ bomb. Radium seems to appear
more often in the science fiction of Nowlan's era.
Accurate prognostication is one of things the specifically draws me
to science fiction rather than the great literature that develops
character.
(Great literature that develops character in more ways than one? As
in "eat your spinach it's good for you?" LOL.)
Science fiction's political discourse is another thing that draws me
in. This part of _Airlords_ provides me with food-for-thought:

"The Heaven Born has had a whim."
"And who," I asked, "is this Heaven Born?"
"San-Lan," he replied, "misbegotten spawn of the late High
Priestess Nlui-Mok, and now Most Glorious Air Lord of All the
Hans." He rolled out these titles with a bow of exaggerated
respect toward the West, and in a tone of mockery. Those of
his men who were near enough to hear, snickered and giggled.
I was to learn that this amazing attitude of his was
typical rather than exceptional. Strange as it may seem, no
Han rendered any respect to another, nor expected it in
return; that is, not genuine respect. Their discipline was
rigid and cold-bloodedly heartless. The most elaborate
courtesies were demanded and accorded among equals and from
inferiors to superiors, but such was the intelligence and
moral degradation of this remarkable race, that every one of
them recognized these courtesies for what they were; they
must necessity have been hollow mockeries. They took pleasure
in forcing one another to go through with them, each trying
to outdo the other in cynical, sardonic thrusts, clothed in
the most meticulously ceremonious courtesy. As a matter of
fact, my captor, by this crude reference to the origin of
his ruler, was merely proving himself a crude fellow, guilty
of a vulgarity rather than of a treasonable or disrespectful
remark. An officer of higher rank and better breeding, would
have managed a clever innuendo, less direct, but equally
plain.

"No respect for rivals?" Gee, that sounds identical to sarcastic
Anglo-spherical discourse. Science fiction often disguises political
plain talk as applicable to The Other in order to prevent the status quo
from getting its fragile ego bruised. That tactic ensures plausible
deniability.
In regards to the above excerpt, how does an officer of higher rank
and better breeding say it? "Dropped from the clouds spawn" perhaps?



Thank you,
--
Don
Dan Tilque
2018-07-24 21:35:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is

| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."

Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
--
Dan Tilque
Robert Carnegie
2018-07-24 22:19:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is
| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."
Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
I take it that they're talking about going into danger
with the real risk or practical certainty of death -
but not that if he dies then she intends to die as well.
That point of view exists, but I read it that she intends
to be by his side as the enemy rays him out of existence,
but to ray back at them, not to de-exist herself as well
if it can be avoided in the circumstance.

Radio detective Paul Temple, currently being repeated
by the BBC, has a moment in most adventures where peopke
are regularly trying to kill him and so he suggests to
his wife, named Steve, long story, that one of them should
break off and take a holiday somewhere more quiet, although
how she will solve the mystery in his absence isn't
explained - anyway, she nearly always says no. Otherwise
he'd be stuck for somebody to explain the plot to for our
benefit, especially at the end. "The Spencer Affair"
includes a mysterious stolen goods fencer called Spencer
who must be one of the other named characters who hasn't
already been murdered, one or more mysterious statements
by the murder victims, at least two sinister night clubs,
and a mysterious disc recording of a song called
"My Heart and Harry" which I think I remember
was devised by Spencer specifically so that Paul Temple
would have to investigate it and be distracted from what
the gang is actually up to, nearly all of which is typical
of the series, so, someone to explain all this to is
indispensable.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-07-24 23:43:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is
| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."
Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
I take it that they're talking about going into danger
with the real risk or practical certainty of death -
but not that if he dies then she intends to die as well.
That point of view exists, but I read it that she intends
to be by his side as the enemy rays him out of existence,
but to ray back at them, not to de-exist herself as well
if it can be avoided in the circumstance.
In what I suspect was the context it seemed obvious to me that Wilma was
saying she'd die with him. Because only a woman that manly could be
woman enough for the truly manly Man hero. <insert Manly Man pose here>
(Hint: think Conan the Barbarian and what kind of woman he wants. Its
the same genre.)
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
D B Davis
2018-07-25 13:18:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is
| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."
Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
I take it that they're talking about going into danger
with the real risk or practical certainty of death -
but not that if he dies then she intends to die as well.
That point of view exists, but I read it that she intends
to be by his side as the enemy rays him out of existence,
but to ray back at them, not to de-exist herself as well
if it can be avoided in the circumstance.
In what I suspect was the context it seemed obvious to me that Wilma was
saying she'd die with him. Because only a woman that manly could be
woman enough for the truly manly Man hero. <insert Manly Man pose here>
(Hint: think Conan the Barbarian and what kind of woman he wants. Its
the same genre.)
My knowledge of Conan is limited. Wilma's in the driver's seat in
"Armageddon." So, it's not about her being manly enough for him (unless
that's a reader expectation). It's more about Wilma wanting a Conan
(doll?) than anything.
Rodgers (Conan?) seems to intrigue everybody. He's an anachronism.
Nostalgia may account for some of his allure. Rogers is physically
larger and stronger then contemporary men (just like Conan?). Modern
psychological techniques do not work on Rogers' more primitive mind. His
old school thought process tends to take everybody by surprise.



Thank you,
--
Don
p***@hotmail.com
2018-07-25 03:20:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is
| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."
Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
There was something like this in _Skylark DuQuesne_. Richard Seaton was
going on a reconnaissance infiltration mission to one of the human
slave planets in the chloran galaxy and Dorothy insisted on being
part of the team. Over the years she had come around to the
Osnomian point of view that spouses should share risks.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
D B Davis
2018-07-25 13:17:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dan Tilque
Post by James Nicoll
Armageddon--2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/blessed-with-beauty-and-rage
There's absolutely no character development, even though there were
several places where there should have been some. There's one place in
particular where he gives what would have been a bombshell for 1929
audiences to Wilma and absolutely nothing was done with the line. There
should have been an argument between Tony and Wilma about it and there
wasn't anything. Perhaps he didn't write it or the editors ruthlessly
removed it. Whatever the reason, it really degrades the story.
To each his own. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
You lost me in regards to the degrading thing that should have been
a bombshell for 1929. Do you care to elaborate?
This line in specific is
| "If you 'go into zero' (a common expression of the day for being
| annihilated by the disintegrator ray), you don't think I'm going to
| let you go alone, do you, Tony? I couldn't believe my ears last night
| when you spoke of going without me, until I realized that you are
| still five hundred years behind the times in lots of ways. Don't you
| know, dear heart, that you offered me the greatest insult a husband
| could give a wife? You didn't, of course."
Now there's no doubt some men from the first half of the 20th century
who would have taken that with no disagreement. Not very many, I bet,
but it makes for poor fiction that Tony is one of them. Here's a prime
opportunity for the author to engage in character development and yet
it's just dropped.
Now that you mention it, that piece of prose is quite jarring. Why
bother introducing a notion in the first place unless you're going to
follow it up?



Thank you,
--
Don
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