Discussion:
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-01 19:08:20 UTC
Permalink
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
https://www.amazon.com/Earth-Abides-George-R-Stewart/dp/0345487133/

A standalone apocalyptic novel about a plague of unprecedented virulence
first published in 1949. I read the well printed and bound trade
paperback published in 2006 with an introduction by Connie Willis.
"Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It
was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction
in 1987 and 1998] and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus
Hall of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio
program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides

Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race. After all, who
enjoys reading about situations where 99.9999% of the human race die in
the first chapter ? Me. This is the life story of Isherwood “Ish”
Williams who survives the plague in northern California in 1949. He
survived the plague due to a rattlesnake bite where only a thousand
people or so survive in the USA.

The book asks and answers many questions. How do you teach the young to
survive as the human civilization gradually rots away ? Can you eat a
60 year old can of Salmon ? How do you keep vehicles running past 20
years when the gasoline and tires have all rotted ?

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars (1,070 reviews)

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2020-04-01 19:27:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-01 21:26:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.

Not a big list.

Lynn
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-01 22:02:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
Hmm. Olaf Stapeldon, _Last & First Men_, _The Starmaker_. Jones with
the Professor Jameson series. Gallun with "Seeds Of The Dusk". Campbell
with his far future Stuart stories in the "Make me a curious machine"
setting. Lester del Rey's "Instinct".

All pre-1950 I think.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
William Hyde
2020-04-01 22:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
Hmm. Olaf Stapeldon, _Last & First Men_, _The Starmaker_. Jones with
the Professor Jameson series. Gallun with "Seeds Of The Dusk". Campbell
with his far future Stuart stories in the "Make me a curious machine"
setting. Lester del Rey's "Instinct".
All pre-1950 I think.
Dish's "The Genocides". Late 60s, I believe.

William Hyde
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-01 22:15:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders
from Rigel_
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
Hmm. Olaf Stapeldon, _Last & First Men_, _The Starmaker_. Jones with
the Professor Jameson series. Gallun with "Seeds Of The Dusk". Campbell
with his far future Stuart stories in the "Make me a curious machine"
setting. Lester del Rey's "Instinct".
All pre-1950 I think.
Dish's "The Genocides". Late 60s, I believe.
I was kind of going for "in that era of SF". Later you get more I think.
What would the 70s be without the massive downers?
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-02 21:40:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders
from Rigel_
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
Hmm. Olaf Stapeldon, _Last & First Men_, _The Starmaker_. Jones with
the Professor Jameson series. Gallun with "Seeds Of The Dusk". Campbell
with his far future Stuart stories in the "Make me a curious machine"
setting. Lester del Rey's "Instinct".
All pre-1950 I think.
Dish's "The Genocides". Late 60s, I believe.
I was kind of going for "in that era of SF". Later you get more I think.
What would the 70s be without the massive downers?
_Emergence_ by David Palmer in 1984:
https://www.amazon.com/Emergence-David-R-Palmer/dp/194881806X/

Lynn
Christian Weisgerber
2020-04-01 22:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Charles Pellegrino & George Zebrowski, _The Killing Star_ (1995)
Genocide by aliens.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
jack tingle
2020-04-03 16:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
I loved Williams and Dix's "Orphans of Earth" series:

Orphans

Echoes of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2002) with Shane Dix
Orphans of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2003) with Shane Dix
Heirs of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2004) with Shane Dix
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-04 02:00:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by jack tingle
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
Au contraire, particularly in that era of SF. Pratt's _Invaders from Rigel_
comes to mind immediately....
In addition to that one unfamiliar to me, I can think of about five
more: Sean Williams, etc.
Not a big list.
Lynn
Orphans
Echoes of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2002) with Shane Dix
Orphans of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2003) with Shane Dix
Heirs of Earth (New York: Ace Books, 2004) with Shane Dix
I have to admit, if these are the books that I think of, then the
concept of nanobot gobblers turning the Earth into grey goo is not pleasant.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-02 17:48:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
https://www.amazon.com/Earth-Abides-George-R-Stewart/dp/0345487133/
A standalone apocalyptic novel about a plague of unprecedented virulence
first published in 1949. I read the well printed and bound trade
paperback published in 2006 with an introduction by Connie Willis.
"Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It
was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction
in 1987 and 1998] and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus
Hall of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio
program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race. After all, who
enjoys reading about situations where 99.9999% of the human race die in
the first chapter ? Me. This is the life story of Isherwood “Ish”
Williams who survives the plague in northern California in 1949. He
survived the plague due to a rattlesnake bite where only a thousand
people or so survive in the USA.
The book asks and answers many questions. How do you teach the young to
survive as the human civilization gradually rots away ? Can you eat a
60 year old can of Salmon ? How do you keep vehicles running past 20
years when the gasoline and tires have all rotted ?
My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars (1,070 reviews)
Lynn
It is a great novel. It is not the Mad Max post-apocalyptic dystopia I was expecting the first time I read it. Rather, it is a meditation on civilization: what is it good for? The death of Joey is a shameless tearjerker, but central to the thrust of the story. Ish was attempting to preserve civilization through Joey. When that went away, Ish came to realize that this had been the wrong direction all along.
Also, the bit about teaching archery as a child's game is kind of brilliant.
Richard Hershberger
Yes and yes.

Lynn
Wolffan
2020-04-02 23:00:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
https://www.amazon.com/Earth-Abides-George-R-Stewart/dp/0345487133/
A standalone apocalyptic novel about a plague of unprecedented virulence
first published in 1949. I read the well printed and bound trade
paperback published in 2006 with an introduction by Connie Willis.
"Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It
was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction
in 1987 and 1998] and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus
Hall of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio
program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
S. M. Stirling has done it three times. In _The Peshawar Lancers_, he has a
Really Big Comet slap the Northern Hemisphere really hard. In the Draka
books, the idiotic Draka and the much more idiotic Yankees have an
_interplanetary_ nuclear war, fought in part by Orion drive spacecraft. And
in the Change books, well... it’s too stupid to go into, but 90+% of
humanity dies in the first 50 pages of the first (of far too many) books. In
_Lucifer’s Hammer_ Niven& Pournelle have another Really Big Comet do
naughty things, aided by a short nuclear war between China and the Russkies,
China having noted that they’re _south_ of Russkieland and that it’s
about to get Very Cold up there. Niven & Pournelle have aliens drop
a’foot’ into the Indian Ocean, with Really Interesting Effects worldwide,
in _Footfall_. Niven writing bon his lonesome, wants to kill off the entire
_galaxy (except for the Puppeteers, who are running away as fast as they can.
I ignore the later sharecropping books, none of which I’ve read anyway.)
Dean Ing has a nuclear war, and bioweapons, and other stuff, (including a
Really Big Pig, but let’s not go there) roam loose in the Quantrill books.
H. Beam Piper’s Federation/Empire books were set after yet another nuclear
war wipes out the Northern Hemisphere; at least one story in the series has a
largely depopulated Earth in the middle of a massive glaciation. David R.
Palmer’s one and only book, _Emergence_ (there was only one, ignore the
alleged thing which allegedly came out under his name afterwards) wiped out
pretty much everyone. Star Blazers/Space Battleship Yamato has the Earth
(Japan) pounded flat by the evil Gamelons (Americans) and their radiation
weapons, until saved by the valiant heroes of the United Nations Space Fleet
(the Kaigun Nihon) and the incomparable superbattleship Argo/Yamato. (I want
a Wave Motion Gun. I really do.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
After all, who
enjoys reading about situations where 99.9999% of the human race die in
the first chapter ? Me. This is the life story of Isherwood “Ish”
Williams who survives the plague in northern California in 1949. He
survived the plague due to a rattlesnake bite where only a thousand
people or so survive in the USA.
The book asks and answers many questions. How do you teach the young to
survive as the human civilization gradually rots away ? Can you eat a
60 year old can of Salmon ? How do you keep vehicles running past 20
years when the gasoline and tires have all rotted ?
My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars (1,070 reviews)
Lynn
Kevrob
2020-04-03 01:05:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolffan
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
https://www.amazon.com/Earth-Abides-George-R-Stewart/dp/0345487133/
A standalone apocalyptic novel about a plague of unprecedented virulence
first published in 1949. I read the well printed and bound trade
paperback published in 2006 with an introduction by Connie Willis.
"Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It
was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction
in 1987 and 1998] and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus
Hall of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio
program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
S. M. Stirling has done it three times. In _The Peshawar Lancers_, he has a
Really Big Comet slap the Northern Hemisphere really hard. In the Draka
books, the idiotic Draka and the much more idiotic Yankees have an
_interplanetary_ nuclear war, fought in part by Orion drive spacecraft. And
in the Change books, well... it’s too stupid to go into, but 90+% of
humanity dies in the first 50 pages of the first (of far too many) books. In
_Lucifer’s Hammer_ Niven& Pournelle have another Really Big Comet do
naughty things, aided by a short nuclear war between China and the Russkies,
China having noted that they’re _south_ of Russkieland and that it’s
about to get Very Cold up there. Niven & Pournelle have aliens drop
a’foot’ into the Indian Ocean, with Really Interesting Effects worldwide,
in _Footfall_. Niven writing bon his lonesome, wants to kill off the entire
_galaxy (except for the Puppeteers, who are running away as fast as they can.
I ignore the later sharecropping books, none of which I’ve read anyway.)
Dean Ing has a nuclear war, and bioweapons, and other stuff, (including a
Really Big Pig, but let’s not go there) roam loose in the Quantrill books.
H. Beam Piper’s Federation/Empire books were set after yet another nuclear
war wipes out the Northern Hemisphere; at least one story in the series has a
largely depopulated Earth in the middle of a massive glaciation. David R.
Palmer’s one and only book, _Emergence_ (there was only one, ignore the
alleged thing which allegedly came out under his name afterwards) wiped out
pretty much everyone. Star Blazers/Space Battleship Yamato has the Earth
(Japan) pounded flat by the evil Gamelons (Americans) and their radiation
weapons, until saved by the valiant heroes of the United Nations Space Fleet
(the Kaigun Nihon) and the incomparable superbattleship Argo/Yamato. (I want
a Wave Motion Gun. I really do.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
After all, who
enjoys reading about situations where 99.9999% of
the human race die in the first chapter
I grew up on SUPERMAN comics, and in the first strip,l back
in 1938, Jerry Siegel casually blows up the planet to be later
known as Krypton. That's not Earth, but s the series went on,
they played with "imaginary stories" where Krypton survived
and it was Terra that went kablooey, usually with one human
survivor who manages to have superpowers in an environment
where Lois or Jimmy ought to be equivalent to myasthenia gravis
sufferers. I learned about MG reading RAH's "Waldo," of course.

An example: SUPERMAN #159. Feb 1963 cover date.

"Lois Lane, the Super-Maid of Krypton!"

Written by Edmund "World Wrecker" Hamilton

https://www.comics.org/issue/17504/cover/4/

https://comicvine.gamespot.com/superman-159-lois-lane-the-super-maid-of-krypton/4000-6367/

I would have just turned 6, and remember this one well.
I probably read it waiting to get my hair cut at Larry's
Barber shop. Even in the regular continuity, Kal-El met
an annoyingly large number of "last survivors" of other
alien races. Done too many times, it made the Last Son
of Krypton look less special than when his origin was
unique. The casual destruction of millions for the
entertainment of pre-teen Kevrob was what was important!

Kevin R
Christian Weisgerber
2020-04-03 14:55:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolffan
Post by Lynn McGuire
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
S. M. Stirling has done it three times. In _The Peshawar Lancers_, he has a
Really Big Comet slap the Northern Hemisphere really hard. In the Draka
books, the idiotic Draka and the much more idiotic Yankees have an
_interplanetary_ nuclear war, fought in part by Orion drive spacecraft. And
in the Change books, well... it’s too stupid to go into, but 90+% of
humanity dies in the first 50 pages of the first (of far too many) books. In
_Lucifer’s Hammer_ Niven& Pournelle have another Really Big Comet do
naughty things, aided by a short nuclear war between China and the Russkies,
China having noted that they’re _south_ of Russkieland and that it’s
about to get Very Cold up there. Niven & Pournelle have aliens drop
a’foot’ into the Indian Ocean, with Really Interesting Effects worldwide,
in _Footfall_.
These all sound like mass casualties rather than extinction.
Post by Wolffan
Niven writing bon his lonesome, wants to kill off the entire
_galaxy (except for the Puppeteers, who are running away as fast as they can.
He already did once! You are alluding to the explosion of the
galactic core, but 1.5 billion years ago the Slavers' telepathic
doomsday device wiped out all intelligent life in the galaxy.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
Paul Colquhoun
2020-04-04 01:23:42 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Apr 2020 14:55:28 -0000 (UTC), Christian Weisgerber <***@mips.inka.de> wrote:
| On 2020-04-02, Wolffan <***@zoho.com> wrote:
|
|>> Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
|>
|> S. M. Stirling has done it three times. In _The Peshawar Lancers_, he has a
|> Really Big Comet slap the Northern Hemisphere really hard. In the Draka
|> books, the idiotic Draka and the much more idiotic Yankees have an
|> _interplanetary_ nuclear war, fought in part by Orion drive spacecraft. And
|> in the Change books, well... it’s too stupid to go into, but 90+% of
|> humanity dies in the first 50 pages of the first (of far too many) books. In
|> _Lucifer’s Hammer_ Niven& Pournelle have another Really Big Comet do
|> naughty things, aided by a short nuclear war between China and the Russkies,
|> China having noted that they’re _south_ of Russkieland and that it’s
|> about to get Very Cold up there. Niven & Pournelle have aliens drop
|> a’foot’ into the Indian Ocean, with Really Interesting Effects worldwide,
|> in _Footfall_.
|
| These all sound like mass casualties rather than extinction.
|
|> Niven writing bon his lonesome, wants to kill off the entire
|> _galaxy (except for the Puppeteers, who are running away as fast as they can.
|
| He already did once! You are alluding to the explosion of the
| galactic core, but 1.5 billion years ago the Slavers' telepathic
| doomsday device wiped out all intelligent life in the galaxy.


Except for the Bandersnatchi that live on Jinx, who were designed to be
immune by the Tnuctipun who created them.
--
Reverend Paul Colquhoun, ULC. http://andor.dropbear.id.au/
Asking for technical help in newsgroups? Read this first:
http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#intro
Lynn McGuire
2020-04-04 02:03:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolffan
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Earth Abides: A Novel_ by George R. Stewart
https://www.amazon.com/Earth-Abides-George-R-Stewart/dp/0345487133/
A standalone apocalyptic novel about a plague of unprecedented virulence
first published in 1949. I read the well printed and bound trade
paperback published in 2006 with an introduction by Connie Willis.
"Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It
was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction
in 1987 and 1998] and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus
Hall of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio
program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides
Few authors have the courage to kill off the human race.
S. M. Stirling has done it three times. In _The Peshawar Lancers_, he has a
Really Big Comet slap the Northern Hemisphere really hard. In the Draka
books, the idiotic Draka and the much more idiotic Yankees have an
_interplanetary_ nuclear war, fought in part by Orion drive spacecraft. And
in the Change books, well... it’s too stupid to go into, but 90+% of
humanity dies in the first 50 pages of the first (of far too many) books. In
_Lucifer’s Hammer_ Niven& Pournelle have another Really Big Comet do
naughty things, aided by a short nuclear war between China and the Russkies,
China having noted that they’re _south_ of Russkieland and that it’s
about to get Very Cold up there. Niven & Pournelle have aliens drop
a’foot’ into the Indian Ocean, with Really Interesting Effects worldwide,
in _Footfall_. Niven writing bon his lonesome, wants to kill off the entire
_galaxy (except for the Puppeteers, who are running away as fast as they can.
I ignore the later sharecropping books, none of which I’ve read anyway.)
Dean Ing has a nuclear war, and bioweapons, and other stuff, (including a
Really Big Pig, but let’s not go there) roam loose in the Quantrill books.
H. Beam Piper’s Federation/Empire books were set after yet another nuclear
war wipes out the Northern Hemisphere; at least one story in the series has a
largely depopulated Earth in the middle of a massive glaciation. David R.
Palmer’s one and only book, _Emergence_ (there was only one, ignore the
alleged thing which allegedly came out under his name afterwards) wiped out
pretty much everyone. Star Blazers/Space Battleship Yamato has the Earth
(Japan) pounded flat by the evil Gamelons (Americans) and their radiation
weapons, until saved by the valiant heroes of the United Nations Space Fleet
(the Kaigun Nihon) and the incomparable superbattleship Argo/Yamato. (I want
a Wave Motion Gun. I really do.)
Post by Lynn McGuire
After all, who
enjoys reading about situations where 99.9999% of the human race die in
the first chapter ? Me. This is the life story of Isherwood “Ish”
Williams who survives the plague in northern California in 1949. He
survived the plague due to a rattlesnake bite where only a thousand
people or so survive in the USA.
The book asks and answers many questions. How do you teach the young to
survive as the human civilization gradually rots away ? Can you eat a
60 year old can of Salmon ? How do you keep vehicles running past 20
years when the gasoline and tires have all rotted ?
My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars (1,070 reviews)
Lynn
In _Dies The Fire_, Stirling killed off most of the population to
starvation and exposure over several years. And war.

Lynn

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