Discussion:
Ready for your flying car?
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Scott Lurndal
2021-05-21 16:14:10 UTC
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Pre-order now:

https://www.askafly.com/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2021-05-21 16:19:04 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."

Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-22 03:44:35 UTC
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
Even if they were actually selling the things, I would say Hell
No. I never even learned to drive in two dimensions.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Alan Baker
2021-05-22 04:01:32 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
Even if they were actually selling the things, I would say Hell
No. I never even learned to drive in two dimensions.
You seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
Robert Woodward
2021-05-22 04:46:04 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
Even if they were actually selling the things, I would say Hell
No. I never even learned to drive in two dimensions.
You seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
Perhaps she is only interested in learning things she needs to know (by
HER definition of needs, not yours).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Alan Baker
2021-05-22 05:01:08 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
Even if they were actually selling the things, I would say Hell
No. I never even learned to drive in two dimensions.
You seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
Perhaps she is only interested in learning things she needs to know (by
HER definition of needs, not yours).
Oh, I get that.

I just think it's wrong.

Too much "I can't".
Quadibloc
2021-05-22 05:50:48 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Alan Baker
You seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
Perhaps she is only interested in learning things she needs to know (by
HER definition of needs, not yours).
Oh, I get that.
Do you?
Post by Alan Baker
I just think it's wrong.
Too much "I can't".
I don't know her well enough to know if she has been lazy or
neglectful of learning new things. I rather doubt, however, that
this is the case.

If it seems to you that too often there are things she doesn't
know how to do that people are normally expected to know
how to do, it could be that she simply "chose a road less
travelled by".

I only learned how to drive a car when it seemed I might have
the economic means to buy one.

I know a lot about how to use a computer... because I was
interested in, and studied, science and math. So I used computers
in the early days, and saw the arrival of 8-bit microprocessor-based
computers that ordinary people could actually own as a godsend.

Plenty of people weren't as interested as I was in computers. Of course,
now, thanks to the World Wide Web, having some kind of computer
connected to the Internet... no, that's not "now"; that's several years ago;
_now_ even those who hadn't been enticed into putting a PC on their desk
to surf the web still do have a computer connected to the Internet...
in their pockets, so that they can have a telephone.

But those changes happened pretty recently. When people are young, they
have more time, and more flexible minds, to learn new things. So people
who have lived most of a lifetime when certain skills were not particularly
important... will face a difficult learning curve if that suddenly changes.

As the saying goes,

Vita brevis, ars longa.
(Life is short, and art is long.)

Life is short, and we don't have time to learn everything.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-22 13:29:40 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
Even if they were actually selling the things, I would say Hell
No. I never even learned to drive in two dimensions.
You seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
Perhaps she is only interested in learning things she needs to know (by
HER definition of needs, not yours).
Good point.

That I never learned to drive falls under the heading of "the
shoemaker's children go barefooot." My father was an expert on
driver education and training. He was a consultant on the
subject for the Los Angeles County Education Department.

Did this mean that he could teach his only daughter to drive?
No, it did not. He tried once, and nearly had a nervous
breakdown. So he signed me up for a professional driving
trainer, and I had one lesson with him; then my father had a
conversation with him and decided he wasn't good enough.

Later on, Hal tried to teach me to drive, over the first several
years of our marriage. I would pass the written test with no
trouble: I had grown up with the California rules of the road.
But when it came to taking the driving test, I invariably
flunked. It seems I lack situational awareness.

It would have been convenient if I'd been able to drive; but it
was not to be. Now I'm 78 and blind in one eye and physically
weak and I don't think I could learn if I tried.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2021-05-22 06:17:29 UTC
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You [Dorothy Heydt] seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
What is the point of writing that? It is completely negative.
Are you catching Jibini derangement symptom?
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-22 12:03:54 UTC
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Post by Titus G
You [Dorothy Heydt] seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
What is the point of writing that? It is completely negative.
Are you catching Jibini derangement symptom?
Alan is sounding more like that.

This time, I'm not sure if he objects to Mrs Heydt
not wanting to buy, keep, and personally operate
a so-called flying car (e.g. a helicopter), or an old,
twentieth century ground car.

Amongst things, she went to college, got married,
raised a couple generations of kids, and created
and/or supported governance of several alternate
universes, so I say she's done plenty. If you've
created a car driver by a process of chromosomal
mitosis, then why learn yourself? And vice versa.
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-22 16:32:50 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
You [Dorothy Heydt] seem to have made it your life's mission to avoid learning things.
What is the point of writing that? It is completely negative.
Are you catching Jibini derangement symptom?
Alan is sounding more like that.
This time, I'm not sure if he objects to Mrs Heydt
not wanting to buy, keep, and personally operate
a so-called flying car (e.g. a helicopter), or an old,
twentieth century ground car.
Amongst things, she went to college, got married,
raised a couple generations of kids, and created
and/or supported governance of several alternate
universes, so I say she's done plenty. If you've
created a car driver by a process of chromosomal
mitosis, then why learn yourself? And vice versa.
Sadly, Alan is very strident and judgemental. I blocked him a long time
ago.

Lynn
Alan Baker
2021-05-22 04:01:06 UTC
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
"That $5,000 -- held in an escrow account and fully refundable, by
the way -- gets you one share of the company's stock, admittance to
status update meetings every three to six months, and a place at the
head of the line for a planned 1,500 limited-edition models of the
Aska, each costing a whopping $789,000."
Yeah, that'll replace every $20,000 daily driver on the road.
No one is suggesting it will...

...but you can't figure out that technology changes they way things are
done, so there's no explaining it to you.

:-)
Quadibloc
2021-05-22 05:38:08 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
...but you can't figure out that technology changes they way things are
done, so there's no explaining it to you.
Until the technology of flying cars is based on something like
antigravity or at least nuclear power (if somehow it didn't pose
a safety hazard in that kind of application, unlike utility electricity),
given the scarcity of fossil fuels and the concern of global warming,
flying cars that are basically just fancy gas-guzzling airplanes are
unlikely to change transportation.

John Savard
J. Clarke
2021-05-22 11:48:38 UTC
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On Fri, 21 May 2021 22:38:08 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Alan Baker
...but you can't figure out that technology changes they way things are
done, so there's no explaining it to you.
Until the technology of flying cars is based on something like
antigravity or at least nuclear power (if somehow it didn't pose
a safety hazard in that kind of application, unlike utility electricity),
given the scarcity of fossil fuels and the concern of global warming,
flying cars that are basically just fancy gas-guzzling airplanes are
unlikely to change transportation.
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.

What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
Quadibloc
2021-05-22 12:56:11 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.
What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
I didn't see it mentioned here that it was electric.

Now that I've visited the web site, I see that it is described as
electric. It also has a "range extender", however, and I've looked through
the site, but I don't see it mentioned anywhere whether the range extender
is a bigger electric battery or something that does use fossil fuels.

I knew there were experimental electric airplanes being worked on,
but I had not thought that the technology was practical yet.

John Savard
J. Clarke
2021-05-22 13:44:43 UTC
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On Sat, 22 May 2021 05:56:11 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.
What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
I didn't see it mentioned here that it was electric.
Now that I've visited the web site, I see that it is described as
electric. It also has a "range extender", however, and I've looked through
the site, but I don't see it mentioned anywhere whether the range extender
is a bigger electric battery or something that does use fossil fuels.
I knew there were experimental electric airplanes being worked on,
but I had not thought that the technology was practical yet.
Depends on your definition of "practical".

Airbus has produced a number of technology demonstrators, the most
recent of which was in partnership with Rolls Royce demonstrating an
engine on a four-engine airliner.
Scott Lurndal
2021-05-22 15:00:58 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 22 May 2021 05:56:11 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.
What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
I didn't see it mentioned here that it was electric.
Now that I've visited the web site, I see that it is described as
electric. It also has a "range extender", however, and I've looked through
the site, but I don't see it mentioned anywhere whether the range extender
is a bigger electric battery or something that does use fossil fuels.
I knew there were experimental electric airplanes being worked on,
but I had not thought that the technology was practical yet.
Depends on your definition of "practical".
Airbus has produced a number of technology demonstrators, the most
recent of which was in partnership with Rolls Royce demonstrating an
engine on a four-engine airliner.
Airbus is also all-in for hydrogen based fuels.

https://www.airbus.com/innovation/zero-emission/hydrogen/zeroe.html
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-22 16:34:43 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 22 May 2021 05:56:11 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.
What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
I didn't see it mentioned here that it was electric.
Now that I've visited the web site, I see that it is described as
electric. It also has a "range extender", however, and I've looked through
the site, but I don't see it mentioned anywhere whether the range extender
is a bigger electric battery or something that does use fossil fuels.
I knew there were experimental electric airplanes being worked on,
but I had not thought that the technology was practical yet.
Depends on your definition of "practical".
Airbus has produced a number of technology demonstrators, the most
recent of which was in partnership with Rolls Royce demonstrating an
engine on a four-engine airliner.
Airbus is also all-in for hydrogen based fuels.
https://www.airbus.com/innovation/zero-emission/hydrogen/zeroe.html
Hydrogen fuels did not work out so well in the 1930s. But, materials
technology is much better now. Still, hydrogen wants to be free !

Lynn

Scott Lurndal
2021-05-22 15:00:00 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
Uh, John, the proposal under discussion is not "gas-guzzling". Neither
have the last several that have been discussed here.
What part of "electric" is giving you trouble?
I didn't see it mentioned here that it was electric.
Now that I've visited the web site, I see that it is described as
electric. It also has a "range extender", however, and I've looked through
the site, but I don't see it mentioned anywhere whether the range extender
is a bigger electric battery or something that does use fossil fuels.
Most of them are looking at either additional batteries,
new battery chemistries or hydrogen fuel cells. The latter
may be the 'range extender' for the Aska eVTOL;
full-scale flight demonstrations start early 2022.

"The size of an SUV, the Aska is aimed at the owner-flown
commuter market. It is designed to be stored in a garage,
driven to the local airfield, flown to an airport close to a
city and then driven by road to the final destination."

"Flight range up to 250 mi, and at initial release, will
be approved to be driven on local roads at lower speeds".

- AW&ST May 3-16 2021, pp 53.
Charles Packer
2021-05-22 07:59:12 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
https://www.askafly.com/
I see that the company founders are husband and wife. Heralding the
return of "power couple" to the cultural vocabulary?
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