Discussion:
[OT] Is Nothing Sacred? (Prepositions.)
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Quadibloc
2019-11-01 16:53:00 UTC
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Just found this...

https://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/07/04/churchill-preposition/

So the old story of Winston Churchill being the one who identified the rule about
not ending a sentence in a preposition as "nonsense up with which I shall not put"
is apocryphal.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-11-01 17:39:47 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Just found this...
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/07/04/churchill-preposition/
So the old story of Winston Churchill being the one who identified the rule about
not ending a sentence in a preposition as "nonsense up with which I shall not put"
is apocryphal.
As the old monk said about the doubt-worthy saint's life, "Si
non e vero, e ben trovato." Which translates as "If it isn't
true, it's [still] a good story."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2019-11-02 17:12:16 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Just found this...
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/07/04/churchill-preposition/
So the old story of Winston Churchill being the one who identified the rule about
not ending a sentence in a preposition as "nonsense up with which I shall not put"
is apocryphal.
I thought of this too late for the prior discussion:

If "to put up with" is regarded as an /infinitive/, then

"which I will not put up with"
and
"which I will not eat"

become the same construction: "which" is the direct object of a
transitive verb.

But you have to avoid the "English is really Latin" mind-set.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-11-02 20:18:58 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Just found this...
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/07/04/churchill-preposition/
So the old story of Winston Churchill being the one who identified the
rule about
Post by Quadibloc
not ending a sentence in a preposition as "nonsense up with which I
shall not put"
Post by Quadibloc
is apocryphal.
If "to put up with" is regarded as an /infinitive/, then
"which I will not put up with"
and
"which I will not eat"
become the same construction: "which" is the direct object of a
transitive verb.
But you have to avoid the "English is really Latin" mind-set.
Yup.

/e searches "quotes" file

"I lately lost a preposition;
It fell, I thought, beneath my chair.
And angrily I cried, 'Perdition!
Up from out of under there!'

"Correctness is my vade mecum,
And straggling phrases I abhor;
And yet I wondered, 'What should he come
Up from out of under for?'"
-- Morris Bishop
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
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