Discussion:
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2021-07-16 18:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16

Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2021-07-16 21:10:52 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
John W Kennedy
2021-07-16 23:19:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
Well, in this cartoon, the swords are longer than the swordsmen are
tall, have roughly 2" blades, and at least one of them has a
swordbreaker guard. About as different from a fencing foil as you can get.
--
John W. Kennedy
"The blind rulers of Logres
Nourished the land on a fallacy of rational virtue."
-- Charles Williams. "Taliessin through Logres: Prelude"
J. Clarke
2021-07-17 00:45:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
Lemme guess--you've never had the tiniest bit of sex?
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-07-17 04:55:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
Lemme guess--you've never had the tiniest bit of sex?
Bzzzzzt!

I have been happily married for fifty years, have two grown
children and three grandchildren. Any further information is
available on a need-to-know basis, and you don't need to know.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Gary R. Schmidt
2021-07-17 02:48:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.


Cheers,
Gary B-)

1 - You can imagine the acute accent yourselves. :-)
--
Waiting for a new signature to suggest itself...
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-07-17 04:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Gary R. Schmidt
2021-07-17 13:29:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
Oh, if it was up to specifications very unlikely to shatter.

The problem was the various Eastern European and Chinese manufacturers
(to use the term loosely) who produced not-up-to-specification masks,
which could/would/did shatter, and, well, every sport has its
cheapskates, so in the end it was easier to go back to the mesh masks,
which can be tested without destroying them.

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
Waiting for a new signature to suggest itself...
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-07-17 13:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
Oh, if it was up to specifications very unlikely to shatter.
The problem was the various Eastern European and Chinese manufacturers
(to use the term loosely) who produced not-up-to-specification masks,
which could/would/did shatter, and, well, every sport has its
cheapskates, so in the end it was easier to go back to the mesh masks,
which can be tested without destroying them.
And they were right to do so.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2021-07-17 16:30:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jul 2021 23:29:36 +1000, "Gary R. Schmidt"
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
Oh, if it was up to specifications very unlikely to shatter.
The problem was the various Eastern European and Chinese manufacturers
(to use the term loosely) who produced not-up-to-specification masks,
which could/would/did shatter, and, well, every sport has its
cheapskates, so in the end it was easier to go back to the mesh masks,
which can be tested without destroying them.
There are sampling procedures that can determine how many masks must
be tested-to-destruction before you can be sure (95%, 99%, 99.9999%,
whatever you want) that the entire lot is OK.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Gary R. Schmidt
2021-07-18 03:42:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Sat, 17 Jul 2021 23:29:36 +1000, "Gary R. Schmidt"
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
Oh, if it was up to specifications very unlikely to shatter.
The problem was the various Eastern European and Chinese manufacturers
(to use the term loosely) who produced not-up-to-specification masks,
which could/would/did shatter, and, well, every sport has its
cheapskates, so in the end it was easier to go back to the mesh masks,
which can be tested without destroying them.
There are sampling procedures that can determine how many masks must
be tested-to-destruction before you can be sure (95%, 99%, 99.9999%,
whatever you want) that the entire lot is OK.
Yes, we know that, but if the people manufacturing and/or selling them
don't do any of that...

Or, even more astonishing, /lie/ about it...

I can rock up (modulo COVID-19 restrictions) at an FIE tournament and
have my ancient mask tested, all that it shows is a small dimple.

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
Waiting for a new signature to suggest itself...
Paul S Person
2021-07-18 15:49:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Jul 2021 13:42:51 +1000, "Gary R. Schmidt"
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Paul S Person
On Sat, 17 Jul 2021 23:29:36 +1000, "Gary R. Schmidt"
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:09:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
Was it here that someone observed that fencing is the perfect sport
for the pandemic--you always wear a mask and gloves and if anybody
comes within 6 feet of you you get to poke them with a sword.
Well, a fencing foil is not six feet long; more like three. Hold
that at the full extension of your arm and you'll get *near* to
six feet; more to the point, you can point it at someone whom you
can't quite reach and say, "Get any closer and I'll puncture
you!"
An epee[1] is closer to a meter, so that's a better choice. ;-)
But a fencing mask is made of metal mesh (held on by canvas).
It's meant to keep you from losing an eye; no barrier whatever to
bacteria nor viruses.
I'm sure I've mentioned before that there was a recent period in fencing
where clear plastic masks were the thing. They stopped being the thing
because there were too many shonky jobs that didn't meet the required
safety standards.
You probably recall correctly, although I don't remember that
subject. How tough was the plastic? how likely to shatter?
Oh, if it was up to specifications very unlikely to shatter.
The problem was the various Eastern European and Chinese manufacturers
(to use the term loosely) who produced not-up-to-specification masks,
which could/would/did shatter, and, well, every sport has its
cheapskates, so in the end it was easier to go back to the mesh masks,
which can be tested without destroying them.
There are sampling procedures that can determine how many masks must
be tested-to-destruction before you can be sure (95%, 99%, 99.9999%,
whatever you want) that the entire lot is OK.
Yes, we know that, but if the people manufacturing and/or selling them
don't do any of that...
Or, even more astonishing, /lie/ about it...
I can rock up (modulo COVID-19 restrictions) at an FIE tournament and
have my ancient mask tested, all that it shows is a small dimple.
The point is, /you/ can test each lot and send it back for a refund if
it fails the test.

OTOH, if you continually get lots are that defective ... then, yes,
rejecting the entire product line (ie, going back to the old-style
masks) is a good idea.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-07-16 21:16:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.

And thereby hangs a tale.

Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.

A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.

The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2021-07-16 21:46:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.
And thereby hangs a tale.
Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.
A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.
The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
It's fortunate that it was well made. I remember an upperclassman at
the Boat School drawing his sword during a formation and throwing the
blade (which apparently had a very tiny tang) halfway across T-court.
Fortunately it didn't hit anybody.
Kevrob
2021-07-16 22:01:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.
Id could have borrowed the tridents wielded by the Roman Retiarii.
Those were pretty long. Jousting is pretty socially distant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retiarius

That'd be a good name for a web-based security tool, no?
And thereby hangs a tale.
Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.
A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.
The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
--
The US House of Representatives has its own mace,
a custom carried over from Britain, where the monarch,
Lords and Commons all have their own, along with other
governmental and academic versions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_of_the_United_States_House_of_Representatives

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceremonial_maces_in_the_United_Kingdom

We copied the academic maces from the Brits, also.
--
Kevin R
William Hyde
2021-07-17 21:21:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.
Id could have borrowed the tridents wielded by the Roman Retiarii.
Those were pretty long. Jousting is pretty socially distant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retiarius
That'd be a good name for a web-based security tool, no?
And thereby hangs a tale.
Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.
A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.
The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
--
The US House of Representatives has its own mace,
a custom carried over from Britain, where the monarch,
Lords and Commons all have their own, along with other
governmental and academic versions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_of_the_United_States_House_of_Representatives
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceremonial_maces_in_the_United_Kingdom
We copied the academic maces from the Brits, also.
And some at least are sturdily constructed.

In a debate here many years ago a participant, unschooled in the ways of discussion, threw the mace
at an ambassador who, perhaps used to ducking thrown objects, smoothly evaded the missile which
hit the wall rather hard. But remained intact.

The tradition of open debate was not quite so uninjured, of course, not so much by the act
as by expressions of support for it from people who should have known better.

William Hyde
John W Kennedy
2021-07-16 23:06:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.
And thereby hangs a tale.
Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.
A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.
The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
English ceremonial maces are, in fact, upside-down. The big-ol’
crownlike head is actually a grossly hypertrophied pommel, and the
actual warhead has shrunken down to a nub. I don’t know about ceremonial
maces for American universities, but I’d be inclined to guess that a
colonial-era, historically Church-of-England university like Columbia
(originally “King’s”) would probably follow the English example.
--
John W. Kennedy
"The blind rulers of Logres
Nourished the land on a fallacy of rational virtue."
-- Charles Williams. "Taliessin through Logres: Prelude"
pete...@gmail.com
2021-07-17 05:00:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by John W Kennedy
Post by Lynn McGuire
Wizard of Id: Social Distancing Knights
https://www.gocomics.com/wizardofid/2021/07/16
Shoot, I doubt that they can hold up those eight foot broadswords for
more than a few minutes with one hand. And I doubt that they can even
swing the broadswords with one hand.
I think we can assume that are six feet long, not eight. If they
were more like four feet, they would be greatswords and wielded
by both hands. Anything really huge, swords or maces or what
not, would have been for ceremonial use, not actual fighting.
And thereby hangs a tale.
Back in the sixties, when students at many universities were
protesting things like the war in Vietname, Columbia University
was holding its graduation exercises, and there was a ceremonial
procession of senior faculty and administration up to the podium.
One of these worthies was a professor emeritus of history, who
was carrying the official Mace of the University. This was a
long handle with a round knob on its top end.
A student decided to charge into the line and make trouble. So
the professor emeritus of history swung the ceremonial mace and
conked the student over the head. I don't think the guy was
badly hurt, but it brought him down and the procession could
proceed while the campus cops hauled the protestor away.
The professor explained to the press afterwards that the mace
was a symbolic rendering of a real mace, which would have been a
club for hitting one's opponents over the head.
English ceremonial maces are, in fact, upside-down. The big-ol’
crownlike head is actually a grossly hypertrophied pommel, and the
actual warhead has shrunken down to a nub. I don’t know about ceremonial
maces for American universities, but I’d be inclined to guess that a
colonial-era, historically Church-of-England university like Columbia
(originally “King’s”) would probably follow the English example.
Cite? I'm not doubting you, I simply want more info.

Pt
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